Catalogue


The Jews of New Jersey : a pictorial history /
Patricia M. Ard and Michael Aaron Rockland.
imprint
New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2002.
description
xiii, 138 p. : ill., 1 map ; 26 cm.
ISBN
0813530121 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2002.
isbn
0813530121 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5189298
A Look Inside
About the Author
BIH Author Biography
Patricia M. Ard is an assistant professor of English at Ramapo College and the editor of Juanita: A Romance of Real Life in Cuba Fifty Years Ago. Michael Aaron Rockland is a professor of American studies at Rutgers University and the author of Snowshoeing through Sewers and coauthor of Looking for America on the New Jersey Turnpike (both from Rutgers University Press).
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Jews have called New Jersey home since the late seventeenth century, and they currently make up almost 6 percent of the state's residents. Yet, until now, no book has paid tribute to the richness of Jewish heritage in the Garden State. The Jews of New Jersey: A Pictorial History redresses this lack with a lively narrative and hundreds of archival and family photographs - many rare-that bring this history to life. Patricia Ard and Michael Rockland focus on representative Jewish communities throughout the state, paying particular attention to the extraordinary stories of ordinary people. Through the joys and struggles of homemakers, storekeepers, factory workers, athletes, children, farmers, activists, religious leaders, and Holocaust survivors, the authors tell the stories of how these communities have evolved, thrived, and changed. They note the difficulties posed by intermarriage and assimilation and, at the same time, depict a burgeoning revival of Jewish orthodoxy and traditions. The Jews of New Jersey will please both the historian and general reader. Its heartwarming stories and pictures truly make the point that it is through the joys, triumphs, and defeats of everyday people that history is made.
Reviews
Review Quotes
Ard and Rockland. . . elected to tell this story through the experiences of ordinary people and to eschew the frequently pandering practice of concentrating on highly successful and visible Jews. . . .And one pores over the scores of photographsùmany of them from the 19th and early 20th centuriesùstudying the faces, the clothing and the details of grocery stores and factories. . . . This volume is a previously unheard-of effort to chronicle the Jewish experience in a crossroads state. . . . . And the pictures are haunting and charming and, by themselves, worth a look.
A sort of photo album. Ard and Rockland focus mainly on storekeepers, farmers, children, homemakers and factory workers. There are wonderful photos of WeingartenÆs Corset Factory in Newark, for example, and of Fanny Dubnik with chicks at her poultry farm in Farmingdale.
In this book, the authors tell a familiar American Jewish tale of poor immigrants establishing themselves in the crowded cores of American cities (in this case Newark, Camden and Paterson) before striking out for the suburbs. There are stories of retail triumphs and labor struggles, but there are also more unusual tales with a surprisingly utopian theme. Of the 40 Jewish agricultural settlements founded in North America . . . about 30 were in New Jersey. . . . The dozens of photographs are a marvelous family album of scrubbed children, proud grocers and stiff-backed soldiers. There isnÆt a turnpike exit in sight.
Offers the reader a glimpse into the rich culture and history of New Jersey Jewish community. . . . Attention is given to ordinary people in these communities who share stories of their joy and triumphs.
Presents little-known but comprehensive histories of the stateÆs Jewish communities.
The bookÆs photographs will walk readers through the early Jewish communities of major New Jersey cities and suburbs. Whether they were nurses caring for infants at Beth Israel Hospital in Newark; silk workers at their looms in Paterson; bakers making challahs in Trenton; farmers raising chickens in Monmouth county; garment workers sewing in Roosevelt . . . Jews contributed enormously to the life of the state. . . . But perhaps what moved Ard and Rockland the most while creating the book are the family bonds that last through time and continue to form and strengthen the Jewish people.
The Jews of New Jersey . . . offers the reader a glimpse into the rich culture and history of New JerseyÆs Jewish community.
This is a picture book that provides sketches of various aspects of Jewish life before Jews became more like the rest of America. . . . Readers should find The Jews of New Jersey both entertaining and informative.
Two New Jersey professors have collected hundreds of pictures and stories from these immigrants and their descendants. . . . The book chronicles the assimilation of the immigrants, who modified old traditions to fit the American circumstance. As education and acculturation increased, Jews became increasingly active in New JerseyÆs social and political life.
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Summaries
Back Cover Copy
"We ... decided that this would be a book not about famous New Jersey Jews but about the texture of everyday life of New Jersey's 460,000 Jews and their ancestors. We were not interested in celebraing this Jewish scientist, that Jewish poet, or in constructing yet another book full of revelations that such-and-such a movie star or politician or athlete is/was Jewish. We believe the Jewish community has become sufficiently self-confident and mature, and that America has become sufficiently accepting of Jews, that it is no longer necessary to engage in this form of Jewish public relations." - from The Jews of New Jersey: A Pictorial History Places included in The Jews of New Jersey: Newark, Paterson, Trenton, and Camden Southern New Jersey farming communities The Hasidic community in Morristown The artists' colony of Roosevelt in Monmouth County Beach towns such as Deal and Bradley Beach New Brunswick/Highland Park Postwar suburbs such as the Oranges, Cherry Hill, and Short Hills.
Main Description
Jews have called New Jersey home since the late seventeenth century, and they currently make up almost 6 percent of the states residents. Yet, until now, no book has paid tribute to the richness of Jewish heritage in the Garden State. The Jews of New Jersey: A Pictorial History redresses this lack with a lively narrative and hundreds of archival and family photographsmany rarethat bring this history to life. Patricia Ard and Michael Rockland focus on representative Jewish communities throughout the state, paying particular attention to the extraordinary stories of ordinary people. Through the joys and struggles of homemakers, storekeepers, factory workers, athletes, children, farmers, activists, religious leaders, and Holocaust survivors, the authors tell the stories of how these communities have evolved, thrived, and changed. They note the difficulties posed by intermarriage and assimilation and, at the same time, depict a burgeoning revival of Jewish orthodoxy and traditions. The Jews of New Jersey will please both the historian and general reader. Its heartwarming stories and pictures truly make the point that it is through the joys, triumphs, and defeats of everyday people that history is made.
Publisher Fact Sheet
A pictorial history of Jewish settlement in New Jersey, from the 17th century to the present day.
Unpaid Annotation
Jews have called New Jersey home since the late seventeenth century, and they currently make up almost 6 percent of the state's residents. Yet, until now, no book available has paid tribute to the richness of Jewish heritage in the Garden State. The Jews of New Jersey: A Pictorial History redresses this lack with a lively narrative and hundreds of archival and family photographs -- many rare -- that bring this history to life.Patricia M. Ard and Michael Aaron Rockland focus on representative Jewish communities throughout the state, paying particular attention to the extraordinary stories of ordinary people. Through the joys and struggles of homemakers, storekeepers, factory workers, athletes, children, farmers, activists, religious leaders, and Holocaust survivors, the authors tell the stories of how these communities have evolved, thrived, and changed. They note the difficulties posed by intermarriage and assimilation and, at the same time, depict a burgeoning revival of Jewish orthodoxy and traditions.The Jews of New Jersey will please both the historian and general reader. Its heartwarming stories and pictures truly make the point that it is through the joys, triumphs, and defeats of everyday people that history is made.

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