Catalogue


Aristotle's "De anima" [= Sefer ha-nefesh le-Arisṭo] /
translated into Hebrew by Zerahyah ben Isaac ben Shealtiel Hen ; a critical edition with an introd. and index by Gerrit Bos.
imprint
Leiden ; New York : E.J. Brill, 1994.
description
viii, 198 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
9004099379 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
uniform title
imprint
Leiden ; New York : E.J. Brill, 1994.
isbn
9004099379 (alk. paper)
general note
Running title: Sefer ha-nefesh = De anima.
catalogue key
509604
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [194]-195) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
' In this, the sixth volume of the series Aristoteles Semitico-Latinus, Gerrit Bos has made available a fine edition of a Hebrew version of the foundation text of medieval psychology. Bos, a promising young linguist, has published an accurate text and adorned it with copious philological apparatuses.'Y. Tzvi Langermann, The Jewish Quarterly Review, 1997.
'"In this, the sixth volume of the series Aristoteles Semitico-Latinus, Gerrit Bos has made available a fine edition of a Hebrew version of the foundation text of medieval psychology. Bos, a promising young linguist, has published an accurate text and adorned it with copious philological apparatuses.' Y. Tzvi Langermann, "The Jewish Quarterly Review, 1997.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The Oxford Classical texts, of Scriptorum Classicorum Bibliotheca Oxeniensis, are renowned for their reliability and presentation. The series consists of a text without commentary but with a brief apparatus critics at the foot of each page. There are now over 100 volumes, representing the greater part of classical Greek and Latin literature.
Main Description
This edition of Zerah yahs Hebrew translation of De Anima, Aristotles monograph on the soul, is of major importance for the history of transmission of Aristotles text in the Middle Ages. De Anima, commented upon by Greek philosophers such as Alexander of Aphrodisias and Themistius and Arab philosophers such as Avicenna and Averroes, was a major source of inspiration for medieval Arab and Jewish philosophers.The Hebrew translations of Averroes commentaries, prepared from 1189 on, were very influential in Jewish intellectual circles. One of the translators involved in this activity was Zerah yah ben Isaac ben Shealtiel h en, who also translated Aristotles De Anima. This translation is extremely important since it is based on the same lost Arabic translation as Averroes long commentary.The solution which Zerah yahs translation provides for the question of the authorship of this lost Arabic translation thus also holds good for Averroes text.
Unpaid Annotation
This edition of Zera'yah's Hebrew translation of "De Anima, Aristotle's monograph on the soul, is of major importance for the history of transmission of Aristotle's text in the Middle Ages. "De Anima, commented upon by Greek philosophers such as Alexander of Aphrodisias and Themistius and Arab philosophers such as Avicenna and Averroes, was a major source of inspiration for medieval Arab and Jewish philosophers.The Hebrew translations of Averroes' commentaries, prepared from 1189 on, were very influential in Jewish intellectual circles. One of the translators involved in this activity was Zera'yah ben Isaac ben Shealtiel ?en, who also translated Aristotle's "De Anima. This translation is extremely important since it is based on the same lost Arabic translation as Averroes' long commentary.The solution which Zera'yah's translation provides for the question of the authorship of this lost Arabic translation thus also holds good for Averroes' text.
Main Description
Aristotle's De Anima has a claim to be the first systematic treatment of issues in the philosophy of mind, and also to be one of the greatest works on the subject. This volume provides an accurate translation of Books II and III, together with some terms, to help the student of philosophy whodoes not know Greek. Since the original publication of this volume, Aristotle's philosophy of mind has been the focus of lively scholarly debate; for this revised edition, Christopher Shields had added a substantial review of this recent work, together with a new bibliography.
Long Description
This edition of Zera'yah's Hebrew translation of De Anima, Aristotle's monograph on the soul, is of major importance for the history of transmission of Aristotle's text in the Middle Ages. De Anima, commented upon by Greek philosophers such as Alexander of Aphrodisias and Themistius and Arab philosophers such as Avicenna and Averroes, was a major source of inspiration for medieval Arab and Jewish philosophers.The Hebrew translations of Averroes' commentaries, prepared from 1189 on, were very influential in Jewish intellectual circles. One of the translators involved in this activity was Zera'yah ben Isaac ben Shealtiel ?en, who also translated Aristotle's De Anima. This translation is extremely important since it is based on the same lost Arabic translation as Averroes' long commentary.The solution which Zera'yah's translation provides for the question of the authorship of this lost Arabic translation thus also holds good for Averroes' text.
Long Description
This edition of Zera'yah's Hebrew translation of "De Anima, Aristotle's monograph on the soul, is of major importance for the history of transmission of Aristotle's text in the Middle Ages. "De Anima, commented upon by Greek philosophers such as Alexander of Aphrodisias and Themistius and Arab philosophers such as Avicenna and Averroes, was a major source of inspiration for medieval Arab and Jewish philosophers. The Hebrew translations of Averroes' commentaries, prepared from 1189 on, were very influential in Jewish intellectual circles. One of the translators involved in this activity was Zera'yah ben Isaac ben Shealtiel ?en, who also translated Aristotle's "De Anima. This translation is extremely important since it is based on the same lost Arabic translation as Averroes' long commentary. The solution which Zera'yah's translation provides for the question of the authorship of this lost Arabic translation thus also holds good for Averroes' text.
Back Cover Copy
This edition of Zerahyah's Hebrew translation of De Anima, Aristotle's monograph on the soul, is of major importance for the history of transmission of Aristotle's text in the Middle Ages. De Anima, commented upon by Greek philosophers such as Alexander of Aphrodisias and Themistius and Arab philosophers such as Avicenna and Averroes, was a major source of inspiration for medieval Arab and Jewish philosophers. The Hebrew translations of Averroes' commentaries, prepared from 1189 on, were very influential in Jewish intellectual circles. One of the translators involved in this activity was Zerahyah ben Isaac ben Shealtiel Hen, who also translated Aristotle's De Anima. This translation is extremely important since it is based on the same lost Arabic translation as Averroes' long commentary. The solution which Zerahyah's translation provides for the question of the authorship of this lost Arabic translation thus also holds good for Averroes' text. Mediaeval philosophy, theology and science, both in Europe and the Middle East, have been profoundly influenced by Aristotle, who for the benefit of mediaeval scholars was translated into Syriac, Arabic, Hebrew and Latin. Knowledge of these translations is essential for the understanding and interpretation of the mediaeval European and Middle Eastern philosophers, theologians and scientists. The almost complete lack of reliable editions of these translations prompted the creation, within the Corpus Philosophorum Medii AEvi project of the Union Academique Internationale, of two collections: the Aristoteles Latinus, concerned with the Latin translations of Aristotle's works made directly from the Greek, and still in progress, and the AristotelesSemitico-Latinus, inaugurated by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences and concerned with the Syriac, Arabic and Hebrew translations as well as the Latin translations made of these. The Aristoteles Semitico-Latinus not only includes editions of the translations proper, but also presents editions of contemporary paraphrases and commentaries as well as studies. The text editions are accompanied by an introduction, glossaries and notes. Editions of texts of Aristotle's works not yet available in a translation in one of the modern languages are accompanied by a translation in English or German.
Table of Contents
Preface
The Translatorp. 1
The Manuscripts of the Hebrew Translationp. 5
Introduction to the Editionp. 7
The Arabic Source of the Hebrew Translationp. 9
Characteristic joint readings by Zerahyah and Averroes, as compared with the Greek Text of the De Anima and Badawip. 13
Comparison between Zerahyah, Averroes and Avicennap. 20
Zerahyah's Technique of Translationp. 23
The Hebrew Textp. 44
Sigla and Abbreviationsp. 44
Book Ip. 45
Book IIp. 72
Book IIIp. 109
Indexp. 141
Bibliographyp. 194
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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