Catalogue


Workers and warriors : masculinity and the struggle for nation in South Africa /
Thembisa Waetjen.
imprint
Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2004.
description
viii, 158 p.
ISBN
0252029089 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2004.
isbn
0252029089 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5181509
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Thembisa Waetjen most recently taught as a visiting lecturer in the Department of Historical Studies at the University of Natal, Durban.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-01-01:
Zulu nationalism failed. It provided no viable substitute for a broader, more inclusive South African nationalism. Waetjen claims that the appeal of Zulu nationalism was inadequate because it could not reach Zulu males across "entrenched" social and geographical divides. The Inkatha Freedom Party--Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi's vehicle for the realization of his political aspirations--could not appeal across those divides, especially the divides of class. The author also asserts that amid Zulu nationalism, masculinity was a source of fragmentation as well as cohesion. Her slim book devotes a chapter to Buthelezi's last-ditch battle against the ascendancy of Nelson Mandela's African National Congress; another chapter to the Zulus under the pre-apartheid government of Natal; a third to the nature of society in the Zulu homeland during apartheid; and a fourth and fifth to Zulu masculinity in the (mining) workplace and at home. Her conclusion takes feminist theory to task, stating that the "unsettled status of men rather than their uncontested dominance" gives nationalism its power in the Zulu case. Waetjen's rewriting of the gender experience will be central to future analyses of African society. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Graduate students and faculty. R. I. Rotberg Harvard University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Thembisa Waetjen has written a dramatic and illuminating study of masculinity and politics, with relevance far wider than the remarkable case of Zulu nationalism. This book casts fresh light on ethnic appeals, nation-building, authority, and gender identities. It develops a new line of thought about the limits of masculine ideology in overcoming social divisions. This is an important contribution to our understanding of gender, development, and nationality."-- R. W. Connell, author ofMasculinities and Gender and Power: Society, the Person and Sexual Politics
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Waetjen explores how gender structured the mobilization of Zulu nationalism in South Africa as antiapartheid efforts gained force during the 1980s. The book casts fresh light on ethnic appeals, nation-building, authority, & gender identities, while developing new arguments about the limits of masculine ideology.
Main Description
In this compact, powerful new study Thembisa Waetjen explores how gender structured the mobilization of Zulu nationalism in South Africa as antiapartheid efforts gained force during the 1980s. Undercutting assumptions of male power and nationalism as monolithic,Workers and Warriorsdemonstrates the ways that masculinities may be plural, conflict-ridden, and crucial not only to the formation of loyalty but also to why some nationalisms fail.
Main Description
The agency of men in violent ethnic conflict has raised urgent questions about the relationship between gender, nationalism, and modern social life. In this compact study, Thembisa Waetjen explores how gender structured the mobilization of Zulu nationalism in South Africa, where ethnic communitarian and liberal democratic conceptions of nation competed for dominance as antiapartheid efforts gained force during the 1980s. As its title suggests, Workers and Warriors argues that political struggles fought out in lethal battles between men -- struggles over the nature of political authority and citizenship, territorial sovereignty and cultural tradition, industrial relationships and street-level control -- were necessarily bound up with struggles over the changing meaning of male gender identities, power, and practices in conditions of rapid social change. Waetjen reveals how a regional history of class formation, ethnic segregation, the making of a migrant labor force, and modes of state rule crucially shaped the social location and identities of rural African men and women, creating opportunities -- as well as powerful dilemmas -- for South Africa's politics of liberation and reconstruction. Drawing on official documents and speeches, she demonstrates the significance of gender as a sociological category shaping the course of the Zulu nationalist movement, Inkatha. Undercutting assumptions of male power and nationalism as monolithic forces, this study demonstrates the ways that masculinities may be plural, conflict-ridden, and crucial not only to the formation of political loyalty but also to why some nationalisms fail. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Introductionp. 1
Inkatha, Chief Buthelezi, and the Politics of Zulu Nationalismp. 11
From Agrarian Patriarchy to Patriarchal Capitalism: Gender and Ethnicity in Historical Perspectivep. 30
The "Home" in Homeland: Gender and National Spacep. 51
Unsettled Patriarchy: Conflicts over Political Authority and Masculine Identityp. 69
Zulu Masculinity in the Marketplace of Strugglep. 93
Conclusion: Gender and Nationalismp. 121
Notesp. 135
Bibliographyp. 147
Indexp. 155
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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