Catalogue


Correspondence. First session, September-November 1789 /
Charlene Bangs Bickford ... [et al.], editors.
imprint
Baltimore, Md. ; London : Johns Hopkins University Press, c2004.
description
ix, 1433-2123 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.
ISBN
080187162X
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Baltimore, Md. ; London : Johns Hopkins University Press, c2004.
isbn
080187162X
contents note
September 1789 -- October 1789 -- November 1789 -- Undated 1789.
catalogue key
5202052
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 1751-1913) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A wealth of materials. For the first time, a significant part of the early history of Congress will be made accessible to legal scholars, a fact that I believe will significantly inform their discourse." -- Christine Desan, Harvard University Law School
One of the most imaginative and valuable editorial projects ever undertaken for any aspect of American history.
"One of the most imaginative and valuable editorial projects ever undertaken for any aspect of American history." -- John M. Murrin, Princeton University
A wealth of materials. For the first time, a significant part of the early history of Congress will be made accessible to legal scholars, a fact that I believe will significantly inform their discourse.
"A monument of careful yet easily usable scholarship. The formal legislative record always needs to be supplemented by the evidence of personal correspondence. This correspondence is in its own important way a memorial to a crucial moment in the translation of the constitution from founding text into functioning document, because it helped to establish the links necessary to maintain loyalty to the new government. The completion of the DHFFC will fill in one of the most exciting and momentous chapters in American political history." -- Jack Rakove, Stanford University
A monument of careful yet easily usable scholarship. The formal legislative record always needs to be supplemented by the evidence of personal correspondence. This correspondence is in its own important way a memorial to a crucial moment in the translation of the constitution from founding text into functioning document, because it helped to establish the links necessary to maintain loyalty to the new government. The completion of the DHFFC will fill in one of the most exciting and momentous chapters in American political history.
"This complete and well-edited record of the First Federal Congress is a model documentary edition. Historians of the early republic owe thanks to the editors and publisher of this exemplary collection." -- Kenneth R. Stevens, Journal of the Early Republic
This complete and well-edited record of the First Federal Congress is a model documentary edition. Historians of the early republic owe thanks to the editors and publisher of this exemplary collection.
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Three new volumes in this acclaimed series present letters written by and to members of the First Federal Congress and communications from other informed individuals at the seat of government in New York City by 1789. The letters bring the official record to life by providing details about the political process through which Congress began to accomplish its daunting agenda by establishing the first federal revenue system, fleshing out the executive and judicial branches outlined in the Constitution, drafting the Bill of Rights, and beginning to tackle the divisive issue of locating the permanent federal capital. The documents supply a rich source of information about the members' opinions on issues, lives in New York and concerns about their distant families, and the services they provided for constituents, as well as constituent opinions about issues. They also make available for the first time in English the frank and insightful letters of the French minister on the subject of the new federal government.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This volume presents letters written by and to members of the First Federal Congress and communications from other informed individuals at the seat of government in New York City by 1789. They bring the official record to life by providing details about the political process.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem