Catalogue


Slovenia : from Yugoslavia to the European Union /
edited by Mojmir Mrak, Matja Rojec, Carlos Silva-Jauregui.
imprint
Washington, DC : World Bank, 2004.
description
446 p.
ISBN
0821357182
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Washington, DC : World Bank, 2004.
isbn
0821357182
catalogue key
5149721
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2005
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Summaries
Main Description
Slovenia's achievements over the past several years have been remarkable. Thirteen years after independence from the former Socialist Federative Republic of Yugoslavia, the country is among the most advanced of all the transition economies in Central and Eastern Europe and a leading candidate for accession to the European Union in May 2004. Remarkably, however, very little has been published documenting this historic transition.In the only book of its kind, the contributors - many of them the architects of Slovenia's current transformation - analyze the country's three-fold transition from a command to a market economy, from a regionally based to a national economy, and from a part of the Socialist Federative Republic of Yugoslavia to a member of the European Union (EU).With chapters from Slovenia's president, a former vice prime minister, the current and previous ministers of finance, the minister of European Affairs, the current and former governors of the Bank of Slovenia, as well as from leading development scholars in Slovenia and abroad, this unique collection synthesizes Slovenia's recent socioeconomic and political history and assesses the challenges ahead. Contributors discuss the Slovenian style of socioeconomic transformation, analyze Slovenia's quest for EU membership, and place Slovenia's transition within the context of the broader transition process taking place in Central and Eastern Europe.Of interest to development practitioners and to students and scholars of the region, Slovenia: From Yugoslavia to the European Union is a comprehensive and illuminating study of one country's path to political and economic independence.
Unpaid Annotation
In the only book of its kind, the contributors--many of them the architects of Slovenia's current transformations--analyze the country's three-fold transition from a command to a market economy, from a regionally based on a national economy, and from a part of the Socialist Federative Republic of Yugoslavia to a member of the European Union.
Unpaid Annotation
SloveniaA'-s achievements over the past several years have been remarkable. Thirteen years after independence from the former Socialist Federative Republic of Yugoslavia, the country is among the most advanced of all the transition economies in Central and Eastern Europe and a leading candidate for accession to the European Union in May 2004. Remarkably, however, very little has been published documenting this historic transition. In the only book of its kind, the contributors A-- many of them the architects of SloveniaA'-s current transformation A--analyze the countryA'-s three-fold transition from a command to a market economy, from a regionally based to a national economy, and from a part of the Socialist Federative Republic of Yugoslavia to a member of the European Union (EU). With chapters from SloveniaA'-s president, a former vice prime minister, the current and previous ministers of finance, the minister of European Affairs, the current and former governors of the Bank of Slovenia, as well as from leading development scholars in Slovenia and abroad, this unique collection synthesizes SloveniaA'-s recent socioeconomic and political history and assesses the challenges ahead. Contributors discuss the Slovenian style of socioeconomic transformation, analyze SloveniaA'-s quest for EU membership, and place SloveniaA'-s transition within the context of the broader transition process taking place in Central and Eastern Europe. Of interest to development practitioners and to students and scholars of the region, Slovenia: From Yugoslavia to the European Union is a comprehensive and illuminating study of one countryA'-s path to political and economic independence.
Main Description
Thirteen years after independence from the former Socialist Republic of Yugoslavia, Slovenia has become one of the most advanced transition economies in Central and Eastern Europe and will become a member of the EU in May 2004. This publication examines the country's recent political and socio-economic history, its transition to a market economy and the challenges that lie ahead. It includes contributions from Slovenia's president, a former vice prime minister, the current and previous ministers of finance, the minister of European Affairs, the current and former governors of the Bank of Slovenia, as well as from leading development scholars in Slovenia and abroad.
Long Description
Slovenia¿s achievements over the past several years have been remarkable. Thirteen years after independence from the former Socialist Federative Republic of Yugoslavia, the country is among the most advanced of all the transition economies in Central and Eastern Europe and a leading candidate for accession to the European Union in May 2004. Remarkably, however, very little has been published documenting this historic transition. In the only book of its kind, the contributors ¿ many of them the architects of Slovenia¿s current transformation ¿analyze the country¿s three-fold transition from a command to a market economy, from a regionally based to a national economy, and from a part of the Socialist Federative Republic of Yugoslavia to a member of the European Union (EU). With chapters from Slovenia¿s president, a former vice prime minister, the current and previous ministers of finance, the minister of European Affairs, the current and former governors of the Bank of Slovenia, as well as from leading development scholars in Slovenia and abroad, this unique collection synthesizes Slovenia¿s recent socioeconomic and political history and assesses the challenges ahead. Contributors discuss the Slovenian style of socioeconomic transformation, analyze Slovenia¿s quest for EU membership, and place Slovenia¿s transition within the context of the broader transition process taking place in Central and Eastern Europe. Of interest to development practitioners and to students and scholars of the region, Slovenia: From Yugoslavia to the European Union is a comprehensive and illuminating study of one country¿s path to political and economic independence.
Bowker Data Service Summary
An overview of the most important economic developments, achievements, problems and challenges faced by Slovenia during its more than a decade of transition to political and economic independence.
Long Description
SloveniaAcirc;'s achievements over the past several years have been remarkable. Thirteen years after independence from the former Socialist Federative Republic of Yugoslavia, the country is among the most advanced of all the transition economies in Central and Eastern Europe and a leading candidate for accession to the European Union in May 2004. Remarkably, however, very little has been published documenting this historic transition. In the only book of its kind, the contributors Acirc;- many of them the architects of SloveniaAcirc;'s current transformation Acirc;-analyze the countryAcirc;'s three-fold transition from a command to a market economy, from a regionally based to a national economy, and from a part of the Socialist Federative Republic of Yugoslavia to a member of the European Union (EU). With chapters from SloveniaAcirc;'s president, a former vice prime minister, the current and previous ministers of finance, the minister of European Affairs, the current and former governors of the Bank of Slovenia, as well as from leading development scholars in Slovenia and abroad, this unique collection synthesizes SloveniaAcirc;'s recent socioeconomic and political history and assesses the challenges ahead. Contributors discuss the Slovenian style of socioeconomic transformation, analyze SloveniaAcirc;'s quest for EU membership, and place SloveniaAcirc;'s transition within the context of the broader transition process taking place in Central and Eastern Europe. Of interest to development practitioners and to students and scholars of the region, Slovenia: From Yugoslavia to the European Union is a comprehensive and illuminating study of one countryAcirc;'s path to political and economic independence.
Long Description
SloveniaA's achievements over the past several years have been remarkable. Thirteen years after independence from the former Socialist Federative Republic of Yugoslavia, the country is among the most advanced of all the transition economies in Central and Eastern Europe and a leading candidate for accession to the European Union in May 2004. Remarkably, however, very little has been published documenting this historic transition. In the only book of its kind, the contributors A? many of them the architects of SloveniaA's current transformation A'analyze the countryA's three-fold transition from a command to a market economy, from a regionally based to a national economy, and from a part of the Socialist Federative Republic of Yugoslavia to a member of the European Union (EU). With chapters from SloveniaA's president, a former vice prime minister, the current and previous ministers of finance, the minister of European Affairs, the current and former governors of the Bank of Slovenia, as well as from leading development scholars in Slovenia and abroad, this unique collection synthesizes SloveniaA's recent socioeconomic and political history and assesses the challenges ahead. Contributors discuss the Slovenian style of socioeconomic transformation, analyze SloveniaA's quest for EU membership, and place SloveniaA's transition within the context of the broader transition process taking place in Central and Eastern Europe. Of interest to development practitioners and to students and scholars of the region, Slovenia: From Yugoslavia to the European Union is a comprehensive and illuminating study of one countryA's path to political and economic independence.
Table of Contents
Foreword
Preface and Acknowledgments
Acronyms and Abbreviations
Overview: Slovenia's Threefold Transition
The Political Reasons for the Dissolution of SFR Yugoslaviap. 3
Socialism and the Disintegration of SFR Yugoslaviap. 15
Independence and Integration into the International Community: A Window of Opportunityp. 32
Institutional Setting for the New Independent Statep. 53
Transition to a National and a Market Economy: A Gradualist Approachp. 67
Establishing Monetary Sovereigntyp. 83
Succession Issues in Allocating the External Debt of SFR Yugoslavia and Achieving Slovenia's Financial Independencep. 99
Macroeconomic Stabilization and Sustainable Growthp. 115
Trade Policy in the Transition Processp. 132
Monetary System and Monetary Policyp. 150
Exchange Rate Policy and Management of Capital Flowsp. 170
Fiscal Policy and Public Finance Reformsp. 189
Building an Institutional Framework for a Full-Fledged Market Economyp. 208
Privatization, Restructuring, and Corporate Governance of the Enterprise Sectorp. 224
Enterprise Restructuring in the First Decade of Independencep. 244
The Banking Sectorp. 263
Capital Market Developmentp. 276
Labor Market Developments in the 1990sp. 292
Social Sector Developmentsp. 315
Reentering the Markets of the Former Yugoslaviap. 334
EU Membership: Rationale, Costs, and Benefitsp. 353
Slovenia's Road to Membership in the European Unionp. 367
Size Matters in the European Union: Searching for Balance between Formal and Actual Equalityp. 381
Political Economy of Slovenia's Transitionp. 399
About the Editorsp. 413
Contributorsp. 417
Indexp. 421
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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