Catalogue


Luxury and public happiness : political economy in the Italian Enlightenment /
Till Wahnbaeck.
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2004.
description
x, 228 p.
ISBN
0199269831 (hc)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2004.
isbn
0199269831 (hc)
general note
Based on the author's thesis.
catalogue key
5109923
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
This book provides a rich and detailed account of the approach to luxury of those who published on political economy in France and Italy in the eighteenth century.
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Summaries
Long Description
This work charts the development of political economy in eighteenth-century Italy, and it argues that the focus on economic thought is characteristic of the Italian enlightenment at large. Through an analysis of the debate about luxury, it traces the shaping of a new language of political economy which was inspired by, and contributed to, European debate, but which offered solutions that were as much shaped by intellectual traditions and socio-economic circumstancesas by French or Scottish precedent. Ultimately, those traditions were responsible for the development of very distinct 'cultures of enlightenment' across the peninsula -from the insertion of the economy into the edifice of enlightened Catholicism, to the development of physiocracy in Tuscany, to anew analytical approach to economics in the Milanese enlightenment.Wahnbaeck draws on treatises, academic debates, university lectures, sermons, letters, dictionaries and personal sketches to trace the development of a public culture in Italy in the middle of the century, to establish the channels for the transmission of ideas between Italy, France and Scotland, and the development of an analytical language of economy in Milan in the second half of the century. This workrelates those developments to the socio-economic and political contexts in which they occurred and argues that the focus on the economy (especially in northern Italy) can be explained by a triple reason: against the background of a declining economy and a shift towards agriculture in a competitiveEuropean environment, economic thought addressed the region's most pressing needs; secondly, subjection to Habsburg rule meant that political reform was monopolized in Vienna, whereas economic policy was an area of developed government and hence offered a safe route to influence without infringing on Hapsburg prerogatives; and finally, advances in economic thinking in Milan in particular provided a claim to power against the previous generation which had dominated the field of jurisprudence.
Long Description
Through an analysis of the eighteenth-century debate about luxury, Wahnbaeck traces the shaping of a new language of political economy. By charting not only the development of political economy in Italy, but the methods of transmission of the ideas at the heart of this debate, the author argues that the focus on economic thought is characteristic of the Italian enlightenment at large. Ultimately, these methods were responsible for the development of very distinct 'cultures of enlightenment' across the Italian peninsula.
Table of Contents
The European Debate About Luxury
The Meaning of the Term: Shifts and Extensions
Enlightenment Views of Luxury
The Origins of Political Economy in Italy
Public Culture and the Transmission of Ideas
Tuscany: The Politics of Reform in an Agricultural Land
Tuscan Economic Thought: Ministerial Memoranda and Public Discourse
The Tuscan Luxury Debate between Morals and Economics
The Development of a New Language of Political Economy
Lombardy: Enlightenment from Above and from Within
Pietro Verri, Cesare Beccaria, and the Beginning of the Debate
The Shaping of a Political Economy in the Milanese Enlightenment
Conclusion
Bibliography
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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