Catalogue


Overcoming our racism : the journey to liberation /
Derald Wing Sue.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
San Francisco : Jossey-Bass, c2003.
description
xv, 297 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0787967440
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
More Details
imprint
San Francisco : Jossey-Bass, c2003.
isbn
0787967440
catalogue key
5200522
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Derald Wing Sue is professor of psychology and education at Teachers College, Columbia University.
Excerpts
Flap Copy
If you are white and live in America, the odds are- no matter what your economic status or educational background- you are a racist! However painful and embarrassing to admit, we all have innate, long-standing, and instinctive attitudes, stereotypes, and prejudices toward other ethnic and racial groups. Overcoming Our Racism is an extraordinary book that helps you- no matter what your race or ethnic origin- make an honest appraisal of yourself and your biases and prejudices and guides you on your journey to becoming a person who truly values inclusion, respect, fairness, and the upholding of social justice. Written by Derald Wing Sue- a pioneer and highly regarded leader in the field of multicultural psychology, counseling, and therapy- this much-needed book shows how each of us has had a role in the oppression of others and outlines the steps we need to take to overcome our racism. Using this book as a guide, you can clearly see your own racism and overcome your prejudices on a very personal level. You can learn to take responsibility for your most intimate attitudes and understand where they came from. Once reaching this point, you can go on to discover the various cultures in the United States by reading and by associating with strong and healthy individuals of color. Then you can experience the reality of their lives, personalize your understanding with guides and advisers, and eventually transform yourself to become an ally, activist, teacher, and student, working toward mutually shared goals in equal-status relationships. This exceptional and challenging book will inspire you to take this rewarding journey and become less afraid and intimidated by differences, learn to communicate more openly with family, friends, and coworkers, increase your appreciation of people of all colors and cultures in our pluralistic society, and feel a sense of unity and interconnectedness with all humanity.
Flap Copy
If you are white and live in America, the odds are_ no matter what your economic status or educational background_ you are a racist! However painful and embarrassing to admit, we all have innate, long-standing, and instinctive attitudes, stereotypes, and prejudices toward other ethnic and racial groups. Overcoming Our Racism is an extraordinary book that helps you_ no matter what your race or ethnic origin_ make an honest appraisal of yourself and your biases and prejudices and guides you on your journey to becoming a person who truly values inclusion, respect, fairness, and the upholding of social justice. Written by Derald Wing Sue_ a pioneer and highly regarded leader in the field of multicultural psychology, counseling, and therapy_ this much-needed book shows how each of us has had a role in the oppression of others and outlines the steps we need to take to overcome our racism. Using this book as a guide, you can clearly see your own racism and overcome your prejudices on a very personal level. You can learn to take responsibility for your most intimate attitudes and understand where they came from. Once reaching this point, you can go on to discover the various cultures in the United States by reading and by associating with strong and healthy individuals of color. Then you can experience the reality of their lives, personalize your understanding with guides and advisers, and eventually transform yourself to become an ally, activist, teacher, and student, working toward mutually shared goals in equal-status relationships. This exceptional and challenging book will inspire you to take this rewarding journey and become less afraid and intimidated by differences, learn to communicate more openly with family, friends, and coworkers, increase your appreciation of people of all colors and cultures in our pluralistic society, and feel a sense of unity and interconnectedness with all humanity.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2003-07-15:
This uncompromising anti-racist manifesto written for a white audience is concerned less with Klansmen and skinheads than with the white woman clutching her purse when minority teenagers draw near; the white man flinching at getting in an elevator full of black men; even the well-meaning but patronizing liberal teacher in a ghetto school.] Sue, a Chinese-American psychologist, argues that the countless daily slights inflicted by such "unconscious and unintentional racists," do more harm to minorities than the occasional hate-crime. He reveals the subtle but pervasive bias against minorities in the economy, the media, school system, even the subconscious mind (whites have involuntary negative reactions when flashed subliminal images of black faces), and shows how the "invisible whiteness of being" allows whites to remain oblivious to the privileges they enjoy. The book demands that whites "accept responsibility for [their] whiteness," and includes suggested readings, videotapes, and exercises to help whites unearth and deal with their biases and learn to mingle with minorities. It includes a seven-phase program for reconstructing a non-racist white identity, culminating in a conversion experience, complete with emotional catharsis and adoption of a "second family" of minorities and other "liberated whites." Whites may bridle at Sue's accusatory tone and find the recovery-movement tone of his remedy off-putting. But many will feel a painful shock of recognition at his subtle but unsparing analysis of everyday racism, and find this provocative book a compelling challenge to their complacency. (July) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, July 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
"'We shall overcome,' but how? Derald Wing Sue points us to a path. He invites readers to engage him in dialogues to confront the master narrative of American history- the story that this country was settled by European immigrants and that Americans are white.Taking us beyond the Black and White binary, he illuminates the experiences of Americans of the twenty-first century's society of expanding ethnic diversity." -Ronald Takaki, author, A Different Mirror: A History of Multicultural America "This book is intended to provoke and challenge, and it succeeds admirably. Sometimes it even made me angry, but it always forced me to think about myself and assess the way I behave." - Arthur Levine, Ph.D., president, Teachers College, Columbia University "Dr. Sue is mapping a warrior's path with a compassionate heart.This book will take the discussion of racism in our society to a new level in which we can finally begin to address it in a manner that will bring deep changes and not just more rhetoric." -Eduardo Duran, Ph.D., Apache/Tewa, author, Buddha in Redface "Most of us have internalized attitudes that affect our actions in negative and unfair ways toward people of color. Sue's book allows us to understand those attitudes as well as the white privilege most White Americans do not realize they possess! All thinking people who wish to increase integrity in their interactions with others should read this book!" -Melba J. T. Vasquez, Ph.D., ABPP, past president, American Psychological Association's Society for the Psychology of Women "This singular book provides racially clueless and sometimes well-meaning people with the tools and context to liberate themselves- and the rest of us- from their destructive ways. Though the book centers on racism and whiteness, it also gives an insightful approach to other biased behavior, whether based on gender, sexual orientation, age, disability, or other common markers of prejudice. Most important, this book offers all of us the hope that constructive change is not only possible but within our capacity to achieve." -Helen Zia, author, Asian American Dreams: The Emergence of An American People
Long Description
"2We shall overcome,2 but how? Derald Wing Sue points us to a path. He invites readers to engage him in dialogues to confront the master narrative of American history- the story that this country was settled by European immigrants and that Americans are white.Taking us beyond the Black and White binary, he illuminates the experiences of Americans of the twenty-first century2s society of expanding ethnic diversity." -Ronald Takaki, author, A Different Mirror: A History of Multicultural America "This book is intended to provoke and challenge, and it succeeds admirably. Sometimes it even made me angry, but it always forced me to think about myself and assess the way I behave." - Arthur Levine, Ph.D., president, Teachers College, Columbia University "Dr. Sue is mapping a warrior2s path with a compassionate heart.This book will take the discussion of racism in our society to a new level in which we can finally begin to address it in a manner that will bring deep changes and not just more rhetoric." -Eduardo Duran, Ph.D., Apache/Tewa, author, Buddha in Redface "Most of us have internalized attitudes that affect our actions in negative and unfair ways toward people of color. Sue2s book allows us to understand those attitudes as well as the white privilege most White Americans do not realize they possess! All thinking people who wish to increase integrity in their interactions with others should read this book!" -Melba J. T. Vasquez, Ph.D., ABPP, past president, American Psychological Association2s Society for the Psychology of Women "This singular book provides racially clueless and sometimes well-meaning people with the tools and context to liberate themselves- and the rest of us- from their destructive ways. Though the book centers on racism and whiteness, it also gives an insightful approach to other biased behavior, whether based on gender, sexual orientation, age, disability, or other common markers of prejudice. Most important, this book offers all of us the hope that constructive change is not only possible but within our capacity to achieve." -Helen Zia, author, Asian American Dreams: The Emergence of An American People
Main Description
This extraordinary book by Derald Wing Sue, a highly-regarded academic and author, helps readers understand and combat racism in themselves. It defines racism not only as extreme acts of hatred, but as "any attitude, action or institutional structure or social policy that subordinates a person or group because of their color." This landmark work offers an antidote to this pervasive social problem. Shows how each of us has a role in the oppression of others, and what we can do about it Offers a way to overcome racism on a very intimate level Outlines specific guidelines and suggested activities
Bowker Data Service Summary
Aiming to help readers understand and combat racism in themselves, this book defines racism not only as extreme acts of hatred, but as any attitude, action or institutional structure or social policy that subordinates a person or group because of their colour.
Back Cover Copy
"'We shall overcome,' but how? Derald Wing Sue points us to a path. He invites readers to engage him in dialogues to confront the master narrative of American history- the story that this country was settled by European immigrants and that Americans are white.Taking us beyond the Black and White binary, he illuminates the experiences of Americans of the twenty-first century's society of expanding ethnic diversity." - Ronald Takaki , author, A Different Mirror: A History of Multicultural America "This book is intended to provoke and challenge, and it succeeds admirably. Sometimes it even made me angry, but it always forced me to think about myself and assess the way I behave." - Arthur Levine , Ph.D., president, Teachers College, Columbia University "Dr. Sue is mapping a warrior's path with a compassionate heart.This book will take the discussion of racism in our society to a new level in which we can finally begin to address it in a manner that will bring deep changes and not just more rhetoric." - Eduardo Duran , Ph.D., Apache/Tewa, author, Buddha in Redface "Most of us have internalized attitudes that affect our actions in negative and unfair ways toward people of color. Sue's book allows us to understand those attitudes as well as the white privilege most White Americans do not realize they possess! All thinking people who wish to increase integrity in their interactions with others should read this book!" - Melba J. T. Vasquez , Ph.D., ABPP, past president, American Psychological Association's Society for the Psychology of Women "This singular book provides racially clueless and sometimes well-meaning people with the tools and context to liberate themselves- and the rest of us- from their destructive ways. Though the book centers on racism and whiteness, it also gives an insightful approach to other biased behavior, whether based on gender, sexual orientation, age, disability, or other common markers of prejudice. Most important, this book offers all of us the hope that constructive change is not only possible but within our capacity to achieve." - Helen Zia , author, Asian American Dreams: The Emergence of An American People
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xi
The Problem
Are You a Racist?p. 3
What Is Racism?p. 23
Do You Oppress?p. 45
What Is Your Racial Reality and That of White America?p. 71
Isn't Racism a White Problem?p. 97
What Does It Mean to Be White?p. 115
What Is White Privilege?p. 137
Overcoming the Problem
How Do You Develop a Nonracist White Identity?p. 163
What Must You Do to Combat Racism?p. 191
What Must Society Do to Combat Racism?p. 231
What Must People of Color Do to Overcome Racism? A Personal Message to My Brothers and Sisters of Colorp. 255
Epiloguep. 277
Notesp. 281
About the Authorp. 287
Indexp. 289
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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