Catalogue

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Women, property, and the letters of the law in early modern England /
edited by Nancy E. Wright, Margaret W, Ferguson, A.R. Buck.
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2004.
description
x, 316 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0802087574 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2004.
isbn
0802087574 :
catalogue key
5153644
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2004
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Summaries
Description for Reader
Women, Property, and the Letters of the Law in Early Modern Englandexamines the competing narratives of property told by and about women in the early modern period. Through letters, legal treatises, case law, wills, and works of literature, the contributors explore women's complex roles as subjects and agents in commercial and domestic economies, and as objects shaped by a network of social and legal relationships. By constructing conversations across the disciplinary boundaries of legal and social history, sociology and literary criticism, the collection explores a diverse range of women's property relationships. Recent research has revealed fissures in our knowledge about women's property relationships within a regime characterized by competing jurisdictions, diverse systems of tenure, and multiple concepts of property. Women, Property, and the Letters of the Law in Early Modern Englandturns to these points of departure for the study of women's legal status and property relationships in the early modern period. This interdisciplinary analysis of women and property is written in an accessible manner and will become a valuable resource for scholars and students of Renaissance, Restoration and eighteenth-century literature, early modern social and legal history, and women's studies.
Description for Reader
Women, Property, and the Letters of the Law in Early Modern England examines the competing narratives of property told by and about women in the early modern period. Through letters, legal treatises, case law, wills, and works of literature, the contributors explore women's complex roles as subjects and agents in commercial and domestic economies, and as objects shaped by a network of social and legal relationships. By constructing conversations across the disciplinary boundaries of legal and social history, sociology and literary criticism, the collection explores a diverse range of women's property relationships.Recent research has revealed fissures in our knowledge about women's property relationships within a regime characterized by competing jurisdictions, diverse systems of tenure, and multiple concepts of property. Women, Property, and the Letters of the Law in Early Modern England turns to these points of departure for the study of women's legal status and property relationships in the early modern period. This interdisciplinary analysis of women and property is written in an accessible manner and will become a valuable resource for scholars and students of Renaissance, Restoration and eighteenth-century literature, early modern social and legal history, and women's studies.
Main Description
Women, Property, and the Letters of the Law in Early Modern England examines the competing narratives of property told by and about women in the early modern period. Through letters, legal treatises, case law, wills, and works of literature, the contributors explore women's complex roles as subjects and agents in commercial and domestic economies, and as objects shaped by a network of social and legal relationships. By constructing conversations across the disciplinary boundaries of legal and social history, sociology and literary criticism, the collection explores a diverse range of women's property relationships. Recent research has revealed fissures in our knowledge about women's property relationships within a regime characterized by competing jurisdictions, diverse systems of tenure, and multiple concepts of property. Women, Property, and the Letters of the Law in Early Modern England turns to these points of departure for the study of women's legal status and property relationships in the early modern period. This interdisciplinary analysis of women and property is written in an accessible manner and will become a valuable resource for scholars and students of Renaissance, Restoration and eighteenth-century literature, early modern social and legal history, and women's studies.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 3
Credit, Commerce, and Women's Property Relationships
Temporal Gestation, Legal Contracts, and the Promissory Economies of The Winter's Talep. 25
Putting Women in Their Place: Female Litigants at Whitehaven, 1660-1760p. 50
Women's Property, Popular Cultures, and the Consistory Court of London in the Eighteenth Centuryp. 66
The Whore's Estate: Sally Salisbury, Prostitution, and Property in Eighteenth-Century Londonp. 95
Women, Social Reproduction, and Patrilineal Inheritance
Primogeniture, Patrilineage, and the Displacement of Womenp. 121
Isabella's Rule: Singlewomen and the Properties of Poverty in Measure for Measurep. 137
Marriage, Identity, and the Pursuit of Property in Seventeenth-Century England: The Cases of Anne Clifford and Elizabeth Wisemanp. 162
Cordelia's Estate: Women and the Law of Property from Shakespeare to Nahum Tatep. 183
Women's Authorship and Ownership: Matrices for Emergent Ideas of Intellectual Property
Writing Home: Hannah Wolley, the Oxinden Letters, and Household Epistolary Practicep. 201
Women's Wills in Early Modern Englandp. 219
Spiritual Property: The English Benedictine Nuns of Cambrai and the Dispute over the Baker Manuscriptsp. 237
The Titular Claims of Female Surnames in Eighteenth-Century Fictionp. 256
Early Modern (Aristocratic) Women and Textual Propertyp. 281
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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