Catalogue

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Women at the front : hospital workers in Civil War America /
Jane E. Schultz.
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2004.
description
xiv, 360 p. : ill.
ISBN
080782867X (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2004.
isbn
080782867X (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5166473
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jane E. Schultz is associate professor of English, American studies, and women's studies at Indiana University-Purdue University-Indianapolis.
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Schultz provides a complete history of female relief workers in the Civil War era--around 20,000 women of diverse regional, race, and class backgrounds who worked as nurses, cooks, and laundresses in Union and Confederate hospitals.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-02-01:
Schultz (English, American studies, and women's studies, Indiana Univ.-Purdue Univ.-Indianapolis.) seeks to analyze women's hospital work during the Civil War across region, race, and class lines. She breaks new ground, as previous analyses have studied women's hospital work by region, or have combined it with other themes such as patriotism, politics, memory, and literature. Schultz explores women's work during the war and subsequently examines the effect of war on individuals and the political and cultural legacies of women's work. The first part of the book is a carefully documented study of how region affected nurses' relations with each other, and how class or race affected those relations. She reveals the tension inherent in women assuming power over men rendered powerless by their wounds, a significant reversal of women's and men's societal roles. The war's effects on women are less well drawn, as the diversity of women's experiences is not explored in adequate detail to clearly delineate the war's legacies. Richly illustrated with 42 photographs and woodcuts, this is an excellent study of black and white women's nursing and relief contributions in the North and South. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. A. Luckett formerly, United States Military Academy
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[An] absorbing and meticulously researched history, and a useful introduction to Civil War histories written in the early postwar period." _ Metascience
"[An] absorbing and meticulously researched history, and a useful introduction to Civil War histories written in the early postwar period." -- Metascience
"[An] absorbing and meticulously researched history, and a useful introduction to Civil War histories written in the early postwar period." --Metascience
"[A] thorough, insightful, and carefully written history. . . . Engrossing and enlightening." _ American Historical Review
"[A] thorough, insightful, and carefully written history. . . . Engrossing and enlightening." -- American Historical Review
"[A] thorough, insightful, and carefully written history. . . . Engrossing and enlightening." --American Historical Review
"[Schultz] alone has assiduously mined a treasure trove of . . . information. . . . [This] superlative book is invaluable and should be read and considered by everyone interested in the Civil War." _ Historian
"[Schultz] alone has assiduously mined a treasure trove of . . . information. . . . [This] superlative book is invaluable and should be read and considered by everyone interested in the Civil War." -- Historian
"[Schultz] alone has assiduously mined a treasure trove of . . . information. . . . [This] superlative book is invaluable and should be read and considered by everyone interested in the Civil War." --Historian
"Schultz has enriched the historiography on women's war experiences in general and on the formative role of gender . . . in this particular war." _ Military History of the West
"Schultz has enriched the historiography on women's war experiences in general and on the formative role of gender . . . in this particular war." -- Military History of the West
"Schultz has enriched the historiography on women's war experiences in general and on the formative role of gender . . . in this particular war." --Military History of the West
"This absorbing book recovers a largely unknown history of the twenty thousand women who served Confederate and Union hospitals during the Civil War. . . . [A] compelling . . . account that is both empathic and unsentimental toward [the] subjects. The result is a nuanced and thoughtful interpretation of women at the front." _ Journal of Southern History
"This absorbing book recovers a largely unknown history of the twenty thousand women who served Confederate and Union hospitals during the Civil War. . . . [A] compelling . . . account that is both empathic and unsentimental toward [the] subjects. The result is a nuanced and thoughtful interpretation of women at the front." -- Journal of Southern History
"This absorbing book recovers a largely unknown history of the twenty thousand women who served Confederate and Union hospitals during the Civil War. . . . [A] compelling . . . account that is both empathic and unsentimental toward [the] subjects. The result is a nuanced and thoughtful interpretation of women at the front." --Journal of Southern History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2005
Doody's Reviews, August 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Jane Schulz offers a history of female relief workers, showing how domestic & military arenas merged during the Civil War.
Long Description
As many as 20,000 women worked in Union and Confederate hospitals during America's bloodiest war. Black and white, and from various social classes, these women served as nurses, administrators, matrons, seamstresses, cooks, laundresses, and custodial workers. Jane E. Schultz provides the first full history of these female relief workers, showing how the domestic and military arenas merged in Civil War America, blurring the line between homefront and battlefront.Schultz uses government records, private manuscripts, and published sources by and about women hospital workers, some of whom are familiar--such as Dorothea Dix, Clara Barton, Louisa May Alcott, and Sojourner Truth--but most of whom are not well-known. Examining the lives and legacies of these women, Schultz considers who they were, how they became involved in wartime hospital work, how they adjusted to it, and how they challenged it. She demonstrates that class, race, and gender roles linked female workers with soldiers, both black and white, but became sites of conflict between the women and doctors and even among themselves.Schultz also explores the women's postwar lives--their professional and domestic choices, their pursuit of pensions, and their memorials to the war in published narratives. Surprisingly few parlayed their war experience into postwar medical work, and their extremely varied postwar experiences, Schultz argues, defy any simple narrative of pre-professionalism, triumphalism, or conciliation.
Main Description
As many as 20,000 women worked in Union and Confederate hospitals during America's bloodiest war. Black and white, and from various social classes, these women served as nurses, administrators, matrons, seamstresses, cooks, laundresses, and custodial workers. Jane E. Schultz provides the first full history of these female relief workers, showing how the domestic and military arenas merged in Civil War America, blurring the line between homefront and battlefront. Schultz uses government records, private manuscripts, and published sources by and about women hospital workers, some of whom are familiar--such as Dorothea Dix, Clara Barton, Louisa May Alcott, and Sojourner Truth--but most of whom are not well-known. Examining the lives and legacies of these women, Schultz considers who they were, how they became involved in wartime hospital work, how they adjusted to it, and how they challenged it. She demonstrates that class, race, and gender roles linked female workers with soldiers, both black and white, but became sites of conflict between the women and doctors and even among themselves. Schultz also explores the women's postwar lives--their professional and domestic choices, their pursuit of pensions, and their memorials to the war in published narratives. Surprisingly few parlayed their war experience into postwar medical work, and their extremely varied postwar experiences, Schultz argues, defy any simple narrative of pre-professionalism, triumphalism, or conciliation.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
On Duty
Women at the Frontp. 11
Getting to the Hospitalp. 45
Adjusting to Hospital Lifep. 73
Coming into Their Ownp. 107
The Legacy of War Work
After the Warp. 145
Pensioning Womenp. 183
Memory and the Triumphal Narrativep. 211
A Note on Historiographyp. 247
Notesp. 253
Bibliographyp. 315
Indexp. 343
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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