Catalogue


Corps and clienteles : public finance and political change in France, 1688-1715 /
Mark Potter.
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2003.
description
x, 217 p. : ill.
ISBN
0754637263 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2003.
isbn
0754637263 (alk. paper)
general note
Based on the author's thesis (Ph. D.--University of California, Los Angeles, 1997) presented under the title: The institutions of absolutism: politics and finance in France, 1680-1715.
catalogue key
5102900
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Corps and Clienteles offers a unique approach to the history of absolutism in France by focusing on the intersection between institutions and personal relationships surrounding Louis XIV's final two wars. Arguing that Louis appealed to the elite for financial support to wage war, it demonstrates how he stabilised many of the structures on which the elite stood, entrenched elements of privilege throughout the political landscape, and devolved power to provincial institutions. The politics of war finance in the last twenty five years of Louis's reign thus profoundly impacted the direction in which absolutism developed through the remainder of the Old Regime.
Bowker Data Service Summary
The French public finances of the 17th century have been thoroughly studied and documented. The author's intention in this study is rather to fill an historiographical gap whilst charting some new ground in our modern understanding of the French absolutist state.
Long Description
Few historians would deny that Louis XIV's France dominated the political, cultural and military landscape of late seventeenth century Europe. Yet, the financial foundations on which French hegemony were based remain open to question. Traditionally the regime has been viewed as the archetypal centralizing monarchy in which warfare was the main motor driving reform. Yet recent research has pointed to a more subtle interpretation in which power was negotiated and interests balanced between the crown and members of the elite.Corps and Clienteles offers a unique approach to this debate by focusing on the intersection between institutions and personal relationships in the financial strategies surrounding Louis XIV's final two wars. It argues that, in appealing to the elite for financial support to wage war, Louis in return stabilised many of the structures on which the elite stood, entrenched elements of privilege throughout the political landscape, and devolved power to provincial institutions. Especially with the participation of privileged corps as financial intermediaries, the politics of war finance in the last twenty five years of Louis' reign profoundly influenced the direction in which absolutism developed through the remainder of the Old Regime.The book situates the period 1688 to 1715 as a crucial stage in the development of absolutism; tying the choices available to Louis XIV with the structures and institutions that he inherited from his predecessors, while setting his approach apart. By also measuring the impact of financial negotiations between crown and corps on the later state, it is argued that absolutism under Louis was neither ossified nor in crisis, as the latter half of his reign is often described, but rather dynamic and flexible as it sought to meet the financial costs of warfare.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. vi
List of Tablesp. vii
Prefacep. ix
Absolutism and the Old-Regime Elite
Introductionp. 3
Venality Entrenched: The Property Rights of Office Holding Under Louis XIVp. 28
Crown and Province
Estates and Ruling Coalitions in Burgundyp. 51
Royal Strategies and Elite Responses in Normandyp. 100
Corps and Clienteles in Public Finance
Lenders and Money Handlersp. 135
Intermediating Corps and Financial Clientelesp. 158
Conclusionp. 182
Merchants and the Rouennais Town Councilp. 195
Privilege and Louis XIV's Divide-and-Rule Strategiesp. 200
Data Sources for Lending Clientelesp. 203
Bibliographyp. 205
Indexp. 215
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem