Catalogue


Devil's game : the Civil War intrigues of Charles A. Dunham /
Carman Cumming.
imprint
Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2004.
description
xiii, 305 p.
ISBN
0252028902 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2004.
isbn
0252028902 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Chameleon -- "Cheats and forgeries" -- Castle thunder -- Reptile journalist -- Southern life -- Fire in the rear -- A message from Richmond -- "Private business" -- School for perjury -- Plots "shrewd and devilish" -- Scorpions in a bottle -- Impeachment -- "Protean maneuvers" -- Letters from Albany.
catalogue key
5142591
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Carman Cumming worked as a reporter and editor in Canada and the United States before becoming a professor of journalism at Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario. Now semiretired, he is researching the Confederacy's Civil War operations in Canada
Reviews
Review Quotes
"During the Civil War, Charles A. Dunham successfully and profitably enacted the role of agent provocateur for both the Confederacy and the United States. His intricate hoaxes, eagerly accepted by credulous editors and officials, were important in establishing the fear of catastrophe that periodically infected both sides. So convincing were his lies and so anxious were his patrons to believe the worst of the enemy, that even after his exposure as an unscrupulous fraud he continued to be well-paid for his stories. Readers of this superlative book will likely come away with a new view of the Civil War."-- William Hanchett, author ofLincoln Murder Conspiracies
This item was reviewed in:
PW Annex Reviews, March 2004
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Summaries
Main Description
The first book-length study of one of the Civil War's most outlandish and mysterious characters, Devil's Game traces the amazing career of Charles A. Dunham, double agent. Dunham was a spy, forger, "reptile journalist," and master of dirty tricks. Writing under different names for different newspapers, including New York's Tribune, Herald, and World, he routinely faked stories to promote the North's war aims, sometimes writing contradictory stories for rival papers. Dunham also used his journalism to create new identities and sometimes stepped into them, playing (with the help of his wife, Ophelia) at least a half-dozen such roles.
Unpaid Annotation
A spy story about of the most notorious, scheming, and mysterious double agents of the civil war.
Main Description
The first book-length study of one of the Civil War's most outlandish and mysterious characters,Devil's Gametraces the amazing career of Charles A. Dunham, double agent.Dunham was a spy, forger, journalist, and master of dirty tricks. Writing for a variety of papers (including New York'sTribune,Herald, andWorld) under alternate names, he routinely faked stories, even writing contradictory accounts for different papers. Dunham also used his journalism to create new identities and then boldly cast himself to play the roles. With the help of his wife, Ophelia, he passed in and out of at least a half-dozen personae.His characters included the vicious "Colonel" Charles Dunham, under the command of General Early; Colonel James Watson Wallace, a wounded Virginian convalescing in Montreal; and Colonel George Margrave, "one of the most cool and reckless villains in the Confederacy." In the South, he was known as Isaac Haynes, with still more aliases for his Canadian travels. Dunham would reinforce his house of cards by going so far as to have the invented characters in his ersatz stories accuse each other of heinous crimes.Dunham achieved his greatest infamy at the war's end. Called to testify in Washington, he was the most notorious of the witnesses to swear that Lincoln's assassination had been plotted by conspirators in Montreal and Toronto, on orders from Richmond. These intrigues continued even from behind bars, as he worked tirelessly to build a network of evidence implicating President Andrew Johnson in the assassination.Although this testimony was later discredited, until now many parts of Dunham's wartime (and postwar) career have remained shadowy. Carman Cumming sheds new light on numerous escapades, including Dunham's effort to sell Lincoln on plans for a raid to capture Jefferson Davis and a complex effort in Canada to plan--and then betray--cross-border raids. Exhaustively researched and unprecedented in its depth,Devil's Gameis a shocking portrait of a consummate chameleon. Drawing together all previous Dunham scholarship, Cumming offers the first detailed tour of Dunham's convoluted, high-stakes, international deceits. A carefully crafted assessment of Dunham's motives, personality, and the complex effects of his schemes make Devil's Game an important and original work that will change some basic assumptions about the secret operations of the Civil War.
Main Description
The first book-length study of one of the Civil War's most outlandish and mysterious characters, Devil's Game traces the amazing career of Charles A. Dunham, double agent.Dunham was a spy, forger, journalist, and master of dirty tricks. Writing for a variety of papers (including New York's Tribune, Herald, and World) under alternate names, he routinely faked stories, even writing contradictory accounts for different papers. Dunham also used his journalism to create new identities and then boldly cast himself to play the roles. With the help of his wife, Ophelia, he passed in and out of at least a half-dozen personae.His characters included the vicious "Colonel" Charles Dunham, under the command of General Early; Colonel James Watson Wallace, a wounded Virginian convalescing in Montreal; and Colonel George Margrave, "one of the most cool and reckless villains in the Confederacy." In the South, he was known as Isaac Haynes, with still more aliases for his Canadian travels. Dunham would reinforce his house of cards by going so far as to have the invented characters in his ersatz stories accuse each other of heinous crimes.Dunham achieved his greatest infamy at the war's end. Called to testify in Washington, he was the most notorious of the witnesses to swear that Lincoln's assassination had been plotted by conspirators in Montreal and Toronto, on orders from Richmond. These intrigues continued even from behind bars, as he worked tirelessly to build a network of evidence implicating President Andrew Johnson in the assassination.Although this testimony was later discredited, until now many parts of Dunham's wartime (and postwar) career have remained shadowy. Carman Cumming sheds new light on numerous escapades, including Dunham's effort to sell Lincoln on plans for a raid to capture Jefferson Davis and a complex effort in Canada to plan--and then betray--cross-border raids. Exhaustively researched and unprecedented in its depth, Devil's Game is a shocking portrait of a consummate chameleon. Drawing together all previous Dunham scholarship, Cumming offers the first detailed tour of Dunham's convoluted, high-stakes, international deceits. A carefully crafted assessment of Dunham's motives, personality, and the complex effects of his schemes make Devil's Game an important and original work that will change some basic assumptions about the secret operations of the Civil War.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Chameleonp. 1
"Cheats and Forgeries"p. 20
Castle Thunderp. 35
Reptile Journalistp. 56
Southern Lifep. 81
Fire in the Rearp. 95
A Message from Richmondp. 123
"Private Business"p. 145
School for Perjuryp. 160
Plots "Shrewd and Devilish"p. 181
Scorpions in a Bottlep. 199
Impeachmentp. 213
"Protean Maneuvers"p. 238
Letters from Albanyp. 247
Notesp. 263
Bibliographyp. 291
Indexp. 297
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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