Catalogue


Doubly chosen : Jewish identity, the Soviet intelligentsia, and the Russian Orthodox Church /
Judith Deutsch Kornblatt.
imprint
Madison, Wis. : University of Wisconsin Press, c2004.
description
xii, 203 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0299194841 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Madison, Wis. : University of Wisconsin Press, c2004.
isbn
0299194841 (pbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
Russian Jewish Christians -- The Jewish question in Russia : separation of national and religious identity -- The path of faith : the sixties generation -- The path of faith : the eighties generation -- The paths diverge -- Concluding thoughts: The responsibility of chosenness.
catalogue key
5123424
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 165-193) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Judith Deutsch Kornblatt is professor and associate chair of the Department of Slavic Languages and Literature and associate dean for Arts and Humanities at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-11-01:
Kornblatt (Slavic languages and literature, Univ. of Wisconsin--Madison) has written a brief but important book on the conversion of thousands of Jewish intellectuals in the Soviet Union to the Russian Orthodox Church in the 1960s-80s. Penetrating and accessible, the book explores the Jewish search for roots and tradition in the Soviet wasteland and thoughtfully examines the impact of the Jews' conversion on orthodoxy and Soviet society, as well as their own identities as Jews and needs as human beings. In many ways, the book exemplifies Simone Weil's thesis about man's need for roots. The book is based primarily on oral interviews in Russia, Israel, and the US. Fine bibliography and index. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. D. J. Dunn Texas State University-San Marcos
Reviews
Review Quotes
"The phenomenon of Orthodox Christian Jews has been overlooked or ignored by investigators of Soviet and post-Soviet Jewry. As Kornblatt's interviews reveal, however, these converts were fashioning a specifically Jewish form of identity for themselves without analogue in the West."--John D. Klier, author of Russia Gathers Her Jews
" Doubly Chosenhas tremendous theological power. It challenges both Christians and Jews to think harder and in fresh ways about their faith traditions."--Paul Valliere, author of Modern Russian Theology
"The phenomenon of Orthodox Christian Jews has been overlooked or ignored by investigators of Soviet and post-Soviet Jewry. As Kornblatt's interviews reveal, however, these converts were fashioning a specifically Jewish form of identity for themselves without analogue in the West."John D. Klier, author of Russia Gathers Her Jews
"Doubly Chosenhas tremendous theological power. It challenges both Christians and Jews to think harder and in fresh ways about their faith traditions."Paul Valliere, author ofModern Russian Theology
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2004
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
This is the first derailed study of a unique phenomenon in post-Stalinist Russia--the conversion of thousands of Russian Jewish intellectuals to Orthodox Christianity in the 1960s and in the 1980s, the decades before and after the great exodus of Jews from the Soviet Union. Judith Deutsch Kornblatt contends that the choice of baptism into the Church was an act of moral courage in the face of Soviet persecution, motivated by solidarity with Russian Christian dissidents and intellectuals. She considers the dwindling Jewish religious practice in Russia, the transformation of Jews from a religious community to an ethnic one, a longing for spiritual values, and the forging of a new Jewish identity within the dissident movement.
Main Description
Doubly Chosenprovides the first detailed study of a unique cultural and religious phenomenon in post-Stalinist Russia--the conversion of thousands of Russian Jewish intellectuals to Orthodox Christianity, first in the 1960s and later in the 1980s. These time periods correspond to the decades before and after the great exodus of Jews from the Soviet Union. Judith Deutsch Kornblatt contends that the choice of baptism into the Church was an act of moral courage in the face of Soviet persecution, motivated by solidarity with the values espoused by Russian Christian dissidents and intellectuals. Oddly, as Kornblatt shows, these converts to Russian Orthodoxy began to experience their Jewishness in a new and positive way. Working primarily from oral interviews conducted in Russia, Israel, and the United States, Kornblatt underscores the conditions of Soviet life that spurred these conversions: the virtual elimination of Judaism as a viable, widely practiced religion; the transformation of Jews from a religious community to an ethnic one; a longing for spiritual values; the role of the Russian Orthodox Church as a symbol of Russian national culture; and the forging of a new Jewish identity within the context of the Soviet dissident movement.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work provides a detailed study of a phenomenon in post-Stalinist Russia - the conversion of thousands of Russian Jewish intellectuals to Orthodox Christianity in the 1960s and in the 1980s, the decades before and after the great exodus of Jews from the Soviet Union.
Main Description
Doubly Chosenprovides the first detailed study of a unique cultural and religious phenomenon in post-Stalinist Russiathe conversion of thousands of Russian Jewish intellectuals to Orthodox Christianity, first in the 1960s and later in the 1980s. These time periods correspond to the decades before and after the great exodus of Jews from the Soviet Union. Judith Deutsch Kornblatt contends that the choice of baptism into the Church was an act of moral courage in the face of Soviet persecution, motivated by solidarity with the values espoused by Russian Christian dissidents and intellectuals. Oddly, as Kornblatt shows, these converts to Russian Orthodoxy began to experience their Jewishness in a new and positive way. Working primarily from oral interviews conducted in Russia, Israel, and the United States, Kornblatt underscores the conditions of Soviet life that spurred these conversions: the virtual elimination of Judaism as a viable, widely practiced religion; the transformation of Jews from a religious community to an ethnic o≠ a longing for spiritual values; the role of the Russian Orthodox Church as a symbol of Russian national culture; and the forging of a new Jewish identity within the context of the Soviet dissident movement.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Introduction: Russian Jewish Christiansp. 3
The Jewish Question in Russia: Separation of National and Religious Identityp. 33
The Path of Faith: The 1960s Generationp. 52
The Path of Faith: The 1980s Generationp. 84
The Paths Diverge: The Conflict of Identityp. 100
Concluding Thoughts: The Responsibility of Chosennessp. 131
Sample Transcript: Interview with "Marina"p. 145
Father Daniel's Massp. 159
Notesp. 165
Selected Bibliographyp. 185
Indexp. 195
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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