Catalogue


The rape of Belgium : the untold story of World War I /
Larry Zuckerman.
imprint
New York : New York University Press, 2004.
description
xi, 339 p. : map.
ISBN
0814797040 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : New York University Press, 2004.
isbn
0814797040 (alk. paper)
contents note
1. Your neighbor's roof -- 2. Marching through hell -- 3. The ghost of 1870 -- 4. Belgium does not ask for pity -- 5. A vague and misty unreality -- 6. This poisoned atmosphere -- 7. At least they only drown your women -- 8. Hell's premises -- 9. Taking note of these things -- 10. Mort pour la patrie -- 11. Like a thief in the night -- 12. It is impossible that we will be abandoned -- 13. A trifle -- 14. A popular delusion.
catalogue key
5097412
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Larry Zuckerman is the author of The Potato: How the Humble Spud Rescued the Western World, which has been translated into four languages. The British edition was the recipient of the Andre Simon Special Commendation Award, given annually to a book on culinary arts
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2003-11-15:
Zuckerman argues that the atrocity stories about Germany's "rape of Belgium," which were so widely reported and discredited, have in fact distracted from telling the history of Belgian life under German occupation during World War I. Zuckerman, an independent scholar, begins his account with a discussion of the German decision to violate Belgian neutrality, a choice that violated international law and ensured Britain's entering the conflagration. Zuckerman goes on to juxtapose the genesis and propagation of the image of the "rape of Belgium" with the reality of events on the ground. His analysis of German attacks on Belgian civilians follows the story told in John N. Horne and Alan Kramer's German Atrocities 1914: History of a Denial. Zuckerman's strengths are his detailed analysis of the tribulations of Belgian civilians forced to endure mass expropriations, arbitrary and administratively chaotic occupation, and chronic hunger. That thousands of Belgian civilians were sent to Germany as forced labor might be regarded as a premonition of the next war. Zuckerman is weaker in placing German policy toward Belgium into comparative perspective, a perspective that could only strengthen an already solid book. A welcome addition to the literature, this is recommended for all history collections.-Frederic Krome, Jacob Rader Marcus Ctr. of the American Jewish Archives, Cincinnati (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 2004-10-01:
The German march through Belgium in 1914 generated a host of spectacular atrocity stories that verged on "patriotic-pornography" and obscured the country's systematic plundering. German crimes during the invasion were serious enough: the shooting of hundreds, perhaps thousands of civilians; the burning of towns, including the infamous episode of the medieval library at Louvain. These horrors were but the prologue to a four-year occupation that saw Belgium stripped of much of its heavy industry, starved by German confiscations, and subjected to forced deportations of hundreds of thousands of its workers. Belgium would never recover its ranking as the world's sixth industrial power, not only because of the war, but also because of the politics of peacemaking, which ultimately focused on the plight of Germany and ignored her victims. Zuckerman has mined Belgium's archives to depict a German occupation that presaged the Nazi era. He illustrates how the falsity of the most lurid atrocity accounts rendered public opinion dubious or indifferent to the real "rape of Belgium," and thus allowed Germany to escape accountability for its crimes. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. All collections. G. P. Cox Gordon College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Li has accomplished something different and very important. He has placed the 'rise of China' from the Mao era to today in the context of the history of the entire world-system. He makes a persuasive case." - Immanuel Wallerstein, Yale University
"More than a footnote to history, The Rape of Belgiummakes us look afresh at the story of German behavior in occupied Belgium during World War I. We can no longer dismiss the stories-the killing of innocent civilians, the burning of priceless libraries, the plundering of Belgian resources, and the forced deportations of thousands of Belgians to work in Germany-as simply Allied propaganda. Larry Zuckerman argues with passion and meticulous research that both the Allies and the Germans themselves failed to confront the crucial legal and moral questions raised by the occupation."
"More than a footnote to history, The Rape of Belgium makes us look afresh at the story of German behavior in occupied Belgium during World War I. We can no longer dismiss the stories-the killing of innocent civilians, the burning of priceless libraries, the plundering of Belgian resources, and the forced deportations of thousands of Belgians to work in Germany-as simply Allied propaganda. Larry Zuckerman argues with passion and meticulous research that both the Allies and the Germans themselves failed to confront the crucial legal and moral questions raised by the occupation." - Margaret MacMillan, author of Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed the World
"Zuckerman has given a clear and informative account of the ways in which the occupation of Belgium had a significance transcending the borders of one small European country. That is a major achievement."
"Zuckerman has given a clear and informative account of the ways in which the occupation of Belgium had a significance transcending the borders of one small European country. That is a major achievement." - H-Net Book Review
"Zuckerman has mined Belgium's archives to depict a German occupation that presaged the Nazi era. He illustrates how the falsity of the most lurid atrocity accounts rendered public opinion dubious or indifferent to the real "rape of Belgium," and thus allowed Germany to escape accountability for its crimes." - CHOICE
"Zuckerman has mined Belgium's archives to depict a German occupation that presaged the Nazi era. He illustrates how the falsity of the most lurid atrocity accounts rendered public opinion dubious or indifferent to the real "rape of Belgium," and thus allowed Germany to escape accountability for its crimes." -CHOICE
"More than a footnote to history, The Rape of Belgiummakes us look afresh at the story of German behavior in occupied Belgium during World War I. We can no longer dismiss the stories-the killing of innocent civilians, the burning of priceless libraries, the plundering of Belgian resources, and the forced deportations of thousands of Belgians to work in Germany-as simply Allied propaganda. Larry Zuckerman argues with passion and meticulous research that both the Allies and the Germans themselves failed to confront the crucial legal and moral questions raised by the occupation." - Margaret MacMillan, author of Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed the World
"Belgium's occupation by the Imperial German army between 1914 and 1918, Larry Zuckerman's important new book shows, provided a blueprint for the Nazi occupation of Europe 25 years later. With compelling evidence and compassion, he has drawn our attention back to a moment when total war began, and when everybody came to see that when military hostilities begin, no one-man, woman or child-is safe. Modern war and atrocity are now interchangeable terms; as this book demonstrates, they became inextricably tied together in Belgium a century ago, and the world has never been the same again."
"Belgium's occupation by the Imperial German army between 1914 and 1918, Larry Zuckerman's important new book shows, provided a blueprint for the Nazi occupation of Europe 25 years later. With compelling evidence and compassion, he has drawn our attention back to a moment when total war began, and when everybody came to see that when military hostilities begin, no one-man, woman or child-is safe. Modern war and atrocity are now interchangeable terms; as this book demonstrates, they became inextricably tied together in Belgium a century ago, and the world has never been the same again." - Jay Winter, Yale University
"A thought-provoking account. Li considers the consequences of the entry of China into the global capitalist system, in light of the challenges facing human society from economic, political, and environmental constraints. This book makes a major contribution." - David M. Kotz, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
"A lively and lucid synthesis. Larry Zuckerman's intelligent, well-documented, and eminently readable account of Belgium s maltreatment during World War I highlights war crimes too often dismissed as figments of propaganda. This book deserves to be read very widely indeed."
"A lively and lucid synthesis. Larry Zuckerman's intelligent, well-documented, and eminently readable account of Belgium s maltreatment during World War I highlights war crimes too often dismissed as figments of propaganda. This book deserves to be read very widely indeed." - Sophie De Schaepdrijver, Pennsylvania State University
"Zuckerman has mined Belgium's archives to depict a German occupation that presaged the Nazi era. He illustrates how the falsity of the most lurid atrocity accounts rendered public opinion dubious or indifferent to the real "rape of Belgium," and thus allowed Germany to escape accountability for its crimes."
"Zuckerman has given a clear and informative account of the ways in which the occupation of Belgium had a significance transcending the borders of one small European country. That is a major achievement." -H-Net Book Review
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, November 2003
Choice, October 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
View the Table of Contents. Read the Introduction. Zuckerman has given a clear and informative account of the ways in which the occupation of Belgium had a significance transcending the borders of one small European country. That is a major achievement. -H-Net Book Review Zuckerman has mined Belgium's archives to depict a German occupation that presaged the Nazi era. He illustrates how the falsity of the most lurid atrocity accounts rendered public opinion dubious or indifferent to the real rape of Belgium, and thus allowed Germany to escape accountability for its crimes.-CHOICE Larry Zuckerman's vividly written and argumentative study engages with many aspects of Belgian History. -The Times Literary A welcome addition to the literature, this is recommended for all history collections. - Library Journal A fresh and fascinating examination of the German occupation of Belgium during World War I and its historical consequences. A well-written and thoroughly documented study. -Salem Press In August 1914, the German Army invaded the neutral nation of Belgium, violating a treaty that the German chancellor dismissed as a scrap of paper. The invaders terrorized the Belgians, shooting thousands of civilians and looting and burning scores of towns, including Louvain, which housed the country's preeminent university. The Rape of Belgium recalls the bloodshed and destruction of the 1914 invasion, and the outrage it inspired abroad. Yet Larry Zuckerman does not stop there, and takes us on a harrowing journey over the next fifty months, vividly documenting Germany's occupation of Belgium. The occupiers plundered the country, looting its rich supply of natural resources; deporting Belgians en masse to Germany and northern France as forced laborers; and jailing thousands on contrived charges, including the failure to inform on family or neighbors. Despite the duration of the siege and the destruction left in its wake, in considering Belgium, neither the Allies nor the history books focused on the occupation, and instead cast their attention almost wholly on the invasion. Now, The Rape of Belgium draws on a little-known story to remind us of the horrors of war. Further, Zuckerman shows why the Allies refrained from punishing the Germans for the occupation and controversially suggests that had the victors followed through, Europe's reaction to the rise of Nazi Germany might have taken a very different course.
Main Description
In recent years, China has become a major actor in the global economy, making a remarkable switch from a planned and egalitarian socialism to a simultaneously wide-open and tightly controlled market economy. Against the establishment wisdom, Minqi Li argues in this provocative and startling book that far from strengthening capitalism, China's full integration into the world capitalist system will, in fact and in the not too distant future, bring about its demise. The author tells us that historically the spread and growth of capitalist economies has required low wages, taxation, and environmental costs, as well as a hegemonic nation to prevent international competition from eroding these requirements. With the decline of the economic power of the United States, its current hegemonic role will deteriorate and the unprecedented growth of China will so erode the foundations of capital accumulationby pushing wages and environmental costs up, for examplethat the entire capitalist system will be shaken to its core. This is essential reading for those who still believe that there is no alternative.
Main Description
View the Table of Contents. Read the Introduction.Zuckerman has given a clear and informative account of the ways in which the occupation of Belgium had a significance transcending the borders of one small European country. That is a major achievement.--H-Net Book ReviewZuckerman has mined Belgium's archives to depict a German occupation that presaged the Nazi era. He illustrates how the falsity of the most lurid atrocity accounts rendered public opinion dubious or indifferent to the real rape of Belgium, and thus allowed Germany to escape accountability for its crimes.--CHOICELarry Zuckerman's vividly written and argumentative study engages with many aspects of Belgian History.--The Times LiteraryA welcome addition to the literature, this is recommended for all history collections.-- Library JournalA fresh and fascinating examination of the German occupation of Belgium during World War I and its historical consequences. A well-written and thoroughly documented study.--Salem PressIn August 1914, the German Army invaded the neutral nation of Belgium, violating a treaty that the German chancellor dismissed as a scrap of paper. The invaders terrorized the Belgians, shooting thousands of civilians and looting and burning scores of towns, including Louvain, which housed the country's preeminent university.The Rape of Belgium recalls the bloodshed and destruction of the 1914 invasion, and the outrage it inspired abroad. Yet Larry Zuckerman does not stop there, and takes us on a harrowing journey over the next fifty months, vividly documenting Germany's occupation of Belgium. The occupiers plundered the country, looting its rich supply of natural resources; deporting Belgians en masse to Germany and northern France as forced laborers; and jailing thousands on contrived charges, including the failure to inform on family or neighbors. Despite the duration of the siege and the destruction left in its wake, in considering Belgium, neither the Allies nor the history books focused on the occupation, and instead cast their attention almost wholly on the invasion.Now, The Rape of Belgium draws on a little-known story to remind us of the horrors of war. Further, Zuckerman shows why the Allies refrained from punishing the Germans for the occupation and controversially suggests that had the victors followed through, Europe's reaction to the rise of Nazi Germany might have taken a very different course.
Main Description
In August 1914, the German Army invaded the neutral nation of Belgium, violating a treaty that the German chancellor dismissed as a "scrap of paper." The invaders terrorized the Belgians, shooting thousands of civilians and looting and burning scores of towns, including Louvain, which housed the country's preeminent university. The Rape of Belgiumrecalls the bloodshed and destruction of the 1914 invasion, and the outrage it inspired abroad. Yet Larry Zuckerman does not stop there, and takes us on a harrowing journey over the next fifty months, vividly documenting Germany's occupation of Belgium. The occupiers plundered the country, looting its rich supply of natural resources; deporting Belgians en masse to Germany and northern France as forced laborers; and jailing thousands on contrived charges, including the failure to inform on family or neighbors. Despite the duration of the siege and the destruction left in its wake, in considering Belgium, neither the Allies nor the history books focused on the occupation, and instead cast their attention almost wholly on the invasion. Now, The Rape of Belgiumdraws on a little-known story to remind us of the horrors of war. Further, Zuckerman shows why the Allies refrained from punishing the Germans for the occupation and controversially suggests that had the victors followed through, Europe's reaction to the rise of Nazi Germany might have taken a very different course.
Short Annotation
In August 1914, the German Army invaded the neutral nation of Belgium, violating a treaty that the German chancellor dismissed as a "scrap of paper."
Unpaid Annotation
A fascinating chronicle of Germany's crushing invasion--involving looting, destruction, and execution--and the 50-month long occupation of a peaceful nation.
Main Description
In August 1914, the German Army invaded the neutral nation of Belgium, violating a treaty that the German chancellor dismissed as a "scrap of paper." The invaders terrorized the Belgians, shooting thousands of civilians and looting and burning scores of towns, including Louvain, which housed the country's preeminent university.The Rape of Belgiumrecalls the bloodshed and destruction of the 1914 invasion, and the outrage it inspired abroad. Yet Larry Zuckerman does not stop there, and takes us on a harrowing journey over the next fifty months, vividly documenting Germany's occupation of Belgium. The occupiers plundered the country, looting its rich supply of natural resources; deporting Belgians en masse to Germany and northern France as forced laborers; and jailing thousands on contrived charges, including the failure to inform on family or neighbors. Despite the duration of the siege and the destruction left in its wake, in considering Belgium, neither the Allies nor the history books focused on the occupation, and instead cast their attention almost wholly on the invasion.Now,The Rape of Belgiumdraws on a little-known story to remind us of the horrors of war. Further, Zuckerman shows why the Allies refrained from punishing the Germans for the occupation and controversially suggests that had the victors followed through, Europe's reaction to the rise of Nazi Germany might have taken a very different course.
Unpaid Annotation
View the Table of Contents . Read the Introduction .<
Unpaid Annotation
View the Table of Contents . Read the Introduction . "Zuckerman has mined Belgium's archives to depict a German occupation that presaged the Nazi era. He illustrates how the falsity of the most lurid atrocity accounts rendered public opinion dubious or indifferent to the real "rape of Belgium," and thus allowed Germany to escape accountability for its crimes."-CHOICE"Larry Zuckerman's vividly written and argumentative study engages with many aspects of Belgian History." -The Times Literary"A welcome addition to the literature, this is recommended for all history collections." - Library Journal "A fresh and fascinating examination of the German occupation of Belgium during World War I and its historical consequences. A well-written and thoroughly documented study." -Salem PressIn August 1914, the German Army invaded the neutral nation of Belgium, violating a treaty that the German chancellor dismissed as a "scrap of paper." The invaders terrorized the Belgians, shooting thousands of civilians and looting and burning scores of towns, including Louvain, which housed the country's preeminent university. The Rape of Belgium recalls the bloodshed and destruction of the 1914 invasion, and the outrage it inspired abroad. Yet Larry Zuckerman does not stop there, and takes us on a harrowing journey over the next fifty months, vividly documenting Germany's occupation of Belgium. The occupiers plundered the country, looting its rich supply of natural resources; deporting Belgians en masse to Germany and northern France as forced laborers; and jailing thousands on contrived charges, including the failure to inform on family or neighbors. Despite the duration of the siege and the destruction left in its wake, in considering Belgium, neither the Allies nor the history books focused on the occupation, and instead cast their attention almost wholly on the invasion. Featuring extensive archival research, including previously untapped Belgian government archives, The Rape of Belgium draws on a little-known story to remind us about the horrors of war. Further, Zuckerman shows why the Allies refrained from punishing the Germans for the occupation and controversially suggests that had the victors followed through, European history might have taken a very different course over the next several decades.
Main Description
View the Table of Contents . Read the Introduction . "Zuckerman has given a clear and informative account of the ways in which the occupation of Belgium had a significance transcending the borders of one small European country. That is a major achievement." --H-Net Book Review"Zuckerman has mined Belgium's archives to depict a German occupation that presaged the Nazi era. He illustrates how the falsity of the most lurid atrocity accounts rendered public opinion dubious or indifferent to the real "rape of Belgium," and thus allowed Germany to escape accountability for its crimes."--CHOICE"Larry Zuckerman's vividly written and argumentative study engages with many aspects of Belgian History." --The Times Literary"A welcome addition to the literature, this is recommended for all history collections." --Library Journal "A fresh and fascinating examination of the German occupation of Belgium during World War I and its historical consequences. A well-written and thoroughly documented study." --Salem PressIn August 1914, the German Army invaded the neutral nation of Belgium, violating a treaty that the German chancellor dismissed as a "scrap of paper." The invaders terrorized the Belgians, shooting thousands of civilians and looting and burning scores of towns, including Louvain, which housed the country's preeminent university. The Rape of Belgiumrecalls the bloodshed and destruction of the 1914 invasion, and the outrage it inspired abroad. Yet Larry Zuckerman does not stop there, and takes us on a harrowing journey over the next fifty months, vividly documenting Germany's occupation of Belgium. The occupiers plundered the country, looting its rich supply of natural resources; deporting Belgians en masse to Germany and northern France as forced laborers; and jailing thousands on contrived charges, including the failure to inform on family or neighbors. Despite the duration of the siege and the destruction left in its wake, in considering Belgium, neither the Allies nor the history books focused on the occupation, and instead cast their attention almost wholly on the invasion. Now,The Rape of Belgiumdraws on a little-known story to remind us of the horrors of war. Further, Zuckerman shows why the Allies refrained from punishing the Germans for the occupation and controversially suggests that had the victors followed through, Europe's reaction to the rise of Nazi Germany might have taken a very different course.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Note on Geographyp. xi
Introductionp. 1
Your Neighbor's Roofp. 5
Marching through Hellp. 22
The Ghost of 1870p. 38
Belgium Does Not Ask for Pityp. 62
A Vague and Misty Unrealityp. 78
This Poisoned Atmospherep. 103
At Least They Only Drown Your Womenp. 120
Hell's Premisesp. 142
Taking Note of These Thingsp. 165
Mort pour la Patriep. 183
Like a Thief in the Nightp. 200
It Is Impossible That We Will Be Abandonedp. 218
A Triflep. 242
A Popular Delusionp. 259
Notesp. 277
Bibliographyp. 321
Indexp. 329
About the Authorp. 339
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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