Catalogue


The 1.5 generation : becoming Korean American in Hawaii /
Mary Yu Danico.
imprint
Honolulu, HI : University of Hawai'i Press ; Los Angeles : UCLA Asian American Studies Center, c2004.
description
xiv, 221 p.
ISBN
0824826957 (paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Honolulu, HI : University of Hawai'i Press ; Los Angeles : UCLA Asian American Studies Center, c2004.
isbn
0824826957 (paper)
catalogue key
5129128
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Mary Yu Danico is associate professor of sociology in the psychology and sociology department at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-11-01:
The "1.5 generation" refers to foreign-born Koreans who came to the US at an early age as children. Introduced as a phrase in the 1970s by Charles Kim, a "Koreatown" reporter, it now enjoys widespread usage. Danico (behavioral sciences, California State Polytechnic Univ., Pomona) subjects the term Ilchom ose, Korean for 1.5 generation, to close scrutiny, examining the processes that led to the formation of this group. Based on her fieldwork in Hawai'i, she defines the 1.5 generation as those Koreans who entered the US before their teenage years. Resocialized in Hawai'i, they were influenced by family, community, and social interactions as they constructed a new identity. Far from being homogeneous, they vary by geography, class, gender, and sexuality. They also share the characteristics of being bicultural and bilingual, and are able to switch among first, 1.5, and second generational identities. Moreover, they have the option of expressing themselves through Korean, Korean American, local, and Western identities. This is an important and thoughtful study that offers valuable insights and draws attention to the need for additional comparative investigations of Asian Americans and other immigrants who are of the 1.5 generation. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Suitable for libraries serving general and academic audiences.. F. Ng California State University, Fresno
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2004
Choice, November 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
The "1.5 generation" (Ilchom ose) refers to Koreans who immigrated to the United States as children. In this first extended look at the 1.5 generation in Hawai'i, Mary Yu Danico attempts to fill a void in the research by addressing the social process through which Korean children are transformed from immigrants into 1.5ers.
Unpaid Annotation
The "1.5 generation" (Ilchomose) refers to Koreans who immigrated to the United States as children. Unlike their first-generation parents and second-generation children born in the United States, 1.5ers have been socialized in both Korean and American cultures and express the cultural values and beliefs of each. In this first extended look at the 1.5 generation in Hawai'i, Mary Yu Danico attempts to fill a void in the research by addressing the social process through which Korean children are transformed from immigrants into 1.5ers. Dozens of informal, in-depth interviews and case studies provide rich data on how family, community, and economic and political factors influence and shape Korean and Korean American identity in Hawai'i. Danico examines the history of Koreans in Hawai'i, their social characteristics, and current demographics. Her close consideration of socio-cultural influences firmly establishes the 1.5 generation in the mainstream discussion of identity formation and race relations.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Who Are the 1.5 Generation Korean Americans?p. 1
Korean Americans in Hawai'ip. 27
Social Construction of Ethnic Identityp. 47
Korean Families Transformedp. 69
Social Class, Family, and Ethnic Identityp. 91
Stereotypes and Their Impact on Ethnic Identity Formationp. 127
Discovering 1.5 Ethnic Identityp. 151
What Do the 1.5 Generation Korean Americans Tell Us?p. 183
Notesp. 197
Referencesp. 205
Indexp. 215
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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