Catalogue

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Gender and voice in the French novel, 1730-1782 /
Aurora Wolfgang.
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT, USA : Ashgate, 2004.
description
ix, 209 p.
ISBN
0754637026 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT, USA : Ashgate, 2004.
isbn
0754637026 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5090929
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Aurora Wolfgang is Professor of French and Director of Women's Studies, California State University, San Bernardino, USA
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2005
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this study of how style constructs gender in the 18th-century novel, the author analyzes four works of fiction that highlight the relationship of womanliness to writing in the literary landscape of 18th-century France.
Long Description
Analyzing four best-selling novels - by both women and men - written in the feminine voice, this book traces how the creation of women-centered salons and the emergence of a feminine poetic style engendered a new type of literature in eighteenth-century France. The author argues that writing in a female voice allowed writers of both sexes to break with classical notions of literature and style, so that they could create a modern sensibility that appealed to a larger reading public, and gave them scope to innovate with style and form.Wolfgang brings to light how the 'female voice' in literature came to embody the language of sociability, but also allowed writers to explore the domain of inter-subjectivity, while creating new bonds between writers and the reading public. Through examination of Marivaux's La Vie de Marianne, Graffigny's Lettres d'une PĂ©ruvienne, Riccoboni's Lettres de Mistriss Fanni Butlerd, and Laclos's Les Liaisons dangereuses, she shows that in France, this modern 'feminine' sensibility turned the least prestigious of literary genres - the novel - into the most compelling and innovative literary form of the eighteenth century.Emphasizing how the narratives analyzed here refashioned the French literary world through their linguistic innovation and expression of new forms of subjectivity, this study claims an important role for feminine-voice narratives in shaping the field of eighteenth-century literature.
Main Description
Analyzing four best-selling novels-by both women and men-written in the feminine voice, this book traces how the creation of women-centered salons and the emergence of a feminine poetic style engendered a new type of literature in eighteenth-century France. The author argues that writing in a female voice allowed writers of both sexes to break with classical notions of literature and style so that they could create a modern sensibility that appealed to a larger reading public, and gave them scope to innovate with style and form.Through examination of Marivaux's La Vie de Marianne, Graffigny's Lettres d'une PĂ©ruvienne, Riccoboni's Lettres de Mistriss Fanni Butlerd, and Laclos's Les Liaisons dangereuses, she shows that in France, this modern feminine sensibility turned the least prestigious of literary genres-the novel-into the most compelling and innovative literary form of the eighteenth century.
Unpaid Annotation
Analyzing four best-selling novels by both women and men written in the feminine voice, this book traces how the creation of women-centered salons and the emergence of a feminine poetic style engendered a new type of literature in eighteenth-century France. The author argues that writing in a female voice allowed writers of both sexes to break with classical notions of literature and style, so that they could create a modern sensibility that appealed to a larger reading public and gave them scope to innovate with style and form.
Unpaid Annotation
Analyzing four best-selling novels by both women and men, written in the feminine voice, this book traces how the creation of women-centered salons and the emergence of a feminine poetic style engendered a new type of literature in eighteenth-century France. The author argues that writing in a female voice allowed writers of both sexes to break with classical notions of literature and style so that they could create a modern sensibility that appealed to a larger reading public, and gave them scope to innovate with style and form.
Unpaid Annotation
Analyzing four best-selling novels - by both women and men - written in the feminine voice, this book traces how the creation of women-centered salons and the emergence of a feminine poetic style engendered a new type of literature in eighteenth-century France. The author argues that writing in a female voice allowed writers of both sexes to break with classical notions of literature and style, so that they could create a modern sensibility that appealed to a larger reading public, and gave them scope to innovate with style and form.Wolfgang brings to light how the "female voice" in literature came to embody the language of sociability, but also allowed writers to explore the domain of inter-subjectivity, while creating new bonds between writers and the reading public. Through examination of Marivaux's La Vie de Marianne, Graffigny's Lettres d'une Pruvienne, Riccoboni's Lettres de Mistriss Fanni Bulerd, and Laclos's Les Liaisons Dangereuses, she shows that in France, this modern "feminine" sensibility turned the least prestigious of literary genres - the novel - into the most compelling and innovative literary form of the eighteenth century. Emphasizing how the narratives analyzed here refashioned the French literary world through their linguistic innovation and expression of new forms of subjectivity, this study claims an important role for feminine-voice narratives in shaping the field of eighteenth-century literature.
Table of Contents
List of Tablesp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Write for Success: Feminine-Voice Narratives in the Literary Fieldp. 17
The Novelist turned 'Furiously Female': Marivaux's La Vie de Mariannep. 67
Words and Worlds of Difference: Graffigny's Lettres d'une Peruviennep. 97
The Discourse of Authenticity in Riccoboni's Lettres de Mistriss Fanni Butlerdp. 131
Embodying the Female Voice: Laclos's Les Liaisons dangereusesp. 157
Epiloguep. 187
Bibliographyp. 191
Indexp. 205
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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