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Romanticism, hermeneutics, and the crisis of the human sciences /
Scott Masson.
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, 2004.
description
x, 241 p.
ISBN
0754635031 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, 2004.
isbn
0754635031 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5091172
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Dr. Scott Masson is Assistant Professor of English Literature at Tyndale University College, Toronto, Canada.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Why is there something rather than nothing? On the surface this seems a simple question but in reality it has taxed philosophers since the time of the ancient Greeks. The author explores the consequences of adopting the scientific method and the concept of universal knowledge in the age of Enlightenment.
Long Description
The human sciences established and developed in the nineteenth century have slowly disintegrated. It is an ironic end. It was in the name of the greater legitimacy of more universal psychological criteria that its architects disavowed the traditional theological standard for valuing and evaluating human words and deeds. With hindsight, we can see that universality was indeed gained, but only at the cost of alienating any sense of common legitimacy.Harold Bloom, defending the canon largely in the humanising, 'moral sense' convention of critics operating since Matthew Arnold, has resolutely maintained the common legitimacy of aesthetic value against the claims of particular interest groups. But the very universality attached to aesthetic value is at odds with the world of common sense, and thus lies at the root of the problem. To complicate matters, this universality has been understood as a traditional criterion.A more radical treatment of the subject is needed. This study begins by surveying the field of modern hermeneutics. Noting its repeated crises of self-legitimisation, it traces these to circular beliefs bequeathed by Romanticism that human nature is self-begetting, and can thus be known intimately and autonomously.After providing a historical overview of how human nature had been understood, the focus shifts to the attack in Coleridge's Biographia Literaria on Wordsworth's 1802 Preface to Lyrical Ballads, and to a reading of some key Romantic texts. It reads Coleridge's famous definition of the imagination as an attack on Romantic hermeneutics, rooted in the traditional view that man has been created in Imago Dei.
Main Description
This study questions the Romantics' belief that the imaginative poetry of feeling could overcome the alienating effects of Cartesian rationalism, and reform civilisation by wedding the mind to this goodly universe. It begins by surveying modern hermeneutics, which attempted to develop a science of interpretation compatible with Romantic tenets. Underlying these was the belief that human nature itself could be known intimately and developed autonomously. Observing the repeated crises of self-legitimisation that thence ensued, it enquires into the purposes of the humanities.After examining how human nature had been understood in the Western tradition until the Enlightenment, the focus shifts to the attack in Coleridge's Biographia Literaria on Wordsworth's 1802 Preface to Lyrical Ballads, and to a reading of some key Romantic texts. It reads Coleridge's famous definition of the imagination as an attack on Romantic hermeneutics, rooted in the traditional view that man has been created in Imago Dei.
Unpaid Annotation
This study questions the Romantics' belief that the imaginative poetry of feeling could overcome the alienating effects of Cartesian rationalism and reform civilization by wedding the mind to this goodly universe.
Table of Contents
General Editors' Prefacep. vii
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Introduction - Two Worlds' Wordsp. 1
Modern Hermeneutics: The Development of Universal Relativity by Understanding Meaning in Terms of Truthp. 23
Hannah Arendt's Study of the Human Conditionp. 59
Wordsworth's Understanding of Nature in the 'Preface to Lyrical Ballads' (1802) and the Hermeneutic Significance of Feelingp. 87
Shelley's Organic Theology in Mont Blancp. 139
Keats's Eternal Urnp. 181
Conclusionp. 217
Bibliographyp. 223
Indexp. 235
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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