Catalogue


No there there : race, class, and political community in Oakland /
Chris Rhomberg.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2004.
description
xiii, 315 p.
ISBN
0520236181 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2004.
isbn
0520236181 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5125387
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Chris Rhomberg is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Yale University
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"This sophisticated account of a remarkable city's coalitions and conflicts over half a century is an outstanding contribution to urban history and political analysis. Clearly written and amply supplied with good stories, the book will interest students of urban history, social movements, and American political change."--Charles Tilly, author ofDurable Inequality "An altogether exemplary book. Rhomberg uses a combination of traditional class analysis, an institutional perspective on urban politics, and social movement theory to fashion a rich and persuasive account of the history of urban political conflict in Oakland between 1920-1975. In combining these strands of theory and research, he has also given us a model for the kind of dynamic, historically grounded political sociology that has been sadly missing in recent years."--Doug McAdam, author ofFreedom Summer "Race, class, and local politics are key components of America's social fabric. On the basis of his outstanding scholarly research, Rhomberg examines the complex web of their interaction by focusing on one of the most conflicted urban scenes: Oakland, California; and taking a historical perspective on the evolving pattern of power struggles. This book will become required reading for students of urban politics."--Manuel Castells, author ofThe Rise of the Network Society
Flap Copy
"This sophisticated account of a remarkable city's coalitions and conflicts over half a century is an outstanding contribution to urban history and political analysis. Clearly written and amply supplied with good stories, the book will interest students of urban history, social movements, and American political change."--Charles Tilly, author of Durable Inequality "An altogether exemplary book. Rhomberg uses a combination of traditional class analysis, an institutional perspective on urban politics, and social movement theory to fashion a rich and persuasive account of the history of urban political conflict in Oakland between 1920-1975. In combining these strands of theory and research, he has also given us a model for the kind of dynamic, historically grounded political sociology that has been sadly missing in recent years."--Doug McAdam, author of Freedom Summer "Race, class, and local politics are key components of America's social fabric. On the basis of his outstanding scholarly research, Rhomberg examines the complex web of their interaction by focusing on one of the most conflicted urban scenes: Oakland, California; and taking a historical perspective on the evolving pattern of power struggles. This book will become required reading for students of urban politics."--Manuel Castells, author of The Rise of the Network Society " No There There combines a sophisticated interpretation of political and sociological urban theory with rigorous historical research. . . An important and stimulating book." -Joseph A. Rodriguez, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Western Historical Quarterly
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
This is an intriguing historical look at three periods in Oakland: the heyday of the Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s, the general strike of 1946, and the rise of the Black Panthers in the 1960s.
Long Description
Challenged by Ku Klux Klan action in the '20s, labor protests culminating in a general strike in the '40s, and the rise of the civil rights and black power struggles of the '60s, Oakland, California, seems to encapsulate in one city the broad and varied sweep of urban social movements in twentieth-century America. Taking Oakland as a case study of urban politics and society in the United States, Chris Rhomberg examines the city's successive episodes of popular insurgency for what they can tell us about critical discontinuities in the American experience of urban political community.
Table of Contents
List of Mapsp. vii
Preface and Acknowledgmentsp. ix
No There There: Social Movements and Urban Political Communityp. 1
Corporate Power and Ethnic Patronage: Machine Politics in Oaklandp. 24
The Making of a White Middle Class: The Ku Klux Klan and Urban Reformp. 50
Economic Crisis and Class Hegemony: The Rule of Downtownp. 73
Working-Class Collective Agency: The General Strike and Labor Insurgencyp. 96
Reconstituting the Urban Regime: Redevelopment and the Central Cityp. 120
Bureaucratic Insulation and Racial Conflict: The Challenge of Black Powerp. 145
From Social Movements to Social Change: Oakland and Twentieth-Century Urban Americap. 173
Methodological Appendix: Telling Stories about Actors and Eventsp. 201
Notesp. 209
Bibliographyp. 265
Indexp. 293
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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