Catalogue


The heart of Mid-Lothian /
Walter Scott ; edited by David Hewitt and Alison Lumsden.
imprint
Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, 2004.
description
xvi, 770 p. : maps.
ISBN
0748605703
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, 2004.
isbn
0748605703
catalogue key
5135427
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-12-01:
From the outset, readers of this volume will know themselves to be in the hands of learned and accomplished editors. By comparing the first edition of Scott's famous work to the manuscript, the editors of this excellent edition produce "an ideal first edition." The essay on the text and the detailed explanatory notes provide ample information. Only scholars will be interested in the detailed history of all the editions of the novel, but all serious readers will find the discussion of Scott's creative method fascinating, especially the case Hewitt and Lumsden make for him as a far more careful writer than scholars have heretofore believed. They also do a fine job of showing how Scott used and reshaped historical material into fiction. The extensive glosses translate all the Latin tags and provide cogent explanations of the Scot's dialect, proverbial material, ballads, history, legal system, and language. Some may wonder if this edition suffers from the lack of dense prefatory material, one of the striking features of the Magnum Opus edition, but since that is readily available, the present volume offers the modern reader a version very close to that a reader in 1818 would have experienced. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. S. F. Klepetar St. Cloud State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
A part of our immediate response to these exemplary volumes is to feel the discrepancy between Scott's slapdash, hearty, headlong method of composition and the painstaking toil of his editors…the Edinburgh editors have reverted to the first editions, but have also combed the manuscripts for missed readings and lost material; some of the latter, such as the portraits of Edinburgh literati in Guy Mannering , are substantial discoveries.
By comparing the first edition of Scott's famous work to the manuscript, the editors of this excellent edition produce 'an ideal first edition.'
"By comparing the first edition of Scott's famous work to the manuscript, the editors of this excellent edition produce 'an ideal first edition.'" -- Choice
From the outset, readers of this volume will know themselves to be in the hands of learned and accomplished editors. By comparing the first edition of Scott's famous work to the manuscript, the editors of this excellent edition produce 'an ideal first edition'… all serious readers wil find the discussion of Scott's creative method fascinating, especially the case Hewitt and Lumsden make for him as a far more careful writer than scholars have heretofore believed… The present volume offers the modern reader a version very close to that a reader in 1818 would have experienced ... Highly recommended.
I recommend the book to admirers of Scott and to those who, like me, have never read his work but always felt they should.
"I recommend the book to admirers of Scott and to those who, like me, have never read his work but always felt they should." -- Sue Asher, The Historical Novels Review
The Edinburgh Edition… aims to rescue these superb works of fiction from an unfortunate history of errors...…A huge project, very scholarly, and altogether very grand indeed… it is perhaps Scott's most profound novel, being a considered meditation on the nature of justice… the novel is, above all, a superb story with a cast of rich characters.
"The present volume offers the modern reader a version very close to that a reader in 1818 would have experienced...Highly recommended."
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2004
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The Heart of Midlothian presents the story of Jeanie Deans, a dairymaid who journeys to London to big for a reprieve for her sister. Set in the 1730s, the novel dramatises different kinds of justice, including lynching by an Edinburgh mob.
Description for Reader
Find Out What Scott Really Wrote Going back to the original manuscripts, a team of scholars has uncovered what Scott originally wrote and intended his public to read before errors, misreadings and expurgations crept in during production. The Edinburgh Edition offers you: A clean, corrected text Textual histories Explanatory notes Verbal changes from the first-edition text Full glossaries Title Description The Heart of Mid-Lothian is precisely focused on the trials for murder of John Porteous and of Effie Deans in 1736 and 1737. Yet it is a chronicle Scott's only chronicle which spans the eighty years of the life of David Deans, whose death takes place in 1751. The most complex of all Scott's narratives, it is also the most challenging in that it raises in an acute fashion the problem of a judicial system that does not produce justice. Scott places this fundamental issue in its immediate political context, in history as represented by the life of Deans, and alongside the justice of Providence as perceived by his daughter Jeanie, the greatest of Scott's heroines. The Edinburgh Edition of The Heart of Mid-Lothian provides a new text, and in its annotation treats comprehensively the novel's historical, legal, religious and cultural sources.
Main Description
Find Out What Scott Really WroteGoing back to the original manuscripts, a team of scholars has uncovered what Scott originally wrote and intended his public to read before errors, misreadings and expurgations crept in during production. The Heart of Mid-Lothian is precisely focused on the trials for murder of John Porteous and of Effie Deans in 1736 and 1737. Yet it is a chronicle - Scott's only chronicle - which spans the eighty years of the life of David Deans, whose death takes place in 1751. The most complex of all Scott's narratives, it is also the most challenging in that it raises in an acute fashion the problem of a judicial system that does not produce justice. Scott places this fundamental issue in its immediate political context, in history as represented by the life of Deans, and alongside the justice of Providence as perceived by his daughter Jeanie, the greatest of Scott's heroines.The Edinburgh Edition of The Heart of Mid-Lothian provides a new text, and in its annotation treats compr
Main Description
The Heart of Mid-Lothianis precisely focused on the murder trials of John Porteous and Effie Deans in 1736 and 1737. Scott's chronicle spans the eighty years of David Dean's life. A complex and challenging narrative that acutely raises the problem of a judicial system that does not produce justice. Placed within its immediate political context, history is represented through the life of the Deans, accompanied by the justice of Providence as perceived by his daughter Jeanie, the greatest of Scott's heroines. This edition of The Heart of Mid-Lothianprovides a new text established in accordance with the tired policies and practices of the Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels. Its annotation comprehensively treats the novel's historical, legal, religious and cultural sources.
Main Description
The Heart of Mid-Lothian is precisely focused on the murder trials of John Porteous and Effie Deans in 1736 and 1737. Scott's chronicle spans the eighty years of David Dean's life. A complex and challenging narrative that acutely raises the problem of a judicial system that does not produce justice. Placed within its immediate political context, history is represented through the life of the Deans, accompanied by the justice of Providence as perceived by his daughter Jeanie, the greatest of Scott's heroines. This edition of The Heart of Mid-Lothian provides a new text established in accordance with the tired policies and practices of the Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels. Its annotation comprehensively treats the novel's historical, legal, religious and cultural sources.
Main Description
The Heart of Mid-Lothianis precisely focused on the murder trials of John Porteous and Effie Deans in 1736 and 1737. Scott's chronicle spans the eighty years of David Dean's life. A complex and challenging narrative that acutely raises the problem of a judicial system that does not produce justice. Placed within its immediate political context, history is represented through the life of the Deans, accompanied by the justice of Providence as perceived by his daughter Jeanie, the greatest of Scott's heroines.This edition of The Heart of Mid-Lothianprovides a new text established in accordance with the tired policies and practices of the Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels. Its annotation comprehensively treats the novel's historical, legal, religious and cultural sources.
Main Description
The Heart of Mid-Lothian is precisely focused on the trials for murder of John Porteous and of Effie Deans in 1736 and 1737. Yet it is a chronicle-Scott's only chronicle-which spans the eighty years of the life of David Deans, whose death takes place in 1751. It is the most complex of all Scott's narratives. It is also the most challenging in that it raises in an acute fashion the problem of a judicial system that does not produce justice. Scott places this fundamental issue in its immediate political context, in history as represented by the life of Deans, and alongside the justice of Providence as perceived by his daughter Jeanie, the greatest of Scott's heroines.This edition of The Heart of Mid-Lothian provides a new text established in accordance with the tried policies and practices of the Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels, and in its annotation treats comprehensively the novel's historical, legal, religious and cultural sources.
Main Description
The Heart of Mid-Lothian is precisely focused on the trials for murder of John Porteous and of Effie Deans in 1736 and 1737. Yet it is Scott's only chronicle, spanning the eighty years of the life of David Deans, whose death takes place in 1751. It is the most complex of all Scott's narratives. It is also the most challenging in that it raises in an acute fashion the problem of a judicial system that does not produce justice, and places it within not just the immediate political context, but within history as represented by the life of Deans, and the justice of Providence as perceived by his daughter Jeanie, the greatest of Scott's heroines.

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