Catalogue


Troping Oroonoko from Behn to Bandele /
[edited by] Susan B. Iwanisziw.
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, 2004.
description
xiv, 203 p. : ill.
ISBN
0754634590 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, 2004.
isbn
0754634590 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5123623
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Kristina Bross, Assistant Professor of English/American Studies at Purdue University Jenifer B. Elmore teaches at the Wilkes Honors College of Florida Atlantic University Margaret W. Ferguson, Professor of English at the University of California at Davis Moira Ferguson, the Starr Missouri Professor of English and Women's Studies at the University of Missouri Kansas City Susan B. Iwanisziw, independent scholar Jessica Munns, Professor of Literature at the University of Denver Laura J. Rosenthal, Associate Professor of English at the University of Maryland, College Park Kathryn Rummell, Assistant Professor of English at California Polytechnic State University Rhoda M. Trooboff, recently retired from the Upper School English Department, National Cathedral School for Girls, Washington, DC
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
This volume of essays invites the reader to assess literary texts from within the frame of their own cultural history, which includes issues of authorship and literary or stage convention as well as the social and political institutions that shaped and marketed that literature. The collection initiates just such an in-depth and focused analysis of the complex literary and social history of the royal slave Oroonoko. All seven essays address elements in the evolution of Oroonoko, from Behn's 1688 novella to Southerne's 1696 dramatic adaptation, and thence to the adaptations by Hawkesworth (1759), Gentleman (1760), Anonymous (1760), Ferriar (1788), Bellamy (1789) and Bandele (1999) who serially expropriated the play as a platform to debate responsibility in matters of slavery and colonialism.This study provides rigorous, focused research on a single, complex and controversial topic but also complicates some of our received notions about 'Oroonoko', slavery and abolition.
Bowker Data Service Summary
The contributors to this study explore the tropic formulation of the story of 'Oroonoko', or 'The Royal Slave, A True History' which was published as a novella in 1688 by Aphra Behn.
Long Description
This volume of essays invites the reader to assess literary texts from within the frame of the texts' cultural history, which includes issues of authorship and literary or stage convention as well as the social and political institutions that shaped and marketed that literature. The collection initiates just such an in-depth and focused analysis of the complex literary and social history of the royal slave Oroonoko. All eight essays address elements in the evolution of Oroonoko, from Behn's 1688 novella to Southerne's 1696 dramatic adaptation, and thence to the adaptations by Hawkesworth (1759), Gentleman (1760), Anonymous (1760), Ferriar (1788), Bellamy (1789) and Bandele (1999), who serially expropriated the play as a platform to debate responsibility in matters of slavery and colonialism. Perhaps unique among literary creations, Oroonoko and his entourage, with their distinctive race, class and gender attributes, came into popular consciousness as tropes gauging important shifts in English values during the course of the transatlantic slave trade. Accordingly, this study aims to provide a specific exemplum of rigorous, focused research on a single, complex and controversial topic but also to complicate some of our received notions about Oroonoko, slavery and abolition with a view to encouraging a more rigorous analysis of the cultural history underpinning literary texts..
Unpaid Annotation
This volume of essays invites the reader to assess literary texts from within the frame of the texts' cultural history, which includes issues of authorship and literary or stage convention as well as the social and political institutions that shaped and marketed that literature. All eight essays address elements in the evolution of Oroonoko.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations and Tablesp. vi
List of Contributorsp. vii
Prefacep. viii
Acknowledgementsp. xv
Oroonoko: Birth of a Paradigmp. 1
Juggling the Categories of Race, Class and Gender: Aphra Behn's Oroonokop. 16
'The Fair Imoinda': Domestic Ideology and Anti-Slavery on the Eighteenth-Century Stagep. 35
Cast-Mistresses: The Widow Figure in Oroonokop. 59
Owning Oroonoko: Behn, Southerne, and the Contingencies of Propertyp. 83
Reproducing Oroonoko: A Case Study in Plagiarism, Textual Parallelism, and Creative Borrowingp. 108
The Eighteenth-Century Marketing of Oroonoko: Contending Constructions of Maecenas, the Author and the Slavep. 141
Reviving Oroonoko 'in the scene': From Thomas Southerne to 'Biyi Bandelep. 174
Indexp. 198
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem