Catalogue


Gender, development and citizenship /
edited by Caroline Sweetman
imprint
Oxford : Oxfam, 2004.
description
101 p.
ISBN
0855985054
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
series title
imprint
Oxford : Oxfam, 2004.
isbn
0855985054
catalogue key
5153440
 
Includes biblographical references.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Millions of women throughout the world are denied their full human rights, and denied the opportunity to shape the future through participation in government bodies. The articles included in this volume address the issue of citizenship and civil rights from a gender perspective.
Main Description
Focusing on citizenship means thinking about the relationships between individuals and the stated in which they live. What difference does having citizenship rights mean for peoples lives? Are structures of governance efficient and responsive to peoples needs? This book examines ways in which citizenship is denies and argues that citizenship can be used to demand and advance human rights. Women often find themselves escluded from full citizenship by legal systems which leave men to look after the interests of their female dependents. But women need recognition as citizens in their own right, to protect them from exploitation and abuse. People from marginalised communities also often find that the state fails to respond to their needs and interests. Finally, migrants - a growing group of women and men in our global economy - live precariously as aliens in stated which do not acknowledge their claims to basic security and services. Topics here include the tension between cultural sensitivity and universal concepts of rights; reinterpretations of citizenship in communities where the state has failed to guarantee political or economic rights and projects which are helping to advance citizenship by increasing peoples vioce in decision making.
Main Description
Focusing on citizenship means thinking about the relationships between individuals and the states in which they live. What difference does having citizenship rights mean for people's lives? Are structures of governance efficient, and responsive to people's needs? This collection of articles examines ways in which citizenship is denied, and argues that citizenship can be used to demand and advance human rights. Women often find themselves excluded from full citizenship by legal systems which leave men to look after the interests of their female dependants. But women need recognition as citizens in their own right, to protect them from exploitation and abuse. People from marginalized communities also often find that the state fails to respond to their needs and interests. Finally, migrants a growing group of women and men in our global economy live precariously as aliens in states which do not acknowledge their claims to basic security and services. Topics here include the tension between cultural sensitivity and universal concepts of rights; reinterpretations of citizenship in communities where the state has failed to guarantee political or economic rights; and projects that are helping to advance active citizenship by increasing people's voice in decisionmaking.
Unpaid Annotation
Focusing on citizenship means thinking about the relationships between individuals and the states in which they live. What difference does having citizenship rights mean for people's lives? Are structures of governance efficient, and responsive to people's needs? This collection of articles examines ways in which citizenship is denied, and argues that citizenship can be used to demand and advance human rights. Women often find themselves excluded from full citizenship by legal systems which leave men to look after the interests of their female dependants. But women need recognition as citizens in their own right, to protect them from exploitation and abuse. People from marginalized communities also often find that the state fails to respond to their needs and interests. Finally, migrants a growing group of women and men in our global economy live precariously as aliens in states which do not acknowledge their claims to basic security and services. Topics here include the tension between cultural sensitivity,and universal concepts of rights; reinterpretations of citizenship in communities where the state has failed to guarantee political or economic rights; and projects which are helping to advance active citizenship by increasing people's voice in decision making.
Main Description
Focusing on citizenship means thinking about the relationships between individuals and the stated in which they live. What difference does having citizenship rights mean for people's lives? Are structures of governance efficient and responsive to people's needs? This book examines ways in which citizenship is denies and argues that citizenship can be used to demand and advance human rights. Women often find themselves excluded from full citizenship by legal systems which leave men to look after the interests of their female dependents. But women need recognition as citizens in their own right, to protect them from exploitation and abuse. People from marginalised communities also often find that the state fails to respond to their needs and interests. Finally, migrants - a growing group of women and men in our global economy - live precariously as aliens in stated which do not acknowledge their claims to basic security and services. Topics here include the tension between cultural sensitivity and universal concepts of rights; reinterpretations of citizenship in communities where the state has failed to guarantee political or economic rights and projects which are helping to advance citizenship by increasing people's voice in decision making.
Main Description
Focusing on citizenship means thinking about the relationships between individuals and the states in which they live. What difference does having citizenship rights mean for people "s lives? Are structures of governance efficient, and responsive to people "s needs? This collection of articles examines ways in which citizenship is denied, and argues that citizenship can be used to demand and advance human rights. Women often find themselves excluded from full citizenship by legal systems which leave men to look after the interests of their female dependants. But women need recognition as citizens in their own right, to protect them from exploitation and abuse. People from marginalized communities also often find that the state fails to respond to their needs and interests. Finally, migrants “ a growing group of women and men in our global economy “ live precariously as aliens in states which do not acknowledge their claims to basic security and services. Topics here include the tension between cultural sensitivity and universal concepts of rights; reinterpretations of citizenship in communities where the state has failed to guarantee political or economic rights; and projects that are helping to advance active citizenship by increasing people "s voice in decisionmaking.
Main Description
Focusing on citizenship means thinking about the relationships between individuals and the states in which they live. What difference does having citizenship rights mean for people's lives? Are structures of governance efficient, and responsive to people's needs? This collection of articles examines ways in which citizenship is denied, and argues that citizenship can be used to demand and advance human rights. Women often find themselves excluded from full citizenship by legal systems which leave men to look after the interests of their female dependants. But women need recognition as citizens in their own right, to protect them from exploitation and abuse. People from marginalized communities also often find that the state fails to respond to their needs and interests. Finally, migrants ' a growing group of women and men in our global economy ' live precariously as aliens in states which do not acknowledge their claims to basic security and services. Topics here include the tension between cultural sensitivity and universal concepts of rights; reinterpretations of citizenship in communities where the state has failed to guarantee political or economic rights; and projects that are helping to advance active citizenship by increasing people's voice in decisionmaking.
Main Description
Focusing on citizenship means thinking about the relationships between individuals and the states in which they live. What difference does having citizenship rights mean for people's lives? Are structures of governance efficient, and responsive to people's needs? This collection of articles examines ways in which citizenship is denied, and argues that citizenship can be used to demand and advance human rights. Women often find themselves excluded from full citizenship by legal systems which leave men to look after the interests of their female dependants. But women need recognition as citizens in their own right, to protect them from exploitation and abuse. People from marginalized communities also often find that the state fails to respond to their needs and interests. Finally, migrants - a growing group of women and men in our global economy - live precariously as aliens in states which do not acknowledge their claims to basic security and services. Topics here include the tension between cultural sensitivity and universal concepts of rights; reinterpretations of citizenship in communities where the state has failed to guarantee political or economic rights; and projects that are helping to advance active citizenship by increasing people's voice in decisionmaking.
Table of Contents
Editorialp. 2
Women in Ugandan local government: the impact of affirmative actionp. 8
Citizenship degraded: Indian women in a modern state and a pre-modern societyp. 19
Algerian women, citizenship, and the 'Family Code'p. 27
New forms of citizenship: democracy, family, and community in Rio de Janeiro, Brazilp. 36
Creating citizens who demand just governance: gender and development in the twenty-first centuryp. 45
Fragmented feminisms: women's organisations and citizenship in 'transition' in Polandp. 57
Gender, citizenship, and nationality in the Arab regionp. 66
Deprived of an individual identity: citizenship and women in Nepalp. 76
Women and citizenship in global teacher education: the Global-ITE Projectp. 83
Resourcesp. 93
Publicationsp. 93
Journalsp. 97
Training manuals and briefing papersp. 98
Electronic resourcesp. 98
Websitesp. 99
Organisationsp. 100
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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