Catalogue


Cultural non-conformity in early modern Florence /
Domenico Zanrè.
imprint
Aldershot : Ashgate, c2004.
description
xiii, 190 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0754630072
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Aldershot : Ashgate, c2004.
isbn
0754630072
catalogue key
5133194
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Domenico Zanre is a Lecturer in Italian at the University of Glasgow.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2004
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Summaries
Main Description
The individuals who form the focus of this study were relatively minor, yet fascinating, figures who operated on the cultural margins of sixteenth-century Florence during the rule of Cosimo I de' Medici. All of them were associated with, if not actually members of, the Florentine Academy. They include the courtesan and poetess Tullia d'Aragona; the scurrilous and controversial dramatist Antonfrancesco Grazzini; the hitherto unknown academician and satirist Alfonso de' Pazzi, and the equally unfamiliar hunchback poet Girolamo Amelonghi.In this volume, Domenico Zanre examines the ways in which these historical figures attempted to produce alternative literary responses within a dominant officially-sanctioned and closely-controlled environment which sought to contain and/or exclude them.Combining painstaking archival research with recent theoretical work on marginality and masculinity, this book represents an original and important contribution to the study of early modern cultural history, literature, and politics.
Long Description
The individuals who form the focus of this study were relatively minor, yet fascinating, figures who operated on the cultural margins of sixteenth-century Florence during the rule of Cosimo I de' Medici. They include the courtesan and poetess Tullia d'Aragona; the scurrilous and controversial dramatist Antonfrancesco Grazzini; the hitherto unknown academician and satirist Alfonso de' Pazzi, and the equally unfamiliar hunchback poet Girolamo Amelonghi.All of these individuals were associated with, if not actually members of, the Medici-sponsored Florentine Academy in the 1540s and 50s, a period of pronounced social and cultural transition arising from the changed political circumstances of the city under the government of Duke Cosimo I. In this volume, Domenico Zanre examines the ways in which Grazzini, Amelonghi, Pazzi, and d'Aragona attempted to produce 'alternative' literary responses within a dominant officially-sanctioned and closely-controlled environment which sought to contain and/or exclude them.Combining painstaking archival research with recent theoretical work on marginality and masculinity, this book represents an original and important contribution to the study of early modern cultural history, literature, and politics.
Unpaid Annotation
The individuals who form the focus of this study were minor, yet fascinating, figures who operated on the cultural margins of sixteenth-century Florence during the rule of Cosimo I de' Medici. All of them were associated with, if not actually members of, the Florentine Academy. They include the courtesan and poetess Tullia d'Aragona; the scurrilous and controversial dramatist Antonfrancesco Grazzini; the unknown academician and satirist Alfonso de' Pazzi, and the equally unfamiliar hunchback poet Girolamo Amelonghi. Combining painstaking archival research with recent theoretical work on marginality and masculinity, this book represents an original and important contribution to the study of early modern cultural history, literature, and politics.
Unpaid Annotation
The individuals who form the focus of this study were relatively minor, yet fascinating, figures who operated on the cultural margins of sixteenth-century Florence during the rule of Cosimo I de' Medici. All of them were associated with, if not actually members of, the Florentine Academy. They include the courtesan and poetess Tullia d'Aragona; the scurrilous and controversial dramatist Antonfrancesco Grazzini; the hitherto unknown academician and satirist Alfonso de' Pazzi, and the equally unfamiliar hunchback poet Girolamo Amelonghi.
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this study of cultural non-conformity in 16th century Florence the author examines how certain individuals could produce alternative literary responses within a dominant, officially-sanctioned cultural milieu that attempted to contain or exclude them.
Unpaid Annotation
The individuals who form the focus of this study were relatively minor, yet fascinating figures who operated on the cultural margins of sixteenth-century Florence during the rule of Cosimo I de' Medici. All of them were associated with, if not actually members of, the Florentine Academy. They include the courtesan and poetess Tullia d'Aragona, the scurrilous and controversial dramatist Antonfrancesco Grazzini, the hitherto unknown academician and satirist Alfonso de' Pazzi and the hunchback poet Girolamo Amelonghi. Combining painstaking archival research with recent theoretical work on marginality and masculinity, this book represents an original, important contribution to the study of early modern cultural history, literature, and politics.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. vii
List of Abbreviationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
The Creation of an Official Cultural Centre
Political, Social, and Cultural Diversity in Mid-Cinquecento Florencep. 7
Dissent and Control in the Academyp. 33
Cultural Non-Conformity on the Margins
Antonfrancesco Grazzini: Dissent, Expulsion, and Reintegrationp. 59
Gods, Giants, and Hunchbacks: Girolamo Amelonghi and La Giganteap. 87
Sonnets and Satire in the Academy: The Poetry of Alfonso de' Pazzip. 111
Courtesans and the Academiciansp. 141
Conclusionp. 165
Appendixp. 169
Bibliographyp. 173
Indexp. 187
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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