Catalogue


From Cuenca to Queens : an anthropological story of transnational migration /
Ann Miles.
imprint
Austin : University of Texas Press, 2004.
description
xiii, 229 p.
ISBN
0292702051 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Austin : University of Texas Press, 2004.
isbn
0292702051 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5146275
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Ann Miles is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Women's Studies at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2004-06-01:
"Until now I am like a river, going, going, but I don't know where I'm going to end up." In these simple words, Vicente Quitasaca summarizes his migration from the modest Ecuadorian city of Cuenca to New York-a journey more and more migrants from Latin America are taking to find economic prosperity and make a new life for themselves and the families remaining at home. Miles (anthropology & women's studies, Western Michigan Univ.) followed the Quitasaca family-mother, father, three sons, and three daughters-over a 15-year period marked by poverty, sadness, family stress, and the departure of eldest son, Vicente, in 1995. Miles offers much insight into the dynamics of life in Ecuador and Vicente's struggles as an illegal immigrant in one of the world's largest cities, first as a waiter and then in construction; like so many other Hispanics who come to America, he truly does not know where he is "going to end up." Recommended for academic libraries and larger public libraries.-Boyd Childress, Auburn Univ. Lib., AL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, June 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Discussions of transnational migration rarely spare time for the individual stories which can be told by real people. This volume does just that, following the journey of Vicente Quitasaca from Cuenca in Ecuador to New York City. Ann Miles assesses the impact on his life & on his family.
Main Description
Transnational migration is a controversial and much-discussed issue in both the popular media and the social sciences, but at its heart migration is about individual people making the difficult choice to leave their families and communities in hopes of achieving greater economic prosperity. Vicente Quitasaca is one of these people. In 1995 he left his home in the Ecuadorian city of Cuenca to live and work in New York City. This anthropological story of Vicente' migration and its effects on his life and the lives of his parents and siblings adds a crucial human dimension to statistics about immigration and the macro impact of transnational migration on the global economy. Anthropologist Ann Miles has known the Quitasacas since 1989. Her long acquaintance with the family allows her to delve deeply into the factors that eventually impelled the oldest son to make the difficult and dangerous journey to the United States as an undocumented migrant. Focusing on each family member in turn, Miles explores their varying perceptions of social inequality and racism in Ecuador and their reactions to Vicente' migration. As family members speak about Vicente' new, hard-to-imagine life in America, they reveal how transnational migration becomes a symbol of failure, hope, resignation, and promise for poor people in struggling economies. Miles frames this fascinating family biography with an analysis of the historical and structural conditions that encourage transnational migration, so that the Quitasacas' story becomes a vivid firsthand illustration of this growing global phenomenon.
Main Description
Transnational migration is a controversial and much-discussed issue in both the popular media and the social sciences, but at its heart migration is about individual people making the difficult choice to leave their families and communities in hopes of achieving greater economic prosperity. Vicente Quitasaca is one of these people. In 1995 he left his home in the Ecuadorian city of Cuenca to live and work in New York City. This anthropological story of Vicente's migration and its effects on his life and the lives of his parents and siblings adds a crucial human dimension to statistics about immigration and the macro impact of transnational migration on the global economy.Anthropologist Ann Miles has known the Quitasacas since 1989. Her long acquaintance with the family allows her to delve deeply into the factors that eventually impelled the oldest son to make the difficult and dangerous journey to the United States as an undocumented migrant. Focusing on each family member in turn, Miles explores their varying perceptions of social inequality and racism in Ecuador and their reactions to Vicente's migration. As family members speak about Vicente's new, hard-to-imagine life in America, they reveal how transnational migration becomes a symbol of failure, hope, resignation, and promise for poor people in struggling economies. Miles frames this fascinating family biography with an analysis of the historical and structural conditions that encourage transnational migration, so that the Quitasacas' story becomes a vivid firsthand illustration of this growing global phenomenon.
Short Annotation
Transnational migration is a controversial and much-discussed issue in both the popular media and the social sciences, but at its heart migration is about individual people making the difficult choice to leave their families and communities in hopes of achieving greater economic prosperity.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Time Line of Important Eventsp. xv
From Cuenca to Queens: Transnational Livesp. 1
Transnational Migration: Economies and Identitiesp. 11
Family Mattersp. 37
Rosap. 57
Luchop. 95
The Childrenp. 117
Vicentep. 149
Lives and Storiesp. 181
Notesp. 201
Referencesp. 209
Indexp. 223
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem