Catalogue


America as empire : global leader or rogue power? /
Jim Garrison.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
San Francisco : Berret-Koehler Publishers, c2004.
description
xii, 224 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
157675281X (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
San Francisco : Berret-Koehler Publishers, c2004.
isbn
157675281X (acid-free paper)
catalogue key
5129135
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 203-206) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jim Garrison is president of the State of the World Forum
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2004-01-05:
Garrison, president of the State of the World Forum, reviews America's rise to the de facto status of an "imperial republic" and suggests that the country can "articulate a vision of greatness" that will lead the rest of the world into liberal democracy. Garrison is undoubtedly correct that no other nation is powerful enough to lead the charge, and his historical analysis is strong despite its brevity. Yet the author's emphasis on the positive prospects for "the first planetary civilization" will strike many as overly optimistic. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Choice on 2004-07-01:
Garrison is the president of the State of the World Forum, a San Francisco-based organization, the outgrowth of Mikhail Gorbachev's Gorbachev Foundation/USA, which espouses liberal internationalism and cross-national cooperation. The book is a manifesto of hyper-Wilsonian idealism. Its basic theme is that America is a global empire that has the opportunity to transform itself into the leading proponent of every aspect of global cooperation and good works. Like all such majestic scenarios, it all sounds so easy in the telling, but reality is another story. Garrison's history lessons are rose-colored and flawed, and his perspective on the present world situation follows suit. The book will appeal to those already in the true-believer camp; but it will not convince skeptics. This easy read can be consumed in a few short hours, which is about the amount of time that most of its pronouncements merit consideration. It may grace bookstores for a few weeks, and then it will disappear into the void of hundreds of other such platitude-laden chronicles. Libraries should not invest their resources on a book of such transient nature. ^BSumming Up: Not recommended. J. P. Dunn Converse College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, January 2004
ForeWord Magazine, March 2004
Choice, July 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
In America as Empire, Jim Garrison urges us to face up to the complexities and responsibilities inherent in the indisputable fact that America is now the world's single pre-eminent power. "America," Garrison writes, "has become what it was founded not to be: established as a haven for those fleeing the abuse of power, it has attained and now wields near absolute power. It has become an empire." Garrison traces the roots of the American empire to the country's very beginnings, in particular to the historic willingness of United States to use military might in the defense of two consistent-if sometimes contradictory-foreign policy objectives: protection of U.S. commercial interests and promotion of democracy. How long can the American empire last? Garrison looks at American history within the context of the rise and fall of empires and argues that the U.S. can gain important insights into durability form the Romans. He details the interplay between military power, political institutions and legal structures that enabled the Roman empire at its apogee to last for longer than America has as a country. But the real question is, what kind of empire can and should America be? As the sole superpower, America must lead in shaping a new global order. That international order is now crumbling under the pressures of globalization, persistent poverty, terrorism and fundamentalism. Garrison outlines the kinds of cooperative global structures America must promote if its empire is to leave a lasting legacy of greatness. Garrison calls for Americans to consciously see themselves as a transitional empire, one whose task is not to dominate but to catalyze the next generation of global governance mechanisms that would make obsolete the need for empire. If this is done, America could be the final empire. "Garrison has provided a thoughtful analysis of why America became the strongest nation in history and what responsibilities lay ahead for our nation." -George Soros, Chairman, Soros Fund Management
Main Description
In America as Empire, Jim Garrison urges us to face up to the complexities and responsibilities inherent in the indisputable fact that America is now the world's single preeminent power. "America," Garrison writes, "has become what it was founded not to be: established as a haven for those fleeing the abuse of power, it has attained and now wields near absolute power. It has become an empire. and must now confront what that means." The book asks what kind of empire America can and should be. Written by the president of the State of the World Forum, a global network whose members include such distinguished figures as Mikhail Gorbachev, Oscar Arias, George Schultz, Jane Goodall, and Elie Weisel.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work considers the fact that America has become not merely the strongest nation in the world, but the strongest nation in the history of the world. The author asserts that the U.S. has changed from republic to empire and examines its role and future.
Main Description
America has become not only the strongest nation in the world but the strongest nation in the history of the world. Americans need to understand both why this has happened and what their responsibilities are as the world's dominant power. In this timely and telling book, Jim Garrison, president of the San Francisco-based State of the World Forum, argues that the preoccupation with military expansion is a fatal mistake, citing both FDR and Harry Truman as models for combining military power with institution building. Part of the book is devoted to the Roman empire as another important model, with cautionary lessons about incorporating fairness and respect for other cultures into the governing process. Rome's empire endured for 1,000 years; America's may end far sooner, says Garrison, unless it finds a way to balance might with right. This book provides a blueprint for that balance.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. viii
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introduction: From Republic to Empirep. 2
America and the Worldp. 10
A Mighty Fortress on Shifting Sandsp. 24
America's Journey to Empirep. 48
The Roots of American Preeminencep. 72
Empire and Its Discontentsp. 92
The Rise and Fall of Empiresp. 108
The Roman Achievementp. 128
America at the Choice Pointp. 150
The Final Empirep. 166
Notesp. 203
Indexp. 207
About the Authorp. 218
About State of the World Forump. 220
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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