Catalogue


Black experience and the empire /
Philip D. Morgan, editor and Sean Hawkins, editor.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2004.
description
xv, 416 p., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
019926029X
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2004.
isbn
019926029X
catalogue key
5210635
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-04-01:
This is the latest in the "Companion Series" to editor-in-chief Wm. Roger Louis's five volume The Oxford History of the British Empire (1998-99; vol. 4, CH, Jul'00, 37-6476; vol. 5, Jun'00, 37-5891). These parallel supplementary volumes cover themes that could not be covered in the main series, which concentrated on the political, constitutional, and economic history of the empire and commonwealth. This volume analyzes how Africans and people of African descent reacted to both the sufferings and benefits of British rule--reactions that like the rule itself were ambivalent and contradictory. The book is also a history of the African diaspora within the empire; as the editors remark, no other people traveled more, though often unwillingly. Fourteen authors--US, British, African, and Canadian--have come together to produce a truly outstanding contribution to scholarship that no one interested in the history of Africa and its people in the US, Britain, Canada, or the former British colonies in the Caribbean can afford not to read. Especially valuable is the way the authors analyze the best of the recent scholarship in relation to their topics, especially those relating to the history of slavery and its abolition. ^BSumming Up: Essential. All levels/libraries. J. E. Flint emeritus, Dalhousie University
Reviews
Review Quotes
a substantial volume which should be of as much benefit to historians of modern Britain as to those of its empire, [...] Black Experience and the Empire is, in all, a considerable achievement, and its individual contributors are to be commended for presenting complex processes and ideas in so concise and accessible a way.
"Fourteen authors--US, British, African, and Canadian--have come together to produce a truly outstanding contribution to scholarship that no one interested in the history of Africa and its people in the US, Britain, Canada,or the former British colonies in the Caribbean can afford not to read. Especially valuable is the way the authors analyze the best of the recent scholarship in relation to their topics, especially those relating to the history of slavery and its abolition. Essential."--CHOICE The Black Experience is a volume which will be of primary importance for a wide range of historians, and not simply those interested in the historical experience of people of African descent. This is a volume that speaks to some of the major historical forces of the past three centuries. Morgan and Hawkins have managed a demanding task with great editorial skill. The end result is an important volume which embraces the best of historical originality and intellectual vigor. The editors' introduction is a model of clarity and precision, making sense of the mass of detail that follows and arguing for the coherence of the collection. It was clearly not an easy task, but they have carried it off with persuasive aplomb. --James Walvin, University of York
"Fourteen authors--US, British, African, and Canadian--have come together to produce a truly outstanding contribution to scholarship that no one interested in the history of Africa and its people in the US, Britain, Canada, or the former British colonies in the Caribbean can afford not to read. Especially valuable is the way the authors analyze the best of the recent scholarship in relation to their topics, especially those relating to the history of slavery and its abolition. Essential."--CHOICE The Black Experience is a volume which will be of primary importance for a wide range of historians, and not simply those interested in the historical experience of people of African descent. This is a volume that speaks to some of the major historical forces of the past three centuries. Morgan and Hawkins have managed a demanding task with great editorial skill. The end result is an important volume which embraces the best of historical originality and intellectual vigor. The editors' introduction is a model of clarity and precision, making sense of the mass of detail that follows and arguing for the coherence of the collection. It was clearly not an easy task, but they have carried it off with persuasive aplomb. --James Walvin, University of York
"Fourteen authors--US, British, African, and Canadian--have come together to produce a truly outstanding contribution to scholarship that no one interested in the history of Africa and its people in the US, Britain, Canada,or the former British colonies in the Caribbean can afford not to read. Especially valuable is the way the authors analyze the best of the recent scholarship in relation to their topics, especially those relating to the history of slavery and its abolition. Essential."--CHOICE The Black Experienceis a volume which will be of primary importance for a wide range of historians, and not simply those interested in the historical experience of people of African descent. This is a volume that speaks to some of the major historical forces of the past three centuries. Morgan and Hawkins have managed a demanding task with great editorial skill. The end result is an important volume which embraces the best of historical originality and intellectual vigor. The editors' introduction is a model of clarity and precision, making sense of the mass of detail that follows and arguing for the coherence of the collection. It was clearly not an easy task, but they have carried it off with persuasive aplomb. --James Walvin, University of York
...stimulating essays...
Preface Sean Hawkins and Philip Morgan: Introduction 1. David Northrup: West Africans and the Atlantic 1500-1800 2. David Richardson: Through a Looking Glass: Olaudah Equiano and African Experiences in the British Slave Trade 3. Philip Morgan: The Black Experience in the British Empire 1680-1810 4. Christopher L. Brown: From Slaves to Subjects: Envisioning an Empire without Slavery 1772-1834 5. Gad Heuman: From Slavery to Freedom: Blacks in the Nineteenth Century British West Indies 6. T. C. McCaskie: Cultural Encounters: Britain and Africa in the Nineteenth Century 7. Vivian Bickford-Smith: The Betrayal of Creole Elites 1880-1920 8. Diana Jeater: The British Empire and African Women in the Twentieth Century 9. Timothy Parsons: African Participation in the British Empire 10. Frederick Cooper: African Workers and Imperial Designs 11. Howard Johnson: The Black Experience in the British Caribbean in the Twentieth Century 12. Winston James: The Black Experience in Twentieth Century Britain 13. Kwame Anthony Appiah: Language, Race, and the Legacies of the British Empire
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2005
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Exploring the lives of sub-Saharan people from the sixteenth century onwards, this book describes how they were shaped by the empire in everything from material goods to cultural style. No people were more uprooted and dislocated, therefore creating a trans-imperial culture.
Long Description
This work explores the lives of people of sub-Saharan Africa and their descendants, how they were shaped by empire, and how they in turn influenced the empire in everything from material goods to cultural style. The black experience varied greatly across space and over time. Accordingly, thirteen substantive essays and a scene-setting introduction range from West Africa in the sixteenth century, through the history of the slave trade and slavery down to the 1830s, to nineteenth- and twentieth-century participation of blacks in the empire as workers, soldiers, members of colonial elites, intellectuals, athletes, and musicians. No people were more uprooted and dislocated; or travelled more within the empire; or created more of a trans-imperial culture. In the crucible of the British empire, blacks invented cultural mixes that were precursors to our modern selves - hybrid, fluid, ambiguous, and constantly in motion. SERIES DESCRIPTION The purpose of the five volumes of the Oxford History of the British Empire was to provide a comprehensive study of the Empire from its beginning to end, the meaning of British imperialism for the ruled as well as the rulers, and the significance of the British Empire as a theme in world history. The volumes in the Companion Series carry forward this purpose by exploring themes that were not possible to cover adequately in the main series, and to provide fresh interpretations of significant topics
Main Description
This work explores the lives of people of sub-Saharan Africa and their descendants, how they were shaped by empire, and how they in turn influenced the empire in everything from material goods to cultural style. The black experience varied greatly across space and over time. Accordingly, thirteen substantive essays and a scene-setting introduction range from West Africa in the sixteenth century, through the history of the slave trade and slavery down to the 1830s, to nineteenth- and twentieth-century participation of blacks in the empire as workers, soldiers, members of colonial elites, intellectuals, athletes, and musicians. No people were more uprooted and dislocated; or traveled more within the empire; or created more of a trans-imperial culture. In the crucible of the British empire, blacks invented cultural mixes that were precursors to our modern selves - hybrid, fluid, ambiguous, and constantly in motion.
Main Description
This work explores the lives of people of sub-Saharan Africa and their descendants, how they were shaped by empire, and how they in turn influenced the empire in everything from material goods to cultural style. The black experience varied greatly across space and over time. Accordingly,thirteen substantive essays and a scene-setting introduction range from West Africa in the sixteenth century, through the history of the slave trade and slavery down to the 1830s, to nineteenth- and twentieth-century participation of blacks in the empire as workers, soldiers, members of colonialelites, intellectuals, athletes, and musicians. No people were more uprooted and dislocated; or traveled more within the empire; or created more of a trans-imperial culture. In the crucible of the British empire, blacks invented cultural mixes that were precursors to our modern selves - hybrid,fluid, ambiguous, and constantly in motion. SERIES DESCRIPTIONThe purpose of the five volumes of the Oxford History of the British Empire was to provide a comprehensive study of the Empire from its beginning to end, the meaning of British imperialism for the ruled as well as the rulers, and the significance of the British Empire as a theme in world history.The volumes in the Companion Series carry forward this purpose by exploring themes that were not possible to cover adequately in the main series, and to provide fresh interpretations of significant topics.
Table of Contents
Preface
Introduction
West Africans and the Atlantic 1500-1800
Through a Looking Glass: Olaudah Equiano and African Experiences in the British Slave Trade
The Black Experience in the British Empire 1680-1810
From Slaves to Subjects: Envisioning an Empire without Slavery 1772-1834
From Slavery to Freedom: Blacks in the Nineteenth Century British West Indies
Cultural Encounters: Britain and Africa in the Nineteenth Century
The Betrayal of Creole Elites 1880-1920
The British Empire and African Women in the Twentieth Century
African Participation in the British Empire
African Workers and Imperial Designs
The Black Experience in the British Caribbean in the Twentieth Century
The Black Experience in Twentieth Century Britain
Language, Race, and the Legacies of the British Empire
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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