Catalogue


To see with two eyes : peasant activism & Indian autonomy in Chiapas, Mexico /
Shannan L. Mattiace.
imprint
Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, c2003.
description
xviii, 204 p. : ill., maps.
ISBN
0826323154 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, c2003.
isbn
0826323154 (pbk. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5101311
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Shannan L. Mattiace is an assistant professor of political science at Allegheny College in Meadville, Pennsylvania. She teaches and writes on Latin American social movements, race and identity, and culture and politics
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-07-01:
Perhaps the most important and yet enigmatic issue of contention to arise from the 1994 Zapatista uprising in Chiapas, Mexico, was the question of Indian rights and autonomy. The only accords signed between rebels and the government addressed that question and promised reform, even as numerous other Latin American countries have similarly had to restructure their relationships with indigenous peoples. But what are "Indian rights" and "Indian autonomy"? Political scientist Mattiace (Allegheny College) does not explore what those terms should mean. Rather, she draws on years of fieldwork in Mexico and her own direct participation in some relevant forums of debate in Chiapas to portray how different parties brought to the negotiating tables very different notions of rights and autonomy, derived from their contrasting social and economic contexts and historical experiences. Mattiace explains the recent upsurge in ethnic demands as just the most recent development in a decades-long history of agrarian organizing and struggle. Argument continues south of the US border on how to change Mexico's political and judicial systems to accommodate the multicultural character of their society. This book is the best introduction available to that debate. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels and libraries. P. R. Sullivan independent scholar
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2004
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Summaries
Main Description
Throughout Latin America, native peoples have long been viewed as obstacles to development. In Mexico, beginning in the late 1930s, the government organized indigenous peoples into peasant organizations tied to the official party in an attempt to assimilate them into mestizo society. The unexpected result was the emergence of political consciousness among Indians in Chiapas, Mexico. Since the 1994 Zapatista uprising, indigenous peasants increasingly have cast their demands within a framework of legal and cultural autonomy. In this book, based on fieldwork in eastern Chiapas with the Tojolabal-Maya people, Shannan Mattiace shows that on the ground, the struggle for autonomy is integrally related to peasant politics and everyday struggles for survival. Her years of fieldwork prior to 1994, and after, have provided her with important ethnographic accounts and extensive interviews. To See With Two Eyeswill be of interest to scholars in Latin American political science, anthropology, and history. "Mattiace has conducted original research on an incredibly important topic. While she is particularly interested in Chiapas, she situates the Zapatista experience in broader perspective-analyzing the Zapatistas against Mexico's historical record of popular organizing, contemporary indigenous movements in other parts of Mexico, and other indigenous movements in Latin America."--Professor Deborah Yashar, Princeton University
Unpaid Annotation
Mattiace shows the struggle for autonomy is integrally related to peasant politics and everyday struggles for survival.
Main Description
Throughout Latin America, native peoples have long been viewed as obstacles to development. In Mexico, beginning in the late 1930s, the government organised indigenous peoples into peasant organisations tied to the official party in an attempt to assimilate them into mestizo society. The unexpected result was the emergence of political consciousness among Indians in Chiapas, Mexico. Since the 1994 Zapatista uprising, indigenous peasants increasingly have cast their demands within a framework of legal and cultural autonomy. In this book, based on fieldwork in eastern Chiapas with the Tojolabal-Maya people, Shannan Mattiace shows that on the ground, the struggle for autonomy is integrally related to peasant politics and everyday struggles for survival. Her years of fieldwork prior to 1994, and after, have provided her with important ethnographic accounts and extensive interviews. 'To See With Two Eyes' will be of interest to scholars in Latin American political science, anthropology, and history.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vi
Prefacep. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Glossary of Acronymsp. xv
Introductionp. 1
The Politics of Culturep. 10
"Somos Campesinos": Land and Agrarian Politicsp. 30
No More Fearp. 49
State, Nation, and the "Indian Question"p. 55
After January 1, 1994: Indigenismop. 83
Tierra, libertad, y autonomia: Indian Autonomy and the EZLN Uprisingp. 87
The Voice of the Southern Border: XEVFSp. 112
The Dialogue of San Andres and Mexico's Transition to Democracyp. 117
Women's Rights and Indian Lawp. 134
Conclusion: Ethnic Autonomy Regimes in Latin Americap. 140
Notesp. 156
Works Citedp. 181
Indexp. 198
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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