Catalogue

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Mexico and the United States : ambivalent vistas /
W. Dirk Raat.
edition
3rd ed.
imprint
Athens : University of Georgia Press, c2004.
description
xv, 296 p.
ISBN
0820325953 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Athens : University of Georgia Press, c2004.
isbn
0820325953 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5146263
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1992-12:
This welcome book on Mexico and the United States approaches their relationship eclectically. Instead of focusing on a major theme, the work presents a series of well-written essays that explore the cultural and economic influences of the United States on its southern neighbor with an emphasis on the historical periods prior to 1940. The author also gives some attention to Mexico's impact on the United States, primarily through the Mexican Revolution of 1910. Raat (Mexican history, SUNY), raises many interesting and significant questions about the two countries' relationship. For academic international affairs collections.-- Roderic A. Camp, Latin American Ctr., Tulane Univ., New Orleans, La. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1992-11-09:
This substantial, accessible history covers much ground: Mexico's relationship with the United States and the world economy, the United States' influence on Mexico's development, and the competing civilizations of Protestant North America and Native American-Hispanic Catholic Mexico. Raat ( Mexico: From Independence to Revolution ) begins with the evolution of competing ethnocentrisms (``gringos'' and ``greasers''), then explains how the early history of Mexico's native peoples has shaped the present. (``Mexico today is a land of superimposed pasts.'') Tracing the differences in ecology, climate and colonial economies, he probes the sources of overdevelopment in the United States and of underdevelopment in Mexico. He explains Mexico's own role in its loss of Texas and the divisive political impact of this loss on both the U.S. and Mexico. Raat asserts that like Franklin Roosevelt, Mexican modernizer Cardenas, who nationalized the oil industry, wanted to preserve capitalism. The most interesting chapter explores the ambivalent, hybrid border culture of Mexamerica. Illustrations. (Dec.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A fine study . . . Should become the standard work on United States-Mexican relations."-- Journal of American History
"A fine study . . . Should become the standard work on United States-Mexican relations."--Journal of American History
"A lively, balanced interpretation that students will enjoy and from which they will learn a great deal about Mexico."-- American Historical Review
"A lively, balanced interpretation that students will enjoy and from which they will learn a great deal about Mexico."--American Historical Review
"An intelligent, well-written overview . . . This book should attract a large reading audience."-- Hispanic American Historical Review
"An intelligent, well-written overview . . . This book should attract a large reading audience."--Hispanic American Historical Review
"An interesting work . . . There is a lot packed into this book."-- International History Review
"An interesting work . . . There is a lot packed into this book."--International History Review
"A profound work . . . of great utility for better understanding [Mexican] society and history."-- Iberoamericana
"A profound work . . . of great utility for better understanding [Mexican] society and history."--Iberoamericana
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2004
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
NAFTA, the collapse of the peso, the Zapatista rebellion in Chiapas, and heightened attention to illegal immigration and the drug trade are just some of the recent issues that are newly interpreted in this updated survey of U.S.-Mexican relations. Ranging from the precontact colonial eras of each country to the present-day administrations of Vicente Fox and George W. Bush, W. Dirk Raat's coverage focuses on the economic, cultural, and political trends and events that have regarded each other over the centuries. Raat pays special attention to the factors that have subordinated Mexico not only to "the Colossus of the North" but to many other players in the global market. He also offers a unique look at the cultural dynamics of Gran Chichimeca or Mexamerica, the borderlands where the two countries share a common history.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. xi
Prefacep. xiii
Acknowledgmentsp. xvii
"Gringos" and "Greasers"p. 1
Space/Time in the Tierra de la Mexicap. 12
Up and Down from Colonialismp. 38
Texas and a Collision of Culturesp. 55
From Pueblo to Global Villagep. 79
The Mexican Revolution in the United Statesp. 102
Soldiers, Priests, and Lords of Land and Industryp. 126
Preening and Ruffling the Serpent's Plumagep. 148
Mexamericap. 173
Epilogue: The Rediscovery of Mexicop. 196
Notesp. 217
Bibliographical Essayp. 267
Indexp. 279
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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