Catalogue

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Food security in the Russian Federation /
David Sedik, Sergey Sotnikov, and Doris Wiesmann.
imprint
Rome : Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, 2003.
description
xv, 114 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
ISBN
9251050414
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Rome : Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, 2003.
isbn
9251050414
general note
"TC/M/Y5069E/1/12.03/900"--P. [4] of cover.
abstract
This report addresses both the situation of food security in the Russian Federation and the outlook for removing constraints on food security in the future. The country does not appear to be food-insecure by measures of food availability. The most significant change in food availability since 1992 has been a change in the mix of foods, away from products of animal origin towards those of vegetable origin. Survey information on food consumption indicates that food inadequacy seems to be more severe the more urban the settlement. The greater food security of rural areas is connected with the prevalence of private plots and their role as a buffer against poverty. Also, food inadequacy is higher in larger families, though not necessarily in families with large numbers of children. Finally, contrary to popular concern, pensioner families do not seem to be at higher risk of food inadequacy compared to other families.
catalogue key
5131810
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 103-108).
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
This report addresses both the situation of food security in the Russian Federation and the outlook for removing constraints on food security in the future. It argues that, despite great concern, the country does not appear to be food insecure by measures of food availability. The most significant change in food availability since 1992 has been a change in the mix of foods, away from products of animal origin towards those of vegetable origin. Survey information on food consumption indicates that food inadequacy seems to be more severe the more urban the settlement. The greater food security of rural areas is connected with the prevalence of private plots and their role as a buffer against poverty. Also, food inadequacy is higher in larger families, though not necessarily in families with large numbers of children. Finally, contrary to popular concern, pensioner families do not seem to be at higher risk of food inadequacy compared to other families.

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