Catalogue

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The heart of revolution : the radical life and novels of Olive Dargan /
Kathy Cantley Ackerman.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Knoxville : University of Tennessee Press, c2004.
description
xix, 237 p. : port. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1572332433 (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Knoxville : University of Tennessee Press, c2004.
isbn
1572332433 (acid-free paper)
catalogue key
5185852
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 217-229) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
A published poet, Kathy Cantley Ackerman is Writer-in-Residence at Isothermal Community College in Spindale, North Carolina. She lives in Charlotte
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Despite the timeless themes of Olive Tilford Dargan's work and the acclaim she earned with her novels Call Home the Heart (1932) and A Stone Came Rolling (1935), the author, who published her best-known works under the pseudonym Fielding Burke, has been largely forgotten by the American literary establishment. In this first book-length study of Dargan's life and work, Kathy Cantley Ackerman poses these questions: Why did Dargan's proletarian and feminist writings fall out of public favor when the literary climate changed in the 1940s, and what are the issues raised in and by her work that today's readers should reconsider? The Heart of Revolution combines biography and history with a critical reading of Dargan's work. Ackerman pays close attention to the proletarian, feminist, and racial issues in the novels; she then examines the ways these issues intersect in the southern Appalachian and Piedmont regions. Dargan's aesthetic, articulated in her depiction of the southern textile mill strikes of 1929 and the early 1930s, defies the party line of the period that privileged the struggle of white working men over the concerns of women and minorities. Unlike her male-and many of her female-counterparts in the proletarian movement, Dargan envisions a world in which romantic love can coexist with the fight for socioeconomic revolution, a world in which the activist does not have to surrender her individuality. Through strong female characters, she reconstructs the paternalistic, capitalistic marriage-and-mother myth, replacing it with a model based on egalitarian principles-an ideology that has only gained relevance over time. Ackerman's exploration of class, race, and gender in Dargan's novels individually and her consideration of Dargan's work as a whole reveal the complicated reasons for the novelist's neglect and present a compelling argument for reevaluation of her fiction. A published poet, Kathy Cantley Ackerman is Writer-in-Residence at Isothermal Community College in Spindale, North Carolina. She lives in Charlotte.
Main Description
The Heart of Revolution The Radical Life and Novels of Olive Dargan Kathy Cantley Ackerman Despite the timeless themes of Olive Tilford Dargan's work and the acclaim she earned with her novels Call Home the Heart (1932) and A Stone Came Rolling (1935), the author, who published her best-known works under the pseudonym Fielding Burke, has been largely forgotten by the American literary establishment. In this first book-length study of Dargan's life and work, Kathy Cantley Ackerman poses these questions: Why did Dargan's proletarian and feminist writings fall out of public favor when the literary climate changed in the 1940s, and what are the issues raised in and by her work that today's readers should reconsider? The Heart of Revolution combines biography and history with a critical reading of Dargan's work. Ackerman pays close attention to the proletarian, feminist, and racial issues in the novels; she then examines the ways these issues intersect in the southern Appalachian and Piedmont regions. Dargan's aesthetic, articulated in her depiction of the southern textile mill strikes of 1929 and the early 1930s, defies the party line of the period that privileged the struggle of white working men over the concerns of women and minorities. Unlike her male-and many of her female-counterparts in the proletarian movement, Dargan envisions a world in which romantic love can coexist with the fight for socioeconomic revolution, a world in which the activist does not have to surrender her individuality. Through strong female characters, she reconstructs the paternalistic, capitalistic marriage-and-mother myth, replacing it with a model based on egalitarian principles-an ideology that has only gained relevance over time. Ackerman's exploration of class, race, and gender in Dargan's novels individually and her consideration of Dargan's work as a whole reveal the complicated reasons for the novelist's neglect and present a compelling argument for reevaluation of her fiction.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. xi
Facing the Storm: Olive Tilford Dargan, 1869-1921p. 1
From Her Highest Hill, 1922-1968p. 19
Olive Dargan and the Proletarian Movementp. 45
"Horror that had laughter in it": Gastonia, North Carolina, 1929p. 67
Feminism and Labor in the Gastonia Novelsp. 77
Call Home the Heart: The Issue of Race, Revolution, and the Feminist Quest of Ishma Waycasterp. 99
A Stone Came Rolling: Marriage, Religion, and the Evolution of the Proletariatp. 135
Sons of the Stranger: Toward a Proletarian Romancep. 157
Olive Dargan and the Criticsp. 175
Conclusionp. 205
Notesp. 211
Works Citedp. 217
Indexp. 231
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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