Catalogue


The Cultures of creationism : anti-evolutionism in English-speaking countries /
edited by Simon Coleman and Leslie Carlin.
imprint
Aldershot, England : Ashgate, c2004.
description
xv, 195 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
075460912X (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Aldershot, England : Ashgate, c2004.
isbn
075460912X (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5126851
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Simon Coleman is Reader in Anthropology and Deputy Dean, Faculty of Social Sciences and Health, at the University of Durham. Leslie Carlin is affiliated to the School of Population and Health Sciences, University of Newcastle.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2004
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
This book presents the history and the contemporary dimensions of disputes over the emergence of our species. Leading authorities on creationism and creation science are brought together from such disciplines as anthropology, sociology, religious studies, history and philosophy.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Scientific creationism took a severe beating at the notorious Scopes trial but over the years it has gained enormous support. The contributors to this study explore how evolutionism has been usurped by creationism in many countries that have no cultural or traditional ties to fundamentalist American religion.
Long Description
Even in a world where secular scientific discoveries and assumptions have come to dominate the lives of so many people, science cannot be said to have rendered religion obsolete. Since the nineteenth century, one particular debate has been of central importance in apparent conflicts between science and religion: that of evolutionist versus creationist views on human origins.This book presents both the history and the contemporary dimensions of disputes over the emergence of our species. It focuses on the ways in which conservative Protestants have either opposed or attempted to appropriate the languages and methods of secular scientists in defence of a Genesis-based account of the origins of life. Leading authorities on creationism and creation science are brought together from such disciplines as anthropology, sociology, religious studies, history and philosophy. This is the first book to attempt a comprehensive comparative survey of creationist movements around the English-speaking world. A central question addressed by the contributors is why anti-evolutionist ideas appear to flourish in some social and cultural contexts, but are ridiculed in others.
Main Description
Even in a world where secular scientific discoveries and assumptions have come to dominate the lives of so many people, science cannot be said to have rendered religion obsolete. Since the nineteenth century, one particular debate has been of central importance in apparent conflicts between science and religion: that of evolutionist versus creationist views on human origins. This book presents both the history and the contemporary dimensions of disputes over the emergence of our species. It focuses on the ways in which conservative Protestants have either opposed or attempted to appropriate the languages and methods of secular scientists in defence of a Genesis-based account of the origins of life. Leading authorities on creationism and creation science are brought together from such disciplines as anthropology, sociology, religious studies, history and philosophy. This is the first book to attempt a comprehensive comparative survey of creationist movements around the English-speaking world. A central question addressed by the contributors is why anti-evolutionist ideas appear to flourish in some social and cultural contexts, but are ridiculed in others.
Unpaid Annotation
This book presents both the history and the contemporary dimensions of disputes over the emergence of our species. It focuses on the ways in which conservative Protestants have either opposed or attempted to appropriate the languages and methods of secular scientists in defense of a Genesis-based account of the origins of life. Leading authorities on creationism and creation science are brought together from such disciplines as anthropology, sociology, religious studies, history and philosophy.
Table of Contents
List of Contributorsp. vii
Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgementsp. xv
Introduction: The Cultures of Creationism: Shifting Boundaries of Belief, Knowledge and Nationhoodp. 1
The Context of Creationism in Darwin's Englandp. 29
Creationist Discourse and the Management of Political-legal Argumentation: Comparing Britain and the USAp. 45
Creationism, American-Style: Ideology, Tactics and Rhetoric in a Social Movementp. 67
Creationism in Canadap. 85
Creationists and Their Critics in Australia: An Autonomous Culture or 'the USA with Kangaroos'?p. 109
Anti-Evolutionism in the Antipodes: From Protesting Evolution to Promoting Creationism in New Zealandp. 125
The Politics of Indigenous 'Creationism' in Australiap. 145
Creationism among Young People in Kenya and Britainp. 165
The New Creationism: Its Philosophical Dimensionp. 175
Indexp. 193
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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