Catalogue


Tests of global governance : Canadian diplomacy and United Nations world conferences /
Andrew F. Cooper.
imprint
Tokyo : United Nations University Press, c2004.
description
xi, 298 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9280810960 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Tokyo : United Nations University Press, c2004.
isbn
9280810960 (pbk.)
general note
"UNUP-1096" -- T.p. verso.
catalogue key
5200685
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 261-285) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Andrew F. Cooper is a Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Waterloo, Canada, and Associate Director of the Centre for International Governance Innovation.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work provides a detailed examination of what happens when traditional diplomatic methods interface with new forms of global governance.
Main Description
This book is unique in its use of UN World conferences as a testing ground in the study of global governance. It provides a detailed examination of the conferences with respect to the interface between diplomatic method and new forms of global governance. Because of the complex dynamics involved in these large international conferences, a number of important theoretical debates central to the study of international relations are highlighted. Using Canada as a case study the work demonstrates that global governance is a differentiated multi-spectral site of activity within which states and non-state actors alike, particularly NGOs, play vital, often conflicting roles. The main focus is on the span of activity from the 1992 Rio UNCED conference, through the 1993 Vienna Conference on Human Rights, the 1994 Cairo Conference on Population and Development, the 1995 World Summit for Social Development, and the 1995 Beijing Conference on Women, to the 2001 Durban World Conference on Racism. The picture that emerges, while not translating into a complete recipe for a shift towards democratic governance, suggests a deepening network of institutions, actors, and organizations forming the complex regimes that govern the major arenas of world politics. At a country-specific level, the analysis supports the view that a deep residue of multilateralism still exists in Canada but argues that this tradition faces on-going challenges from a variety of sources.
Main Description
This book provides a detailed examination of what happens when traditional diplomatic methods interface with new forms of global governance. The role of Canada is given special attention as both a unique and representative sample of how the interplay between diplomacy and global governance has played out over the past decade or so during UN World Conferences. The main focus is on the span of activity from the 1992 Rio UNCED conference, through the 1993 Vienna Conference on Human Rights, the 1994 Cairo Conference on Population and Development, the 1995 World Summit for Social Development, the 1995 Beijing Conference on Women, to the 2001 Durban World Conference on Racism.The picture that emerges, while not translating into a complete recipe for a shift toward democratic governance, suggests a deepening network of institutions, actors, and organizations forming the complex regimes that govern the major arenas of world politics. At a country-specific level, the analysis supports the view that a deep residue of multilateralism still exists in Canada but argues that this tradition faces ongoing challenges from a variety of sources.
Unpaid Annotation
A detailed examination of UN World Conferences with respect to the interface between diplomatic method and new forms of global governance. On a case study basis the work demonstrates that global governance is a differentiated multi-spectral site of activity within which states and non-state actors alike, particularly NGOs, play vital, often conflicting roles. The role of Canada and Canadians is given special attention as both a unique and representative sample of how this dual interplay between diplomacy and global governance and state and society-craft has played out over the past decade or so with respect to the UN World Conferences.
Unpaid Annotation
This book provides a detailed examination of what happens when traditional diplomatic methods interface with new forms of global governance. The role of Canada is given special attention as both a unique and representative sample of how the interplay between diplomacy and global governance has played out over the past decade or so during UN World Conferences. The main focus is on the span of activity from the 1992 Rio UNCED conference, through the 1993 Vienna Conference on Human Rights, the 1994 Cairo Conference on Population and Development, the 1995 World Summit for Social Development, the 1995 Beijing Conference on Women, to the 2001 Durban World Conference on Racism. The picture that emerges, while not translating into a complete recipe for a shift toward democratic governance, suggests a deepening network of institutions, actors, and organizations forming the complex regimes that govern the major arenas of world politics. At a country-specific level, the analysis supports the view that a deep residue of multilateralism still exists in Canada but argues that this tradition faces ongoing challenges from a variety of sources.
Table of Contents
Acronymsp. vii
Prefacep. ix
United Nations world conferences as tests of global governance: an overviewp. 1
Emerging tests of diplomacy: transition from earlier UN world conferencesp. 12
Tests of partnership: between statecraft and society-craftp. 40
Tests of leadership: the prime ministerial rolep. 69
Tests of discipline: imposition or negotiation of the system of governance?p. 94
Tests of sovereignty: an evasive and estranged diplomacy?p. 122
Tests of the civilisational divide? The Cairo International Conference on Population and Developmentp. 152
Tests of difference: women's ownership of the Beijing conferencep. 184
Tests of value with respect to Durban and beyond: anomaly or end of the life cycle?p. 223
Notesp. 254
Referencesp. 261
Indexp. 286
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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