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Without regard to race : the other Martin Robison Delany /
Tunde Adeleke.
imprint
Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c2003.
description
xxxiii, 274 p.
ISBN
1578065984 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c2003.
isbn
1578065984 (alk. paper)
contents note
Black biography : from instrumentalism to functionalism -- Delany historiography -- First integrationist phase : moral suasion -- Second integrationist phase : 1863-1874 -- Third integrationist phase : 1875-1877 -- Final years : 1878-1885.
catalogue key
5100798
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Tunde Adeleke is professor of history and director of African American studies at the University of Montana, Missoula.
Excerpts
Flap Copy
A biographical reassessment of the racial activist and the way his views have been portrayed
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-09-01:
Students of 19th-century African American leadership are familiar with Martin Delany, crusader for black emigration and nationalist schemes in the 1850s, combat officer during the Civil War, and tireless fighter for black equality until his death in 1885. Delany has usually been portrayed as the uncompromising pioneer of black nationalism, a militant precursor of W.E.B. DuBois, Marcus Garvey, and others. Several scholars during the civil rights era saw Delany as the model for the contemporary crusaders for racial pride, pan-Africanism, and black separation. That portrait has remained pretty much unchecked until this fuller, more balanced account by Adeleke (Univ. of Montana), who finds it inadequate to pass Delany off as a one-dimensional militant. Through careful research, he makes a compelling case that Delany was a complex man who was more pragmatic, compromising, and conservative than his earlier portrayals suggest. Most important, he was not a doctrinaire separatist but, in fact, focused on strategies for racial integration in the post-Civil War US. The study includes 28 pages of notes, largely from primary sources; appendixes of Delany correspondence; and a rich bibliography of primary and secondary sources. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. University and general libraries with strong collections in African American history. R. Detweiler California Polytechnic State University--San Luis Obispo
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2004
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Summaries
Main Description
Before Marcus Garvey and W. E. B. Du Bois lifted the banner for black liberation and independence, Martin Robison Delany (1812-1885) was at the forefront. He was the first black appointed as a combat major in the Union army during the Civil War. He was a pan-Africanist and a crusader for black freedom and equality in the nineteenth century. For the past three decades, however, this precursor has been regarded only as a militant black nationalist and "racial essentialist." To his discredit, his ideas, programs, and accomplishments have been maintained as models of uncompromising militancy. Classifying Delany solely for his militant nationalist rhetoric crystalizes him into a one-dimensional figure. This study of his life and thought, the first critical biography of the pivotal African American thinker written by a historian, challenges the distorting portrait and, arguing that Delany reflects the spectrum of the nineteenth-century black independence movement, makes a strong case for bringing him closer to the center position of the liberal mainstream. He displayed a far greater degree of optimism about the future of blacks in America than has been acknowledged, and he faced pragmatic socio-economic realities that made it possible for him to be flexible for compromise. Focusing on neglected phases in his intellectual life, this book reveals Delany as a personality who was neither uncompromisingly militant nor dogmatically conservative. It argues that his complex strategies for racial integration were much more focused on America than on separateness and nationalism. The extreme characterization of him that has been prominent in the contemporary mind reflects ideologies of scholars whocame of age during the civil rights era, the period that initially inspired great interest in his life. This new look at him paints a portrait of the "other Delany, " a thinker able to reach across racial boundaries to offer co
Main Description
Before Marcus Garvey and W. E. B. Du Bois lifted the banner for black liberation and independence, Martin Robison Delany (1812-1885) was at the forefront. He was the first black appointed as a combat major in the Union army during the Civil War. He was a pan-Africanist and a crusader for black freedom and equality in the nineteenth century. For the past three decades, however, this precursor has been regarded only as a militant black nationalist and "racial essentialist." To his discredit, his ideas, programs, and accomplishments have been maintained as models of uncompromising militancy. Classifying Delany solely for his militant nationalist rhetoric crystalizes him into a one-dimensional figure. This study of his life and thought, the first critical biography of the pivotal African American thinker written by a historian, challenges the distorting portrait and, arguing that Delany reflects the spectrum of the nineteenth-century black independence movement, makes a strong case for bringing him closer to the center position of the liberal mainstream. He displayed a far greater degree of optimism about the future of blacks in America than has been acknowledged, and he faced pragmatic socio-economic realities that made it possible for him to be flexible for compromise. Focusing on neglected phases in his intellectual life, this book reveals Delany as a personality who was neither uncompromisingly militant nor dogmatically conservative. It argues that his complex strategies for racial integration were much more focused on America than on separateness and nationalism. The extreme characterization of him that has been prominent in the contemporary mind reflects ideologies of scholars who came of age during the civil rights era, the period that initially inspired great interest in his life. This new look at him paints a portrait of the "other Delany," a thinker able to reach across racial boundaries to offer compromise and dialogue. Tunde Adeleke, director of African American studies at the University of Montana, Missoula, is the author of UnAfrican Americans: Nineteenth-Century Black Nationalists and the Civilizing Missionand editor of Booker T. Washington: Interpretive Essays.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Introductionp. xix
Black Biography: From Instrumentalism to Functionalismp. 3
Delany Historiographyp. 19
First Integrationist Phase: Moral Suasion, 1830-1849p. 40
Second Integrationist Phase: 1863-1874p. 70
Third Integrationist Phase: 1875-1877p. 135
Final Years: 1878-1885p. 161
Conclusionp. 178
"A Political Review"p. 194
"Trial and Conviction"p. 210
Notesp. 228
Bibliographyp. 256
Indexp. 269
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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