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Woodrow Wilson and the lost world of the oratorical statesman /
Robert Alexander Kraig.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
College Station : Texas A&M University Press, c2004.
description
xii, 244 p.
ISBN
1585442755 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
College Station : Texas A&M University Press, c2004.
isbn
1585442755 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
The ends of oratory -- The education of the orator -- Literary politician -- The oratorical revival and the emergence of Woodrow Wilson -- The creation of the oratorical president -- The leader and the cause : the western tour of 1919.
catalogue key
5103640
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Robert Kraig has written a splendid book that illuminates a central aspect of Woodrow Wilson's thought and politics. As Kraig makes clear, any effort to understand Wilson must come to terms with his life-long idealization of the statesman-orator. Among the many impressive aspects of this richly documented study is its convincing reinterpretation of Wilson's words and deeds during the League of Nations debate. . . . Should be required reading for historians, political scientists, and students of rhetoric alike."--Stephen E. Lucas, Evjue-Bascom Professor in the Humanities, University of Wisconsin
�Robert Kraig has written a splendid book that illuminates a central aspect of Woodrow Wilson�s thought and politics. As Kraig makes clear, any effort to understand Wilson must come to terms with his life-long idealization of the statesman-orator. Among the many impressive aspects of this richly documented study is its convincing reinterpretation of Wilson�s words and deeds during the League of Nations debate. . . . Should be required reading for historians, political scientists, and students of rhetoric alike.�--Stephen E. Lucas, Evjue-Bascom Professor in the Humanities, University of Wisconsin
This item was reviewed in:
Wall Street Journal, November 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
"I wish there were some great orator who would go about and make men drunk with this spirit of selfsacrifice . . . whose tongue might every day carry abroad the gold accents of that creative age in which we were born a nation; accents which would ring like tones of reassurance around the whole circle of the globe." These rousing words of academician Woodrow Wilson foreshadowed the role oratory would play in his own political career--a career that saw him triumph on his domestic agenda largely through his inspirational message but fail in his most cherished dream, the League of Nations, when words were not enough. Robert Kraig's path-breaking study of Wilson's political philosophy of the oratorical statesman traces the classical influences on him as a young man, the development of his full-blown scholarly philosophy of oratory, and his use of rhetoric as governor of New Jersey and president of the United States. Although Wilson's reputation as one of the most eloquent American presidents is firmly established, treatments of his life and presidency have largely ignored how his rhetorical leadership was formed. Kraig addresses this oversight by examining the rich neoclassical traditions of Anglo-American oratory and statesmanship, the rhetorical pedagogy of the Gilded Age, and the development of Wilson's own political thought. He concludes with consideration of how Wilson's conception of oratorical leadership influenced his innovative conduct of the presidency. The result is a revisionist interpretation of Wilson's presidency that gives it a clearer historical context, shedding light on a neglected dimension of the political culture of the Progressive Era. In the process, Kraig reopens the question of how effective Wilson's effort for international cooperation might have been had illness not struck him down.
Unpaid Annotation
"I wish there were some great orator who would go about and make men drunk with this spirit of self-sacrifice...whose tongue might everyday carry abroad the gold accents of that creative age..." These rousing words of academician Woodrow Wilson foreshadowed the role oratory would play in his own political career--a career that saw him triumph on his domestic agenda largely through his inspirational message but fail in his most cherished dream, the League of Nations, when words were not enough. Robert Krag's path-breaking study of Wilson's political philosophy of the oratorical statesman traces the classical influences on him as a young man, the development of his full-blown scholarly philosophy of oratory, and his use of rhetoric as governor of new Jersey and president of the United States. In the process, Kraig reopens the question of how effective Wilson's effort for international cooperation might have been had illness not struck him down.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Prologue: The Ends of Oratoryp. 3
The Education of the Oratorp. 11
Literary Politicianp. 44
The Oratorical Revival and the Emergence of Woodrow Wilsonp. 98
The Creation of the Oratorical Presidentp. 120
The Leader and the Cause: The Western Tour of 1919p. 141
Notesp. 187
Bibliographyp. 221
Indexp. 235
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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