Catalogue


Writing Russia in the age of Shakespeare /
Daryl W. Palmer.
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2004.
description
xxiii, 256 p. : ill.
ISBN
0754638472 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2004.
isbn
0754638472 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5167977
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Daryl W. Palmer is Associate Professor of English at Regis University in Denver, CO.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
This study commences with a simple question: how did Russia matter to England in the age of William Shakespeare? In order to answer the question, the author studies stories of Lapland survival, diplomatic envoys, merchant transactions, and plays for the public theaters of London. At the heart of every chapter, Shakespeare and his contemporaries are seen questioning the status of writing in English, what it can and cannot accomplish under the influence of humanism, capitalism, and early modern science. The phrase 'Writing Russia' stands for the way these English writers attempted to advance themselves by conjuring up versions of Russian life. Each man wrote out of a joint-stock arrangement, and each man's relative success and failure tells us much about the way Russia mattered to England.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Part of the 'Studies in European Culture Transition' series, this text answers the question: how did Russia matter to England in the Renaissance?
Unpaid Annotation
This study commences with a simple question: how did Russia matter to England in the age of William Shakespeare? In order to answer the question, the author studies stories of Lapland survival, diplomatic envoys, merchant transactions and plays for the public theaters of London. At the heart of every chapter, Shakespeare and his contemporaries are seen questioning the status of writing in English, what it can and cannot accomplish under the influence of humanism, capitalism, and early modern science. The phrase "Writing Russia" stands for the way these English writers attempted to advance themselves by conjuring up versions of Russian life.
Main Description
This study commences with a simple question: how did Russia matter to England in the age of William Shakespeare? In order to answer the question, the author studies stories of Lapland survival, diplomatic envoys, merchant transactions, and plays for the public theaters of London. At the heart of every chapter, Shakespeare and his contemporaries are seen questioning the status of writing in English, what it can and cannot accomplish under the influence of humanism, capitalism, and early modern science. The phrase Writing Russia stands for the way these English writers attempted to advance themselves by conjuring up versions of Russian life. Each man wrote out of a joint-stock arrangement, and each man's relative success and failure tells us much about the way Russia mattered to England.
Table of Contents
General Editors' Prefacep. vi
Prefacep. vii
Acknowledgementsp. xxi
Chronologyp. xxii
List of Illustrationsp. xxiv
Note on the Textsp. xxv
Permissionsp. xxvi
Inventing the Venture: England and Russia at Mid-centuryp. 1
Ivan IV, Elizabeth I, and the Dispatch of Anthony Jenkinsonp. 45
Writing the Envoy: William Shakespeare's Love's Labour's Lost and the Reasons Against Readingp. 71
Writing Large: The Case of Jerome Horsey, Individualistp. 97
Writing Ardor: The Submissions of Giles Fletcherp. 129
'With the Emperor of Russia': Subjection and Withdrawal in William Shakespeare's Measure for Measurep. 155
Imperial Tyranny and the Daughter's Seclusion in William Shakespeare's The Winter's Talep. 179
The King's Men's Version of Muscovy: John Fletcher's The Loyal Subjectp. 203
Epilogue: Knowledge, Permutation, and John Tradescant's Rosesp. 233
Bibliographyp. 237
Indexp. 251
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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