Catalogue


Going critical : the first North Korean nuclear crisis /
Joel S. Wit, Daniel B. Poneman, Robert L. Gallucci.
imprint
Washington, D.C. : Brookings Institution Press, c2004.
description
xviii, 474 p., [6] leaves of plates. : ill.
ISBN
0815793863, 0815793863 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Washington, D.C. : Brookings Institution Press, c2004.
isbn
0815793863
0815793863 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
A cornered dog will sometimes bite -- An extremely peculiar nation, March-May 1993 -- No sitting president would allow North Korea to acquire nuclear weapons, June-August 1993 -- The twilight zone, September-December 1993 -- A sea of fire, January-March 1994 -- Ending history, April-May 1994 -- At the brink, June 3--June 14, 1994 -- We liked you starting from then, June 14-30, 1994 -- Sailing to an uncertain destination, July-August 1994 -- Progress usually comes at the eleventh hour, September-October 1994 -- What does not kill me makes me stronger, October 1994-July 1995 -- The land of counterpane.
catalogue key
5153952
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Joel S. Wit is a senior fellow with the Center for Strategic and International Studies. He served for fifteen years in the Department of State and was coordinator for the 1994 U.S.-North Korea Agreed Framework Daniel B. Poneman is a senior fellow with the Forum for International Policy and a principal in the Scowcroft Group. He served on the National Security Council staff under President George H. W. Bush and President Bill Clinton, including nearly four years as special assistant to the president for nonproliferation Robert L. Gallucci is dean of Georgetown University's Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service. A career civil servant in the Department of State, he led the team that negotiated the Agreed Framework and served as assistant secretary for political-military affairs and ambassador-at-large
Reviews
Review Quotes
"... a comprehensive insider's guide to the first North Korean nuclear standoff and an essential tool for comparing today's events to the last round...[The authors] argue convincingly that Washington cannot contract out its foreign policy on an interest as vital as assuring nuclear nonproliferation." --Scott Snyder, Asia Foundation, Foreign Affairs , 7/1/2004
"a 'how to' read for walking the minefield that constitutes relations and dealings with North Korea" --Chris Price, JoongAng Daily , 10/1/2005
"From cabinet meetings is Washington to Geneva talks and North Korean associations with China, GOING CRITICAL is a 'must' for any who would understand the latest issues and their ongoing implications for a nuclear crisis." -- The Bookwatch , 9/4/2004
"Going Critical is and should remain valuable reading for those interested not only in the North Korean crises of past and present, but in government decision-making, the practice of diplomacy, and non-proliferation more generally." --Sheena E. Chestnut, St. Antony's College, Oxford, Millennium , 11/1/2007
"Going Critical represents the collective reconstruction of events by three US officials intimately involved in negotiating with North Korea in 1994 leading to the dismantling of plutonium production facilities under international inspection....[It] is definitely the most factual account of the 'first North Korean Nuclear crisis' lent authority by the key negotiators from the American side." --Geoffrey C. Gunn, Faculty of Economics, Nagasaki University, Journal of Contemporary Asia
"GOING CRITICAL: THE FIRST NORTH KOREAN NUCLEAR CRISIS presents an authoritative account of the 1994 deal with North Korea.... The new book also provides a lively and engaging look into the inner workings of United States foreign policy making that is sure to captivate North Korea specialists and general readers alike." --Graham Allison, International Herald Tribune , 7/24/2004
"Reading Going Critical brought back the tensions and concerns of the earlier nuclear crisis of the 1990s. Of the three books under reivew, this is the most scholarly and the one most likely to have lasting value." --James Hoare, Times Higher Education Supplement , 9/24/2004
"Written with the rare benefit of special access to US government documents and incorporating the personal experiences of its three authors, all of whom played significant roles in the events of 1993-94, Going Critical recounts in detail the options that the Clinton administration considered at every stage of the story - and thus should prove invaluable to the Bush administration today." --Scott Snyder, Financial Review , 8/27/2004
"Far beyond simply providing prelude and understanding to current events, Wit, Poneman, and Gallucci have given us a fascinating, blow-by-blow account of the stark nuclear crisis of 1994. This is a valuable book." --Brent Scowcroft, former National Security Adviser
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
A decade before being proclaimed part of the "axis of evil," North Korea raised alarms in Washington, Seoul, and Tokyo as the pace of its clandestine nuclear weapons program mounted. When confronted by evidence of its deception in 1993, Pyongyang abruptly announced its intention to become the first nation ever to withdraw from the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, defying its earlier commitments to submit its nuclear activities to full international inspections.U.S. intelligence had revealed evidence of a robust plutonium production program. Unconstrained, North Korea's nuclear factory would soon be capable of building about thirty Nagasaki-sized nuclear weapons annually. The resulting arsenal would directly threaten the security of the United States and its allies, while tempting cash-starved North Korea to export its deadly wares to America's most bitter adversaries.In Go ing Critical, three former U.S. officials who played key roles in the nuclear crisis trace the intense efforts that led North Korea to freeze --and pledge ultimately to dismantle --its dangerous plutonium production program under international inspection, while the storm clouds of a second Korean War gathered. Drawing on international government documents, memoranda, cables, and notes, the authors chronicle the complex web of diplomacy--from Seoul, Tokyo, and Beijing to Geneva, Moscow, and Vienna and back again --that led to the negotiation of the 1994 Agreed Framework intended to resolve this nuclear standoff. They also explore the challenge of weaving together the military, economic, and diplomatic instruments employed to persuade North Korea to accept significant constraints on its nuclear activities, while deterring rather than provoking a violent North Korean response.Some ten years after these intense negotiations, the Agreed Framework lies abandoned. North Korea claims to possess some nuclear weapons, while threatening to produce even more. The story of the 1994 confrontation provides important lessons for the United States as it grapples once again with a nuclear crisis on a peninsula that half a century ago claimed more than 50,000 American lives and today bristles with arms along the last frontier of the cold war: the De-Militarized Zone separating North and South Korea.
Unpaid Annotation
A decade before being proclaimed part of the "axis of evil," North Korea raised alarms in Washington, Seoul, and Tokyo as the pace of its clandestine nuclear weapons program mounted. When confronted by evidence of its deception in 1993, Pyongyang abruptly announced its intention to become the first nation ever to withdraw from the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, defying its earlier commitments to submit its nuclear activities to full international inspections. U.S. intelligence had revealed evidence of a robust plutonium production program. Unconstrained, North Korea's nuclear factory would soon be capable of building about thirty Nagasaki-sized nuclear weapons annually. The resulting arsenal would directly threaten the security of the United States and its allies, while tempting cash-starved North Korea to export its deadly wares to America's most bitter adversaries. In Going Critical, three former U.S. officials who played key roles in the nuclear crisis trace the intense efforts that led North Korea to,freeze -- and pledge ultimately to dismantle -- its dangerous plutonium production program under international inspection, while the storm clouds of a second Korean War gathered. Drawing on international government documents, memoranda, cables, and notes, the authors chronicle the complex web of diplomacy--from Seoul, Tokyo, and Beijing to Geneva, Moscow, and Vienna and back again -- that led to the negotiation of the 1994 Agreed Framework intended to resolve this nuclear standoff. They also explore the challenge of weaving together the military, economic, and diplomatic instruments employed to persuade North Korea to accept significant constraints on its nuclear activities, whiledeterring rather than provoking a violent North Korean response. Some ten years after these intense negotiations, the Agreed Framework lies abandoned. North Korea claims to possess some nuclear weapons, while threatening to pr
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Introductionp. xiii
A Cornered Dog Will Sometimes Bitep. 1
An Extremely Peculiar Nation, March-May 1993p. 26
No Sitting President Would Allow North Korea to Acquire Nuclear Weapons, June-August 1993p. 51
The Twilight Zone, September-December 1993p. 78
A Sea of Fire, January-March 1994p. 118
Ending History, April-May 1994p. 162
At the Brink, June 3-June 14, 1994p. 192
We Liked You Starting from Then, June 15-30, 1994p. 221
Sailing to an Uncertain Destination, July-August 1994p. 247
Progress Usually Comes at the Eleventh Hour, September-October 1994p. 295
What Does Not Kill Me Makes Me Stronger, October 1994-July 1995p. 331
The Land of Counterpanep. 371
Appendixes
Chronologyp. 409
Joint Statements and Agreementsp. 419
Notesp. 429
Indexp. 463
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem