Catalogue


After the expulsion : West Germany and Eastern Europe, 1945-1990 /
Pertti Ahonen.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2003.
description
viii, 313 p. : map ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0199259895
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2003.
isbn
0199259895
catalogue key
5106887
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [280]-305) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-10-01:
In the aftermath of WW II, approximately 15 million Poles, Ukrainians, Hungarians, Lithuanians, and (above all) Germans were forcibly resettled. About eight million ended up in the Western zones of occupation, while four million found themselves in the Soviet zone. In After the Expulsion, Ahonen (Univ. of Tampere, Finland) examines the issue of the expellees from a refreshing angle. While most scholars have investigated the socioeconomic integration, Ahonen analyzes the problem of the expellees in relation to West Germany's policy toward Eastern Europe. He explores the paradox that has persisted all the way to German reunification in 1990. If the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) was radically different from the Third Reich, why then have Bonn's foreign policy statements over the years raised doubts about the FRG's presumed peaceful intentions toward Eastern Europe? Why had West Germany delayed normalizing relations with the Eastern European countries until the late 1960s? Why, finally, did West German elites consistently refuse to recognize the Oder-Neisse line that separates Poland and East Germany? The answer lies with the politically influential "expellee organizations" within Germany. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. Granville Stanford University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Ahonen's conclusions are convincingly argued, and his book on the whole offers a clear and compelling narrative of the development of expellee organizations and their influence on policy up to 1969, covering the period after 1969 in a brief concluding chapter....Ahonen's work will be essential reading for all students and scholars of postwar West German politics and diplomacy."--American Historical Review
...an easily accessible and very readable contribution
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text examines the long-term consequences of the largest 'ethnic cleansing' operation in 20th-century Europe - the removal of up to 15 million Germans from Central and Eastern Europe at the end of the Second World War.
Main Description
This book breaks new ground by connecting two central problems faced by the Federal Republic of Germany prior to reunification in 1990, both of them rooted in the Second World War. Domestically, the country had to integrate eight million expellees forced out of their homes in Central and Eastern Europe as a result of the lost war. Externally, it had to re-establish relations with Eastern Europe, despite the burdens of the Nazi past, the expulsions, and the ongoing East-West struggle in the Cold War.
Main Description
This book breaks new ground by connecting two central problems faced by the Federal Republic of Germany prior to reunification in 1990, both of them rooted in the Second World War. Domestically, the country had to integrate eight million expellees forced out of their homes in Central andEastern Europe as a result of the lost war. Externally, it had to re-establish relations with Eastern Europe, despite the burdens of the Nazi past, the expulsions, and the ongoing East-West struggle in the Cold War. This study shows how the long-term consequences of the expellee problemsignificantly hindered West German efforts to develop normal ties to the East European states. In particular, it emphasizes a point largely overlooked in the existing literature: the way in which the political integration of the expellees into the Federal Republic had unanticipated negativeconsequences for the country's Ostpolitik.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Establishing the Pattern 1949-1955
From the Expulsions to the Rise of the Expellee Organizations
The Programmes and Strategies of the Expellee Organizations
The Responses and Policies of the Main Parties
Adenauer's Foreign Policy and the Expellees
the Pattern in Practice 1949-1966
Ostpolitik Options and Expellee Influence 1955-1959
Ostpolitik Options and Expellee Influence 1959-1966
The Collapse of the Pattern 1966-1969
The Grand Coalition as the Turning-Point 1966-1969
From the New Ostpolitik to Reunification 1969-1970
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem