Catalogue


Change in Eastern Europe /
Robert Weiner.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 1994.
description
viii, 183 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0275945391 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 1994.
isbn
0275945391 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
516631
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [167]-176) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œMany of his distinctions are well taken, notably that between East Central European areas ( he does not deal with the former USSR) once penetrated by the Ottomans and more northerly countries. This Praeger hardcover edition could be a handy supplement for students wishing to update the coverage of excellent analytic textbooks like Ivan Volgyes' politics in Eastern Europe(1986).'' Journal of Baltic Studies
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 1995
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Weiner provides a detailed examination of the history of the area; the causes of the Revolutions of 1989; and the key problems associated with the post-communist transition. In addition to a country-by-country analysis, Weiner looks at possible models of change and foreign policy in the region.
Long Description
The Revolutions of 1989 were a surprise to Kremlinologists because their models of change overestimated the staying power of ruling communist elites; at the same time civil society was able to form alternative political cultures which undermined the legitimacy of the socialist order. The Revolutions were the result of a prolonged systemic crisis of communism, combined with the unwillingness of Gorbachev to use force to maintain the Eastern European rulers in power. Civil society lost its fear of the repressive apparatus of the communist system as the ruling elites became increasingly disunited as to how to best respond to the crisis. After the Revolutions, other surprises were in store as the transition unfolded and the process of democratic consolidation encountered unanticipated obstacles. Weiner details these issues in one of the most up-to-date examinations of change in East Europe. After reviewing the history of the region and the imposition of communism, he analyzes the collapse of communism and the efforts to create stable alternatives country-by-country. In addition, he examines models of change and the foreign policies of the region. An indispensable guide to the area that will be of value to political scientists and others concerned with contemporary Eastern Europe.
Long Description
The Revolutions of 1989 were a "surprise" to Kremlinologists because their models of change overestimated the staying power of ruling communist elites; at the same time civil society was able to form alternative political cultures which undermined the legitimacy of the socialist order. The Revolutions were the result of a prolonged systemic crisis of communism, combined with the unwillingness of Gorbachev to use force to maintain the Eastern European rulers in power. Civil society lost its fear of the repressive apparatus of the communist system as the ruling elites became increasingly disunited as to how to best respond to the crisis. After the Revolutions, other "surprises" were in store as the transition unfolded and the process of democratic consolidation encountered unanticipated obstacles. Weiner details these issues in one of the most up-to-date examinations of change in East Europe. After reviewing the history of the region and the imposition of communism, he analyzes the collapse of communism and the efforts to create stable alternatives country-by-country. In addition, he examines models of change and the foreign policies of the region. An indispensable guide to the area that will be of value to political scientists and others concerned with contemporary Eastern Europe.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
The Rise and Fall of Communism
Introduction Take-Over, Stalinism, and De-Stalinization Poland, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia: 1956-1989 The Post-Communist Transition Poland Hungary
The Czech and Slovak Republics Bulgaria Romania The Former Yugoslavia Albania Foreign Policy
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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