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Stone cold : a Jesse Stone novel /
Robert B. Parker.
imprint
New York : Putnam ; c2003.
description
323 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0399150870 (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Putnam ; c2003.
isbn
0399150870 (acid-free paper)
catalogue key
5116357
A Look Inside
About the Author
BIH Author Biography
Robert B. Parker is the bestselling author of more than forty-one books. He lives in Boston.
Excerpts
Excerpt from Book
1After the murder, they made love in front of a video camera. When it was over, her mouth was bruised. He had long scratches across his back. They lay side by side on their backs, gasping for breath. "Jesus!" he said, his voice hoarse. "Yes," she whispered. She moved into the compass of his left arm and rested her head against his chest. They lay silently for a while, not moving, waiting for oxygen. "I love you," he said. "I love you too," she said. He put his face down against the top of her head where it lay on his chest. Her hair smelled of verbena. In time their breathing settled. "Let's play the video," she whispered. "Let's," he said. The camera stood beside the bed on a tripod. He got up, took the tape from it, put it in the VCR, got back into bed, and picked up the remote from the night table. She moved back into the circle of his arm, her head back on his chest. "Show time," he said, and clicked the remote. They watched. "My God," she said. "Look at me." "I love how you're looking right into the camera," he said. They watched quietly for a little while. "Whoa," she said. "What are you doing to me there?" "Nothing you don't like," he said. When the tape was over he rewound it. "You want to watch again?" he said. She was drawing tiny circles on his chest with her left forefinger. "Yes." He started the tape again. "You know what I loved," she said. "I loved the range of expression on his face." "Yes," he said, "that was great. First it's like, what the hell is this?""And then like, are you serious?""And then, omigod!""That's the best," she said. "The way he looked when he knew we were going to kill him. I've never seen a look like that." "Yes," he said. "That was pretty good." "I wish we could have made it last longer," she said. He shrugged. "My bad," she said. "I got so excited. I shot too soon." "I've been known to do that," he said. "Well, aren't you Mr. Dirty Mouth," she said. They both laughed. "We'll get better at it," he said. She was now rubbing the slow circles on his chest with her full palm, looking at the videotape. "Ohhh," she said. "Look at me! Look at me!" He laughed softly. She moved her hand down his stomach. "What's happening here?" she said. He laughed again. "Ohh," she said. "Good news." She turned her body hard against him and put her face up. "Be careful," she murmured. "My mouth is sore." They made love again while the image of their previous lovemaking moved unseen on the television screen, and the sounds of that mingled with the sounds they were making now. --from Stone Cold: A Jesse Stone Novelby Robert B. Parker, copyright © 2003 Robert B. Parker, published by G. P. Putnam's Sons, a member of Penguin Group (USA) Inc., all rights reserved, reprinted with permission from the publisher.
Flap Copy
Paradise, Massachusetts, police chief Jesse Stone returns, tracking the path of a pair of thrill killers. Fans have embraced each amazing new creation to spring from the fertile imagination of Robert B. Parker. But the praise for his series featuring small-town police chief Jesse Stone is unparalleled: "Melancholy, beautifully wrought," according to Publishers Weekly's starred review of Death in Paradise. "The book's ultimate pleasure lies in prose whose impeccability speaks of decades of careful writing." In Stone Cold, Jesse Stone has a problem no officer of the law likes to face: Dead bodies keep appearing, but clues do not. A man takes his dog out for a run on the beach, only to be discovered hours later-with two holes in his chest. A woman drives her Volvo to the store to do some grocery shopping, and is then found dead, her body crumpled behind her loaded shopping cart. A commuter takes a shortcut home from the train, and never makes it back to his house. Hunting down a serial killer is difficult and dangerous in any town, but in a town like Paradise, where the selectmen and the media add untold pressures, Jesse feels considerable heat. Already walking an emotional tightrope, he stumbles; he's spending too much time with the bottle, and with his ex-wife-neither of which helps him, or the case. And the harder these outside forces push against him, the more Jesse retreats into himself, convinced-despite all the odds-that it's up to him alone to stop the killing. As tough, clear-eyed, and sardonic as Jesse Stone himself, this is the Grand Master working at the peak of his powers.
First Chapter
1

After the murder, they made love in front of a video camera. When it was over, her mouth was bruised. He had long scratches across his back. They lay side by side on their backs, gasping for breath.

"Jesus!" he said, his voice hoarse.

"Yes," she whispered.

She moved into the compass of his left arm and rested her head against his chest. They lay silently for a while, not moving, waiting for oxygen.

"I love you," he said.

"I love you too," she said.

He put his face down against the top of her head where it lay on his chest. Her hair smelled of verbena. In time their breathing settled.

"Let's play the video," she whispered.

"Let's," he said.

The camera stood beside the bed on a tripod. He got up, took the tape from it, put it in the VCR, got back into bed, and picked up the remote from the night table. She moved back into the circle of his arm, her head back on his chest.

"Show time," he said, and clicked the remote.

They watched.

"My God," she said. "Look at me."

"I love how you're looking right into the camera," he said.

They watched quietly for a little while.

"Whoa," she said. "What are you doing to me there?"

"Nothing you don't like," he said.

When the tape was over he rewound it.

"You want to watch again?" he said.

She was drawing tiny circles on his chest with her left forefinger.

"Yes."

He started the tape again.

"You know what I loved," she said. "I loved the range of expression on his face."

"Yes," he said, "that was great. First it's like, what the hell is this?"

"And then like, are you serious?"

"And then, omigod!"

"That's the best," she said. "The way he looked when he knew we were going to kill him. I've never seen a look like that."

"Yes," he said. "That was pretty good."

"I wish we could have made it last longer," she said.

He shrugged.

"My bad," she said. "I got so excited. I shot too soon."

"I've been known to do that," he said.

"Well, aren't you Mr. Dirty Mouth," she said.

They both laughed.

"We'll get better at it," he said.

She was now rubbing the slow circles on his chest with her full palm, looking at the videotape.

"Ohhh," she said. "Look at me! Look at me!"

He laughed softly. She moved her hand down his stomach.

"What's happening here?" she said.

He laughed again.

"Ohh," she said. "Good news."

She turned her body hard against him and put her face up.

"Be careful," she murmured. "My mouth is sore."

They made love again while the image of their previous lovemaking moved unseen on the television screen, and the sounds of that mingled with the sounds they were making now.

--from Stone Cold: A Jesse Stone Novelby Robert B. Parker, copyright © 2003 Robert B. Parker, published by G. P. Putnam's Sons, a member of Penguin Group (USA) Inc., all rights reserved, reprinted with permission from the publisher.

Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2004-04-15:
Jesse Stone, police chief in Paradise, MA, has to cope with teenage rapists, serial killers, alcohol, and stunted emotional relationships. The title refers to all these things: the coldness of the legal system that grants guilty, young gang rapists freedom while the teenage victim continues to suffer; the coldness of serial killers who kill for pleasure; the strength of Jesse, who quits drinking-stone cold; finally, the coldness of his ex-wife, who selfishly keeps Jesse on a string while she continues to enjoy life with other men. Robert Forster reads both productions, which seem to differ only in packaging; his slow, relaxed delivery works well with Parker's plainly constructed sentences and Jesse's reticence. Jesse's mind moves quickly, but his speech is direct and to the point; his few words may reflect the essence of his inner controversy or they may be the result of an unaffected mind-the listener must decide. Forster understands this and with his voice manages to convey both Jesse's complexity and simplicity. This most enjoyable listening experience is recommended for popular collections.-Juleigh Muirhead Clark, John D. Rockefeller Jr. Lib., Colonial Williamsburg Fdn., VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2003-09-22:
It's taken four novels, but finally Parker's Jesse Stone series has produced a book as good as top-drawer Spenser. This outing finds the laconic, troubled cop tackling three problems: to capture the pair of serial killers who are murdering random victims in small-town Paradise, Mass., where Stone is chief of police; to bring to justice the three high-school students who gang-raped a younger schoolmate; and to come to terms with his love of both alcohol and his ex-wife, Jenn. The serial killers, revealed early to the reader and soon enough to Stone, are a married yuppie pair who taunt Stone, whom they take as a dumb hick cop, as he collects evidence to bring them down; his pursuit of them leads them to kill someone close to him, then to target Stone himself, and eventually to an emotionally cathartic climax in Toronto, where the killers have fled. That story line serves as a fine little police procedural, but Parker is at his max here when following the rape plot, especially in scenes in which Stone, in his cool, compassionate way, tries to help the besieged victim as best he can. Meanwhile, under intense media attention and pressure from town elders for the ongoing serial killings, Stone works his way toward an understanding of the roles that booze and Jenn play in his life. Told in third-person prose that's a model of economy, with sharp action sequences, deep yet unobtrusive character exploration and none of the cuteness that can mar the Spenser novels, this is prime Parker, testament to why he was named a Grand Master at the 2002 Edgar Awards. (On sale Sept. 29) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Library Journal, June 2003
Booklist, September 2003
Library Journal, September 2003
Publishers Weekly, September 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Paradise, Massachusetts, police chief Jesse Stone returns, tracking the path of a pair of thrill killers. Investigating a serial killer in an affluent suburban town is difficult, and dangerous, and with the added pressures from the town selectmen and the media, the heat is turned up on Jesse. He's spending too much time with the bottle-and with his ex-wife-neither of which helps him, or the case. And the harder these outside forces push against him, the more Jesse retreats into himself, convinced-despite all the odds-that it's up to him alone to stop the killing. As tough, clear-eyed, and sardonic as Jesse Stone himself, this is the Grand Master working at the peak of his powers.
Unpaid Annotation
From New York Times-bestselling author Robert B. Parker, a new book featuring Paradise, Massachusetts police chief Jesse Stone, tracking the path of a pair of thrill killers.
Unpaid Annotation
Investigating a serial killer in an affluent suburban town is difficult, and dangerous, and with the added pressures from the town selectmen and the media, the heat is turned up on Jesse. He's spending too much time with the bottle-and with his ex-wife-neither of which helps him, or the case. And the harder these outside forces push against him, the more Jesse retreats into himself, convinced-despite all the odds-that it's up to him alone to stop the killing. As tough, clear-eyed, and sardonic as Jesse Stone himself, this is the Grand Master working at the peak of his powers.

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