Catalogue


Who should pay for Medicare? /
Daniel Shaviro.
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, c2004.
description
xiii, 169 p.
ISBN
0226750760 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, c2004.
isbn
0226750760 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Medicare today: key features of the current system -- Medicare's incentive and distributional effects -- A five-part conceptual decomposition of Medicare -- Medicare's social insurance and risk prevention purposes -- Medicare's long-term fiscal gap and its underlying causes -- Significance of Medicare's long-term fiscal gap -- Paying for Medicare I: benefits -- Paying for Medicare II: enrollee contributions -- Paying for Medicare III: other financing to narrow the fiscal gap -- Conclusions and predictions.
catalogue key
5125556
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Daniel Shaviro is professor of law at New York University School of Law.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-12-01:
This little book is a very comprehensive examination of Medicare, the US medical care insurance program for senior citizens and the second largest government program after Social Security. Shaviro (New York Univ. School of Law) writes from a perspective almost exclusively on the revenue side of Medicare (through the public economics lens of who should pay), rather than the typical perspective from the expense side (Medicare costs and who should make cost-incurring decisions about delivery and receipt of services). The book offers an excellent explanation of the complex contours of Medicare: it provides an overview of the key features of Medicare today (with history interwoven); it analyzes Medicare as a fiscal system; it explains Medicare's long-term fiscal gap; and it describes elements necessary for meaningful reform. Only five of its 145 pages are subjective (conclusions, opinions, and predictions), and they are clearly labeled as such. The writing style, in general, is a worthy attempt to reduce requisite economic technicalities to understandable prose through the use of metaphors applied consistently throughout the book. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Graduate students and above. W. E. Foegelle Western Carolina University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
David Shaviro examines the future for Medicare in the US, which is facing an aging population, a slumped economy & administrative inertia. He suggests possible avenues of reform that might reconcile the expected rising costs of healthcare with the anticipated revenues from taxation.
Main Description
Good news first? The good news is that Americans today are living longer, in part because of continual advances in healthcare. But the bad news is that with our aging population larger than ever before, nothing is being done to ensure that we can continue to afford the increasing costs of care. How Medicare--with the Bush administration's reforms and a slumping economy--will meet the needs of its recipients without adequate financing is among the most pressing issues facing this country today. Daniel N. Shaviro sees the future of our national healthcare system as hinging on the issue of funding. The author of books on the economic issues surrounding Social Security and budget deficits, Shaviro is a skilled guide for anyone seeking to understand the financial aspects of government programs. Who Should Pay for Medicare? offers an accessible overview of how Medicare operates as a fiscal system. Discussions of Medicare reform often focus on the expansion of program treatment choices but not on the question of who should pay for Medicare's services. Shaviro's book addresses this critical issue, examining the underanalyzed dynamics of the significant funding gap facing Medicare. He gives a balanced, nonpartisan evaluation of various reform alternatives--considering everything from the creation of new benefits in this fiscal crunch to tax cuts to the demographic pressures we face and the issues this will raise when future generations have to pay for the care of today's seniors. Who Should Pay for Medicare? speaks to seniors who feel entitled to expanded coverage, younger people who wonder what to expect from the government when they retire, and Washington policy makers who need an indispensable guidebook to Medicare's future.
Main Description
Good news first? The good news is that Americans today are living longer, in part because of continual advances in healthcare. But the bad news is that with our aging population larger than ever before, nothing is being done to ensure that we can continue to afford the increasing costs of care. How Medicarewith the Bush administration's reforms and a slumping economywill meet the needs of its recipients without adequate financing is among the most pressing issues facing this country today. Daniel N. Shaviro sees the future of our national healthcare system as hinging on the issue of funding. The author of books on the economic issues surrounding Social Security and budget deficits, Shaviro is a skilled guide for anyone seeking to understand the financial aspects of government programs. Who Should Pay for Medicare? offers an accessible overview of how Medicare operates as a fiscal system. Discussions of Medicare reform often focus on the expansion of program treatment choices but not on the question of who should pay for Medicare's services. Shaviro's book addresses this critical issue, examining the underanalyzed dynamics of the significant funding gap facing Medicare. He gives a balanced, nonpartisan evaluation of various reform alternativesconsidering everything from the creation of new benefits in this fiscal crunch to tax cuts to the demographic pressures we face and the issues this will raise when future generations have to pay for the care of today's seniors. Who Should Pay for Medicare? speaks to seniors who feel entitled to expanded coverage, younger people who wonder what to expect from the government when they retire, and Washington policy makers who need an indispensable guidebook to Medicare's future.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Medicare Today: Key Features of the Current Systemp. 11
Medicare's Incentive and Distributional Effectsp. 26
A Five-Part Conceptual Decomposition of Medicarep. 41
Medicare's Social Insurance and Risk Prevention Purposesp. 56
Medicare's Long-Term Fiscal Gap and Its Underlying Causesp. 76
Significance of Medicare's Long-Term Fiscal Gapp. 92
Paying for Medicare I: Benefitsp. 103
Paying for Medicare II: Enrollee Contributionsp. 114
Paying for Medicare III: Other Financing to Narrow the Fiscal Gapp. 132
Conclusions and Predictionsp. 145
Notesp. 151
Referencesp. 157
Indexp. 165
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem