Catalogue


Bush league diplomacy : how the Neoconservatives are putting the world at risk /
Craig R. Eisendrath and Melvin A. Goodman.
imprint
Amherst, N.Y. : Prometheus Books, 2004.
description
268 p.
ISBN
1591021766 (hardcover)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Amherst, N.Y. : Prometheus Books, 2004.
isbn
1591021766 (hardcover)
catalogue key
5133706
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Melvin A. Goodman is a senior fellow at the Center for International Policy; a professor of international security at the National War College; an adjunct professor at Johns Hopkins University.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2004-01-05:
A former CIA official (Goodman) and ex-diplomat (Eisendrath) team up to examine how, in their opinion, the Bush administration has rolled back over half a century of foreign policy accomplishments. Current policy relies on bullying with military force, they argue, as it rejects the broad collaborative approach in effect from the founding of the U.N. to the first President Bush's coalition against Saddam Hussein in the Gulf War. Although Eisendrath and Goodman see some potential for change in recent administrative appointments, they emphatically urge that more direct action toward multilateralism must be taken to restore America's reputation abroad and counter the centralization of power in the presidency to prevent deterioration of the domestic situation. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Choice on 2004-12-01:
This polemic from the left-wing Center for International Policy makes many valid points, but it is not a good book. In a purported comprehensive critique of Bush foreign policy, the authors condemn what they consider an abandonment of diplomacy for military force, contempt for international law and the international community, subversion of the American intelligence community, reckless behavior, disdain for Congress, and subversion of civil liberties. They conclude that the administration's neoconservative coterie has endangered American security around the globe. Although judicious scholars make many of the same judgments, this book reads more like overheated political campaign rhetoric than careful analysis. It is devoid of nuance, balance, or fairness. Not only will the treatise not withstand the test of time, but it probably won't outlast the presidential campaign. For less hyperbolic challenges to Bush diplomatic action, see Richard A. Clarke's Against All Enemies, Jeffrey Record's Dark Victory (CH, Dec'04), Phillip H. Gordon and Jeremy Shapiro's Allies at War (CH, Dec'04), or Ivo H. Daalder and James M. Lindsey's America Unbound: The Bush Revolution in Foreign Policy (CH, Jun'04). Eisendrath and Goodman are decidedly more "Bush League" than professional. ^BSumming Up: Optional. General readers. J. P. Dunn Converse College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, January 2004
Globe & Mail, May 2004
Choice, December 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
In this comprehensive critique of the Bush administration's handling of international relations, two senior fellows at the Center for International Policy demonstrate the folly and the dangers of abandoning diplomacy and relying on military force as the chief means of conducting U.S. foreign policy.
Unpaid Annotation
A comprehensive critique of the Bush administration's handling of international relations.
Main Description
In this comprehensive critique of the George W. Bush administration's handling of international relations, Craig R. Eisendrath and Melvin A. Goodman, both senior fellows at the Center for International Policy, demonstrate the folly and the dangers of abandoning diplomacy and relying on military force as the chief means of conducting U.S. foreign policy
Main Description
Fifty years ago, the United States founded the United Nations, promoted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, used economic aid as a tool for creating stability, and viewed collective agreements and cooperation as the principal methods of sharing the costs and the risks of security. Today, under the leadership of George W. Bush, the main tool of foreign policy is military force, not diplomacy. America is going it alone, and paying the price, both abroad and at home, for the reckless endangerment of both national and international security. In this comprehensive critique of the Bush administration's handling of international relations, Craig R. Eisendrath and Melvin A. Goodman, both senior fellows at the Center for International Policy, demonstrate the folly and the dangers of abandoning diplomacy and relying on military force as the chief means of conducting U.S. foreign policy. The authors argue that a policy of bullying will sow seeds of resentment and mistrust among our potential allies and encourage nations hostile to our interests to seek nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction as a last-resort method of protecting themselves against a belligerent world power. Eisendrath and Goodman foresee the international community becoming dangerously unstable, not more secure, under a Pax Americana maintained by military might. On the domestic front, the authors warn that a policy emphasizing the power of the executive branch at the expense of Congress, and suspending long-standing civil rights under the pretext of national security, threatens the Constitution. Finally, the decline of government services for education, health, and the elderly, and the economic effect of huge military expenditures financed by deficit spending are already causing distress in large parts of our society. This trenchant critique by two experienced foreign policy analysts will serve as a wake-up call to the dangerous militarism at the heart of the Bush agenda.
Main Description
Fifty years ago, the United States founded the United Nations, promoted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, used economic aid as a tool for creating stability, and viewed collective agreements and cooperation as the principal methods of sharing the costs and the risks of security. Today, under the leadership of George W. Bush, the main tool of foreign policy is military force, not diplomacy. America is going it alone, and paying the price, both abroad and at home, for the reckless endangerment of both national and international security.In this comprehensive critique of the Bush administrations handling of international relations, Craig R. Eisendrath and Melvin A. Goodman, both senior fellows at the Center for International Policy, demonstrate the folly and the dangers of abandoning diplomacy and relying on military force as the chief means of conducting U.S. foreign policy. The authors argue that a policy of bullying will sow seeds of resentment and mistrust among our potential allies and encourage nations hostile to our interests to seek nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction as a last-resort method of protecting themselves against a belligerent world power. Eisendrath and Goodman foresee the international community becoming dangerously unstable, not more secure, under a Pax Americana maintained by military might.On the domestic front, the authors warn that a policy emphasizing the power of the executive branch at the expense of Congress, and suspending long-standing civil rights under the pretext of national security, threatens the Constitution. Finally, the decline of government services for education, health, and the elderly, and the economic effect of huge military expenditures financed by deficit spending are already causing distress in large parts of our society.This trenchant critique by two experienced foreign policy analysts will serve as a wake-up call to the dangerous militarism at the heart of the Bush agenda.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. 11
Path of Failure
Fall from Grace: America Abandons Collective Securityp. 15
The United Nationsp. 27
Economic Aidp. 29
International Lawp. 30
Use of Force versus Arms Controlp. 31
Diplomacyp. 31
The Intelligence Systemp. 32
Military Spending and the Militarization of Foreign Policyp. 32
Democracy at Homep. 33
Terrorism and Peacekeeping: The Afghanistan Precedentp. 37
The 9/11 Attacksp. 37
The U.S. Responsep. 38
Reconstructing Afghanistanp. 41
The Problem of Nation-Buildingp. 46
Dangers of Interventionp. 48
The War against Terrorismp. 49
A Different Model: East Timorp. 51
Geopolitical Costs and Risks of the Iraqi Warp. 57
International Opposition to the U.S. War against Iraqp. 65
Geopolitical Consequences for Transnational Issuesp. 68
The Iraqi Legacyp. 70
International Dangers for American Securityp. 77
Dangers of the Back Burnerp. 78
A Major Breakthrough in Libyap. 88
The Middle East Peace Process and the "Road Map"p. 89
The Geoeconomic Dimensionp. 94
The Failures of Intelligencep. 99
9/11 and the Failure of Intelligencep. 100
Failures of Intelligencep. 104
Structural Flawsp. 108
Misuse of Covert Actionp. 110
The Misuse of Intelligence to Go to Warp. 111
What Is to Be Done?p. 114
The Need for Glasnostp. 117
Foundations of Failure
Militarizing American Security Policyp. 125
The Lesson of the USS Colep. 128
Militarization of Foreign Policyp. 129
Clinton Administration: Defeat of the CTBT and the International Criminal Courtp. 130
Making the World More Perilousp. 132
Global Dominionp. 137
Iraq: Test Case for the New Strategyp. 139
Assassinationp. 140
Raising the Defense Budgetp. 141
Is Military Power Enough?p. 142
The Dangers of Militarizationp. 143
The End of Arms Control and Disarmamentp. 147
The End of Arms Control and Disarmament: Placing America at Riskp. 152
Fallacy of the Bush Administration's Strategic Thinkingp. 160
What Needs to Be Done?p. 161
Going It Alone: Bush Charts His Own Coursep. 169
Who Needs the Rest of the World?p. 169
Collective Securityp. 172
Drifting into Unilateralismp. 173
Policy Driven by Ideologyp. 174
The Neoconsp. 177
The War at Homep. 195
Military Tribunalsp. 196
Detaineesp. 198
USA PATRIOT Actp. 201
PATRIOT Act IIp. 205
Domestic Military Commandp. 207
Homeland Security Departmentp. 208
Rolling Back the Twentieth Centuryp. 210
"It's the Economy, Stupid"p. 212
From the Wrong to the Right Path
Where in the World Is Bush Taking Us?p. 219
Paradigm Lostp. 220
Worst-Case Scenariosp. 221
An Apocalyptic Visionp. 233
Road Map to the Future: What Is to Be Done?p. 237
Foreign Policyp. 239
Domestic Policyp. 245
What Is to Be Done?p. 247
Pursuing the Phantom of a National Missile Defensep. 251
A Short History of "Star Wars"p. 251
The Threatp. 253
The System Doesn't Work!p. 254
Suing the Presidentp. 257
Strategic Danger of the National Missile Defensep. 258
Indexp. 263
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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