Catalogue


Women and politics in early modern England, 1450-1700 /
edited by James Daybell.
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2004.
description
xv, 268 p. : ill.
ISBN
075460988X (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2004.
isbn
075460988X (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5166830
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Tricia Bracher is the holder of research fellowships at the Folger Shakespeare and Henry E. Huntington Libraries, and is currently writing the first full-length study of the life and works of Esther Inglis Elizabeth Clarke is Reader in English at Warwick University, where she is Director of the Perdita Project James Daybell, is Assistant Professor in Medieval and Early Modern History at Central Michigan University Jerome de Groot is Lecturer in English at Keele University Susan Frye, Professor of English at the University of Wyoming Barbara J. Harris is Professor of History and Women's Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Lynne Magnusson, Professor of English at the University of Toronto Natalie Mears is a Lecturer in Early Modern History at the University of Durham Helen Payne is currently a Visiting Research Fellow in the Discipline of History, School of History and Politics, University of Adelaide, South Australia Karen Robertson, Associate Professor of English and Women's Studies at Vassar College Sara Jayne Steen, Dean of the College of Letters and Science and Professor of English at Montana State University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
A blend of traditional Tudor history and insights from feminist theory this volume is not a definitive study of women and politics. Rather it presents essays that are concerned with socially elite women, well-connected aristocrats and literate women of the 'middling sort' during the early modern period.
Main Description
This collection of essays examines women's involvement in politics in early modern England, as writers, as members of kinship and patronage networks, and as petitioners, intermediaries and patrons. It challenges conventional conceptualizations of female power and influence, defining 'politics' broadly in order to incorporate women excluded from formal, male-dominated state institutions. The chapters embrace a range of interdisciplinary approaches: historical, literary, palaeographic, linguistic and gender based. They deal with a variety of issues related to female intervention within political spheres, including women's rhetorical, persuasive and communicative skills; the production by women of a range of texts that can be termed 'political'; the politicization of marital, family and kinship networks; and female involvement in patronage and court politics. It also looks at ways in which images of female power and authority were represented in canonical texts, such as Shakespeare's plays and Milton's epic poetry.
Long Description
This collection of essays examines women's involvement in politics in early modern England, as writers, as members of kinship and patronage networks, and as petitioners, intermediaries and patrons. It challenges conventional conceptualizations of female power and influence, defining 'politics' broadly in order to incorporate women excluded from formal, male-dominated state institutions.The chapters embrace a range of interdisciplinary approaches: historical, literary, palaeographic, linguistic and gender based. They deal with a variety of issues related to female intervention within political spheres, including women's rhetorical, persuasive and communicative skills; the production by women of a range of texts that can be termed 'political'; the politicization of marital, family and kinship networks; and female involvement in patronage and court politics. Women and Politics in Early Modern England, 1450-700 also looks at ways in which images of female power and authority were represented within canonical texts, such as Shakespeare's plays and Milton's epic poetry.The volume extends the range of areas and texts for the study of women, gender and politics, and locates women's political, social and cultural activities within the contexts of the family, locality and wider national stage. It argues for a blurring of the boundaries between the traditional categories of the 'public' and the 'private,' the 'domestic' and the 'political'; and enhances our understanding of the ways in which women exerted political force through informal, intimate and personal, as well as more official, and formal channels of power.As a whole the book makes an important contribution to the reassessment of early modern politics from the perspective of women.
Unpaid Annotation
This collection of essays examines women's involvement in politics in early modern England as writers, members of kinship and patronage networks and as petitioners, intermediaries and patrons. It challenges conventional conceptualizations of female power and influence, defining "politics" broadly in order to incorporate women excluded from formal, male-dominated state institutions. The chapters embrace a range of interdisciplinary approaches: historical, literary, paleographic, linguistic and gender based. They deal with a variety of issues related to female intervention within political spheres, including women's rhetorical, persuasive and communicative skills; the production by women of a range of texts that can be termed "political"; the politicization of marital, family and kinship networks; and female involvement in patronage and court politics. Women and Politics in Early Modern England, 1450-1700 also looks at ways in which images of female power and authority were represented within canonical texts, such as Shakespeare's plays and Milton's epic poetry.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. vii
Notes on Contributorsp. viii
Acknowledgementsp. xi
List of Abbreviationsp. xiii
Introduction: Rethinking Women and Politics in Early Modern Englandp. 1
Sisterhood, Friendship and the Power of English Aristocratic Women, 1450-1550p. 21
A Rhetoric of Requests: Genre and Linguistic Scripts in Elizabethan Women's Suitors' Lettersp. 51
Politics in the Elizabethan Privy Chamber: Lady Mary Sidney and Kat Ashleyp. 67
Portingale Women and Politics in Late Elizabethan Londonp. 83
Negotiating Favour: the Letters of Lady Raleghp. 99
'Suche newes as on the Quenes hye wayes we have mett': the News and Intelligence Networks of Elizabeth Talbot, countess of Shrewsbury (c.1527-1608)p. 114
Esther Inglis and the English Succession Crisis of 1599p. 132
The Cavendish-Talbot Women: Playing a High-Stakes Gamep. 147
Aristocratic Women, Power, Patronage and Family Networks at the Jacobean Court, 1603-1625p. 164
Anne of Denmark and the Historical Contextualisation of Shakespeare and Fletcher's Henry VIIIp. 181
Mothers, Lovers and Others: Royalist Womenp. 194
Beyond Microhistory: the Use of Women's Manuscripts in a Widening Political Arenap. 211
Loyal and Dutiful Subjects: English Nuns and Stuart Politicsp. 228
Assuming Gentility: Thomas Middleton, Mary Carleton and Aphra Behnp. 243
Indexp. 257
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem