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North American linkages : opportunities and challenges for Canada /
general editor: Richard G. Harris.
imprint
Calgary : University of Calgary Press, c2003.
description
693 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1552381064
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Calgary : University of Calgary Press, c2003.
isbn
1552381064
general note
Issued also in French under title: Les liens en Amérique du Nord.
catalogue key
5089983
 
Co-published by Industry Canada.
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Richard G. Harris is the Telus Professor of Economics at Simon Fraser University Ram Acharya is an economist with the Micro-Economic Policy Analysis Branch at Industry Canada Sven D. Arndt is the C.M. Stone Professor of Money, Credit and Trade and the Director of the Lowe Institute of Political Economy at Claremont College in California Keith G. Banting is Director of the School of Policy Studies at Queen's University in Kingston Paul Beaudry is a Professor of economics and the Canada Research Chair at the University of British Columbia Eugene Beaulieu is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Calgary Gerard W. Boychuk is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Waterloo Drusilla K. Brown is an Associate Professor of economics at Tufts University Kirk A. Collins is a part-time Professor of economics at the University of Ottawa Bev Dahlby is a Professor of economics at the University of Alberta and a Fellow of the Institute for Public Economics Jim Davies is a Professor of economics and the RBC Financial Group Fellow (EPRI) at the University of Western Ontario Alan V. Deardorff is the John W. Sweetland Professor of International Economics and a Professor of economics and public policy at the University of Michigan James D. Gaisford is a Professor of economics at the University of Calgary Steven Globerman is currently Ross Distinguished Professor of Canada-U.S. Business and Economic Relations and Director of the Centre for International Business at Western Washington University David Green is an Associate Professor of economics at the University of British Columbia Richard G. Harris is the Telus Professor of Economics at Simon Fraser University Michael Hart is a Professor of international affairs at the Norman Patterson School of International Affairs at Carleton University Keith Head is an Associate Professor in Asian commerce strategy at the Faculty of Commerce, University of British Columbia Catherine L. Mann has been a Senior Fellow at the Institute for International Economics since 1997
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Globalisation continues to link the economies of all three North American partners into the world economy. At the same time, Canada's trade linkages with the US and Mexico are growing rapidly and continue to evolve, creating new opportunities and some unique challenges. The overall policy challenge for Canada is how to better manage challenges and maximise opportunities presented by the growing North American linkages. Over thirty internationally renowned experts contribute to this in-depth volume on important policy issues of deepening North American linkages.
Main Description
Globalisation continues to link the economies of all three North American partners into the world economy. At the same time, Canada's trade linkages with the US & Mexico are growing rapidly & continue to evolve, creating new opportunities & some unique challenges. The overall policy challenge for Canada is how to better manage challenges & maximise opportunities presented by the growing North American linkages. Over thirty internationally renowned experts contribute to this in-depth volume on important policy issues of deepening North American linkages.
Main Description
Globalization continues to link the economies of all three North American partners into the world economy. At the same time, Canada's trade linkages with the U.S. and Mexico are growing rapidly and continue to evolve, creating new opportunities and some unique challenges. The overall policy challenge for Canada is how to better manage challenges and maximize opportunities presented by the growing North American linkages. Over thirty internationally renowned experts contribute to this in-depth volume on important policy issues of deepening North American linkages.
Main Description
Globalization continues to link the economies of all three North American partners into the world economy. At the same time, Canada's trade linkages with the U.S. and Mexico are growing rapidly and continue to evolve, creating new opportunities and some unique challenges. The overall policy challenge for Canada is how to better manage challenges and maximize opportunities presented by the growing North American linkages.Over thirty internationally renowned experts contribute to this in-depth volume on important policy issues of deepening North American linkages.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xvi
Introductionp. 1
Measuring Integration: Trade and Investmentp. 2
The NAFTA Countries as a Common Marketp. 5
Policy Convergence or Divergence?p. 7
Conclusionp. 10
Measuring Integration: Trade and Investment
Canada-U.S. Trade and Foreign Direct Investment Patternsp. 13
Introductionp. 13
Merchandise Trade Patternsp. 15
The Service Trade and Foreign Direct Investment Patternsp. 31
Factor Content and RCAp. 40
Intraindustry Trade and Productivityp. 52
Canada's Competitive Position in the U.S. Marketp. 56
Conclusionsp. 61
Endnotesp. 65
Bibliographyp. 68
Appendix Ap. 70
Appendix Bp. 79
Appendix Cp. 83
Appendix Dp. 84
Appendix Ep. 87
Comparative Advantage and Trade in North America: A Sectoral Analysisp. 89
Introductionp. 89
North American Trade in Manufactured Goods: An Overviewp. 91
Theoryp. 97
Empirical Implementationp. 99
The Datap. 100
Regression Resultsp. 103
Concluding Remarksp. 107
Endnotesp. 108
Acknowledgmentsp. 109
Bibliographyp. 109
Appendix Ap. 110
Appendix Bp. 112
Appendix Cp. 113
Appendix Dp. 115
Mexico and Canada: Changing Specializations in Trade with the United Statesp. 117
Introductionp. 117
Some Interesting Factsp. 118
Factors Driving Exports from Mexico and Canada: The Contribution of Rising U.S. Import Demandp. 135
Additional Factors behind Rising Exports from Mexico and Canadap. 149
Some Issuesp. 164
The Research in Briefp. 174
Concluding Thoughtsp. 177
Endnotesp. 177
Bibliographyp. 179
Free Trade and Canadian Economic Performance: Which Theories Does the Evidence Support?p. 181
Introductionp. 181
Trade Creation and Diversionp. 182
Interindustry Resource Reallocationp. 192
Efficiency Gains within Industriesp. 196
Conclusionp. 203
Bibliographyp. 204
Comment on: Free Trade and Canadian Economic Performance: Which Theories Does the Evidence Support?p. 207
Cities, Regions and Economic Integration in North Americap. 211
Introductionp. 211
The Importance of Citiesp. 211
Features of Economic Integration: The Context in which Our Cities and Regions Operatep. 213
Agglomeration of Economic Activity, Metropolization and Economic Growthp. 216
Competitiveness and Growth in a Sample of North American Citiesp. 226
Concluding Commentsp. 246
Endnotesp. 247
Bibliographyp. 249
Appendix Ap. 251
Canada-U.S. Integration and Labour Market Outcomes: A Perspective Within the General Context of Globalizationp. 253
Introductionp. 253
Capital Flows and Capital Market Outcomes: A Simple Theoretical Frameworkp. 254
The Effect of Physical Capital Accumulation on Wage Structure: International Evidencep. 258
Discussion of the Role of U.S.-Canada Integration in Increasing Capital Flows to Canadap. 274
Conclusionp. 277
Endnotesp. 278
Bibliographyp. 279
Assessing Recent Patterns of Foreign Direct Investment in Canada and the United Statesp. 281
Introductionp. 281
Aggregate FDI Flowsp. 283
FDI Flows, by Country of Origin and Industrial Sectorp. 291
Evaluating Hypotheses about Canada's Declining Location Attractivenessp. 300
Overall Summary and Policy Conclusionsp. 305
Endnotesp. 307
Acknowledgmentsp. 309
Bibliographyp. 309
The Nafta Countries as a Common Market
The Consequences of Increased Labour Mobility Within an Integrating North Americap. 313
Introductionp. 313
Historical and Recent Trends in Migrationp. 316
Trade and Migration: Traditional Theories and Implicationsp. 319
Agglomeration, Convergence and Regional Developmentp. 332
The Brain Drain and Knowledge Transfersp. 335
New Forms of Labour Mobilityp. 339
Mobility and Adjustmentp. 345
Conclusion: Policy and Research Implicationsp. 348
Endnotesp. 350
Acknowledgmentsp. 352
Bibliographyp. 352
Comment on: The Consequences of Increased Labour Mobility Within an Integrating North Americap. 355
Impacts on Nafta Members of Multilateral and Regional Trading Arrangements and Tarrif Harmonizationp. 359
Introductionp. 359
The Prospective Doha Roundp. 360
Regional Negotiating Optionsp. 371
Bilateral Negotiating Optionsp. 376
Harmonization of the NAFTA's External Tariffsp. 383
Conclusions and the Implications for Policyp. 387
Endnotesp. 388
Bibliographyp. 389
The Pros and Cons of North American Monetary Integrationp. 391
Introductionp. 391
Traditional Argumentsp. 392
Volatility and Misalignmentp. 397
Exchange Rates and Economic Structurep. 401
Determining the Direction of Causalityp. 410
Choosing the Proper Form of Monetary Cooperationp. 413
The Politics of Monetary Unionp. 414
Conclusionp. 415
Bibliographyp. 416
Canada, the United States, and Deepening Economic Integration: Next Stepsp. 419
Introductionp. 419
The Impact of Freer Tradep. 421
The Impact of September 11p. 424
The Extent of Remaining Trade and Investment Barriersp. 426
A Comprehensive Bilateral Initiativep. 430
Security, Enforcement, and a More Open Borderp. 433
Broader Implicationsp. 435
The Confidence Factorp. 437
Bilateral or Trilateral Approaches?p. 438
Concluding Observationsp. 440
Endnotesp. 442
Bibliographyp. 445
Policy Convergence or Divergence?
Tax Treatment of Human Capital in Canada and the United States: An Overview and Examination of the Case of University Graduatesp. 449
Introductionp. 449
Conceptual Frameworkp. 450
A Comparison of Tax Features in Canada and the United Statesp. 455
Estimating Effective Tax Rates on First Degree University Studies Using Survey Datap. 470
Implications for North American Economic Integration and Policyp. 477
Conclusionp. 479
Endnotesp. 481
Bibliographyp. 484
Economic Integration: Implications for Business Taxationp. 487
Introductionp. 487
International Trends in Corporate Taxation: Is There a Race to the Bottom?p. 488
International Tax Competitionp. 494
The Impact of International Taxation on Business Decisionsp. 509
North American Integration and Formula Apportionmentp. 523
Endnotesp. 527
Acknowledgmentsp. 529
Bibliographyp. 529
The Paradox of Convergence: National Versus Subnational Patterns of Convergence in Canadian and U.S. Income Maintenance Policyp. 533
Introductionp. 533
Retirement Income Policyp. 539
Unemployment Insurancep. 543
Social Assistance and Family Benefitsp. 548
Workers' Compensationp. 555
Summary and Conclusionsp. 559
Endnotesp. 561
Bibliographyp. 562
Appendix Ap. 565
Appendix Bp. 567
Appendix Cp. 571
Comment on: The Paradox of Convergence: National Versus Subnational Patterns of Convergence in Canadian and U.S. Income Maintenance Policyp. 573
North American Integration and the Environmentp. 575
Introductionp. 575
Optimal Levels of Environmental Qualityp. 577
Environmental Quality Trends in North Americap. 582
Hypotheses on the Links between Integration and the Environmentp. 597
Policy Implications for Canadap. 618
Endnotesp. 621
Bibliographyp. 625
Comment on: North American Integration and the Environmentp. 629
Competition Policy and Intellectual Property: Issues of Canadian and American Integrationp. 631
Background: The Importance of Competition Policy in Promoting Innovation and Economic Growthp. 631
Multijurisdictional Issues in Competition Policyp. 635
International Efforts to Create a Global Competition Agencyp. 644
Intellectual Property Issuesp. 647
Conclusionp. 650
Endnotesp. 650
Bibliographyp. 651
Can the Nafta Partners Forge a Global Approach to Internet Governance?p. 653
Introductionp. 653
The Potential Benefits of the Internetp. 655
A NAFTA Approach Already in Place for International Trade and Intellectual Propertyp. 657
A NAFTA Approach in the Making: Business Conduct, Taxation and Privacyp. 659
Conclusion: A NAFTA Approach or a Global Model?p. 673
Endnotesp. 675
Bibliographyp. 677
Comment on: Can the Nafta Partners Forge a Global Approach to Internet Governance?p. 681
About the Contributorsp. 685
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