Catalogue


The Costa Rican Catholic Church, social justice, and the rights of workers, 1979-1996 /
Dana Sawchuk.
imprint
Waterloo, Ont. : Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2004.
description
xiv, 270 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0889204454 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Waterloo, Ont. : Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2004.
isbn
0889204454 :
general note
Published for the Canadian Corporation for Studies in Religion/Corporation canadienne des sciences religieuses.
catalogue key
5112658
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 199-258) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Dana Sawchuk is an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2005
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Summaries
Main Description
Provides a new understanding of the relationship between Church and State in 20th-century Costa Rica. Understanding the relationship between religion and social justice in Costa Rica involves piecing together the complex interrelationships between Church and State - between priests, popes, politics, and the people. This book does just that. Dana Sawchuk chronicles the fortunes of the country's two competing forms of labour organizations during the 1980s and demonstrates how different factions within the Church came to support either the union movement or Costa Rica's home-grown Solidarity movement.
Main Description
Provides a new understanding of the relationship between Church and State in 20th-century Costa Rica. Understanding the relationship between religion and social justice in Costa Rica involves piecing together the complex interrelationships between Church and State - between priests, popes, politics, and the people. This book does just that. Dana Sawchuk chronicles the fortunes of the country's two competing forms of labour organizations during the 1980s and demonstrates how different factions within the Church came to support either the union movement or Costa Rica's home-grown Solidarity movement. Challenging the conventional understanding of Costa Rica as a wholly peaceful and prosperous nation, and traditional interpretations of Catholic Social Teaching, this book introduces readers to a Church largely unknown outside Costa Rica. Sawchuk has carefully analyzed material from a multitude of sources - interviews, newspapers, books, and articles, as well as official Church documents, editorials, and statements by Church representativesto provide a firmly rooted socio-economic history of the experiences of workers, and the Catholic Church's responses to workers in Costa Rica.
Long Description
Provides a new understanding of the relationship between Churchand State in 20th-century Costa Rica.Understanding the relationship between religion and social justicein Costa Rica involves piecing together the complexinterrelationships between Church and State -- between priests,popes, politics, and the people. This book does just that.Dana Sawchuk chronicles the fortunes of the country's twocompeting forms of labour organizations during the 1980s anddemonstrates how different factions within the Church came tosupport either the union movement or Costa Rica's home-grownSolidarity movement.Challenging the conventional understanding of Costa Rica as awholly peaceful and prosperous nation, and traditionalinterpretations of Catholic Social Teaching, this book introducesreaders to a Church largely unknown outside Costa Rica. Sawchukhas carefully analyzed material from a multitude of sources --interviews, newspapers, books, and articles, as well as officialChurch documents, editorials, and statements by Churchrepresentativesto provide a firmly rooted socio-economic historyof the experiences of workers, and the Catholic Church's responsesto workers in Costa Rica.
Main Description
Provides a new understanding of the relationship between Church and State in 20th-century Costa Rica. Understanding the relationship between religion and social justice in Costa Rica involves piecing together the complex interrelationships between Church and State -- between priests, popes, politics, and the people. This book does just that. Dana Sawchuk chronicles the fortunes of the country's two competing forms of labour organisations during the 1980s and demonstrates how different factions within the Church came to support either the union movement or Costa Rica's home-grown Solidarity movement. Challenging the conventional understanding of Costa Rica as a wholly peaceful and prosperous nation, and traditional interpretations of Catholic Social Teaching, this book introduces readers to a Church largely unknown outside Costa Rica. Sawchuk has carefully analysed material from a multitude of sources -- interviews, newspapers, books, and articles, as well as official Church documents, editorials, and statements by Church representativesto provide a firmly rooted socio-economic history of the experiences of workers, and the Catholic Church's responses to workers in Costa Rica.
Table of Contents
Abbreviationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Prefacep. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Studies of the Church and Politics in Latin Americap. 2
Studies of the Pre-1979 Church in Costa Ricap. 3
The Scope and Theme of This Studyp. 5
Theoretical Considerationsp. 8
Chapter Outlinep. 18
Crisis in Costa Ricap. 21
Post-Civil War Economic Developmentp. 21
The Crisis and Government Policiesp. 23
Popular Reactions to the Crisisp. 28
Conclusionp. 31
The Unions in the Face of the Crisisp. 33
Problems for the Costa Rican Union Movementp. 34
Promise in the Costa Rican Union Movementp. 39
Limon en Luchap. 42
Conclusionp. 44
Official Catholic Social Teaching on Workers' Issuesp. 47
Strikes and Unions in Catholic Social Teachingp. 48
Contrasting Approaches to Social Justicep. 55
Persistent Conservatism in Catholic Social Teachingp. 62
Conclusionp. 79
Monsenor Arrieta and CECORp. 81
The Man They Call Manzanitap. 82
The Church Hierarchy's Political Pronouncements and Preferencesp. 83
The Costa Rican Bishops and Workers' Rightsp. 96
Conclusionp. 102
Cecodersp. 109
The Centre's Structure and Programmingp. 109
The Controversial 1986 Folletop. 114
Cecoders and Catholic Social Teachingp. 119
Cecoders and the Union Movementp. 122
Conclusionp. 128
Limon Provincep. 131
Socio-Economic Conditions in Limonp. 132
The Institutional Insecurity of the Limon Churchp. 135
Conclusionp. 140
The ESJ23p. 141
Padre Solano and the Expansion of the ESJ23p. 141
The ESJ23 and Catholic Social Teachingp. 144
Another Side to the School's Successp. 151
Conclusionp. 160
The Official Church in Limonp. 163
The Limon Church under Monsenor Cotop. 163
The 1989 Carta Pastoralp. 167
A New Bishop in a New Diocesep. 174
The Limon Church and Catholic Social Teachingp. 180
Conclusionp. 183
Liberationist and Conservative Catholicisms in Costa Rica and Beyondp. 187
The Conservative-Liberationist Struggle within the Costa Rican Churchp. 187
Final Reflectionsp. 192
Notesp. 199
Bibliographyp. 237
Indexp. 259
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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