Catalogue


The bamboo gulag : political imprisonment in communist Vietnam /
Nghia M. Vo.
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : London : McFarland, 2004.
description
viii, 244 p. : map ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0786417145
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : London : McFarland, 2004.
isbn
0786417145
catalogue key
5128744
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-11-01:
Political imprisonment in any form is heinous. It is worst in civil wars. After the Vietnam War, the communist government used secret, large-scale, arbitrary, and ruthless techniques to punish and purge away hostile persons and ideas. These techniques included executions, concentration camps (called reeducation camps), banishment to "new economic zones," forced labor, confiscation of property, starvation, and torture. Vo describes 17 reeducation camps in Vietnam using anecdotes from survivors. The author oversimplifies the larger issues of the political conflict. To him, South Vietnam was free and mainly democratic, and he does not discuss the corruption of its leaders. Vo sees North Vietnam as an evil slave state with a failed economy, but he does not ask how its army outclassed that of the south. He believes that the US caused the fall of South Vietnam by withdrawing its forces. Based on the testimony of so-called "boat people," this book needs critical evaluation of its sources and explanations to make clear to general readers why its authorities should be accepted. US readers need solid, nontechnical, historical interpretations of postwar Vietnam. This book addresses but does not satisfy that need. ^BSumming Up: Optional. Graduate students and up. G. H. Davis emeritus, Georgia State University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2004
Choice, November 2004
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Summaries
Main Description
This comprehensive review of the gulag system instituted in communist Vietnam explores the three-pronged approach that was used to convert the rebellious South into a full-fledged communist country after 1975. This book attempts to retrace the path of these imprisoned people from the last months of the war to their escape from Vietnam and explores the emotions that gripped them throughout their stay in the camps. Individual reactions to the camps varied depending on philosophical, emotional and moral beliefs. This reconstruction of those years serves as a memoir for all who were incarcerated in the bamboo gulags.
Main Description
This comprehensive review of the gulag system instituted in communist Vietnam explores the three-pronged approach that was used to convert the rebellious South into a full-fledged communist country after 1975.This book attempts to retrace the path of these imprisoned people from the last months of the war to their escape from Vietnam and explores the emotions that gripped them throughout their stay in the camps. Individual reactions to the camps varied depending on philosophical, emotional and moral beliefs. This reconstruction of those years serves as a memoir for all who were incarcerated in the bamboo gulags.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. 1
North and Southp. 5
The Last Heroesp. 10
Prelude to a Tragedyp. 23
Bamboo Fencesp. 31
A Police Statep. 46
Incarcerationp. 53
Southern Gulagsp. 68
Northern Gulagsp. 93
Starvationp. 117
Executions, Tortures, and Confinementsp. 133
Thought Reformp. 143
Hard Labor and Poor Medical Carep. 151
Defense Mechanismsp. 159
Well-Known Prisonersp. 167
Post-Reeducation Ordealp. 173
New Economic Zonesp. 188
Disillusionp. 198
Of Cemeteriesp. 207
Epiloguep. 215
Glossaryp. 223
Notesp. 225
Bibliographyp. 235
Indexp. 241
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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