Catalogue


Run, boy, run : a novel /
by Uri Orlev ; translated from the Hebrew by Hillel Halkin.
edition
1st American ed.
imprint
Boston : Houghton Mifflin, 2003.
description
186 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0618164650
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Boston : Houghton Mifflin, 2003.
isbn
0618164650
general note
"Walter Lorraine books."
abstract
Based on the true story of a nine-year-old boy who escapes the Warsaw Ghetto and must survive throughout the war in the Nazi-occupied Polish countryside.
catalogue key
5195937
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Garden State Teen Book Award, USA, 2006 : Nominated
Mildred L. Batchelder Award, USA, 2004 : Won
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2003-12-22:
Orlev (The Island on Bird Street), an award-winning writer and Holocaust survivor who now lives in Israel, devotes this memorable novel to the extraordinary true story of an orphaned Jewish boy's experiences in Poland during the war. As in most such tales, eight-year-old Srulik's account combines encounters with the unfathomably cruel and the genuinely charitable. Readers who have some familiarity with Holocaust memoirs will not be surprised by stunning coincidences and improbable events; others may grasp that survival against nearly insuperable odds depended on not one but many unlikely twists of fate. For example, Srulik-who escapes from the Warsaw Ghetto toward the beginning of the novel, survives in the forest, works for farmers and learns to pass for Christian-is later turned in to the Nazis and runs away; when he finds work again, his new boss brings him to town to register him (for the benefit of increased rations) and unwittingly delivers Srulik back to the same Nazi officer who had interrogated him. But the officer, who knows Srulik is Jewish, doesn't arrest him; rather, he sends him to work for his girlfriend. Later, when Srulik's arm is mangled on the job, a Polish doctor refuses to operate because Srulik is a Jew, and Srulik's arm must eventually be amputated. Srulik's response typifies his reactions throughout: he doesn't have the luxury of assessing his losses, or mourning them, he simply figures out how to manage with what he has left. It is this perspective-authentic, childlike and wrenching-that will pierce the audience's heart. Ages 10-up. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Orlev...devotes this memorable novel to the extraordinary true story of an orphaned Jewish boy's experiences in Poland during the war."
"Part of the strength of Orlev's writing rests with its spareness...in this novel of heartbreaking resilience."
"The narrative is simple and spare, factual about everything from hunting with a slingshot to making a fire with a piece of glass, and it's always true to the viewpoint of a boy who thinks he's 'about nine.'"
"The novel has obvious relevance fro studies of the Holocaust." KLIATT 11/01/07 KLIATT
"...the story is totally engrossing as it vividly describes the hardships faced by so many youngsters during the war. Orlev has once again successfully used historical fiction to illustrate the Holocaust experience."
"This is one of the better examples of Holocaust fiction in depicting the vagaries of human nature as villainous and heroic acts emerge unexpectedly, even casually, from a shifting wartime population threatened with catastrophe."
"Mesmorizing and memorable." Kirkus Reviews, Starred "The narrative is simple and spare, factual about everything from hunting with a slingshot to making a fire with a piece of glass, and it's always true to the viewpoint of a boy who thinks he's 'about nine.'" Booklist, ALA, Starred Review "...the story is totally engrossing as it vividly describes the hardships faced by so many youngsters during the war. Orlev has once again successfully used historical fiction to illustrate the Holocaust experience." School Library Journal "Part of the strength of Orlev's writing rests with its spareness...in this novel of heartbreaking resilience." Horn Book "This is one of the better examples of Holocaust fiction in depicting the vagaries of human nature as villainous and heroic acts emerge unexpectedly, even casually, from a shifting wartime population threatened with catastrophe." The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books "Orlev...devotes this memorable novel to the extraordinary true story of an orphaned Jewish boy's experiences in Poland during the war." Publishers Weekly
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Booklist, October 2003
Horn Book Magazine, November 2003
School Library Journal, November 2003
Publishers Weekly, December 2003
Voice of Youth Advocates, December 2003
Horn Book Guide, April 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Library
Based on the true story of a nine-year-old boy who escapes the Warsaw Ghetto and must survive throughout the war in the Nazi-occupied Polish countryside.
Main Description
Run, Boy, Run is the extraordinary account of one boy's survival of the Holocaust. Srulik is only eight years old when he finds himself all alone in the Warsaw ghetto. He escapes into the countryside where he spends the ensuing years hiding in the forest, dependent on the sympathies and generosity of the poor farmers in the surrounding area. Despite the seemingly insurmountable odds, several chases, captures, attempted executions, and even the loss of his arm, Srulik miraculously survives.
Main Description
"'Srulik, there's no time. I want you to remember what I'm going to tell you. You have to stay alive. You have to! Get someone to teach you how to act like a Christian, how to cross yourself and pray. . . . The most important thing, Srulik,' he said, talking fast, 'is to forget your name. Wipe it from your memory. . . . But even if you forget everything--even if you forget me and Mama--never forget that you're a Jew.'" And so, at only eight years old, Srulik Frydman says goodbye to his father for the last time and becomes Jurek Staniak, an orphan on the run in the Polish countryside at the height of the Holocaust. With the danger of capture by German soldiers ever-present, Jurek must fight against starvation, the punishing Polish winters, and widespread anti-Semitism as he desperately searches for refuge. Told with the unflinching honesty and unique perspective of such a young child, Run, Boy, Run is the extraordinary account of one boy's struggle to stay alive in the face of almost insurmountable odds--a story all the more incredible because it is true.
Bowker Data Service Summary
At eight years old Srulik Frydman said goodbye to his father for the last time and became Jurek Staniak, an orphan on the run in the Polish countryside at the height of the Holocaust. Jurek must fight against starvation, the punishing winters and widespread anti-Semitism as he searches for refuge.

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