Catalogue


Britain and the American South : from colonialism to rock and roll /
essays by Franklin T. Lambert ... [et al.] ; edited by Joseph P. Ward.
imprint
Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, 2003.
description
xiii, 281 p. : ill.
ISBN
1578065801 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, 2003.
isbn
1578065801 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Foreword : empire building and empire wrecking / Joseph P. Ward -- Virginia's religious revolution : from established monopoly to free marketplace / Franklin T. Lambert -- Power and authority in the colonial South : the English legacy and its contradictions / Holly Brewer -- "Like a stone wall never to be broke" : the British-Indian boundary line with the Creek Indians, 1763-1773 / Kathryn E. Holland Braund -- Carolinians abroad : cultivating English identities from the colonial lower South / S. Max Edelson -- The American South and English print satire, 1760-1865 / Marcus Wood -- British views of the confederacy / R.J.M. Blackett : the South and the British left, 1930-1960 / Hugh Wilford -- "By Elvis and all the saints" : images of the American South in the world of 1950s British popular music / Brian Ward -- Afterword : on the irrelevance of knights / Michael O'Brien.
general note
Series title from dust jacket.
catalogue key
5088608
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Essays that trace the long inter-relationship between Britain and the American South in music, religion, and trade
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-07-01:
This collection of eight essays, plus a foreword and an afterword, originated in a conference at the University of Mississippi. Four essays and part of a fifth focus on the Colonial period, while the remaining ones address later years. All the contributors are solid scholars. Their topics are varied: the beginnings of religious pluralism, a transatlantic debate over power and authority, a Creek boundary line, Colonial elites cultivating English identities, the South in English print satire, British views of the Confederacy, British leftist views of the South in the mid-1900s, and the South's influence on British popular music in the 1950s. The awkward question that Michael O'Brien raises in the afterword is whether these well-crafted essays belong in a common volume. He challenges the assumption that the South or Britain had a self-evident meaning: "Both the South and Britain have been moving targets, not fixed points, each a mix of cultures much in flux." Before the 19th century, "there was no 'South' ... in any meaningful sense." Despite the merit of the individual essays, the title promises too much. ^BSumming Up: Optional. Graduate students and faculty. D. M. Fahey Miami University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2004
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Summaries
Main Description
In "Britain and the American South: From Colonialism to Rock and Roll, historians analyze central aspects of the cultural exchanges between Britain and the American South. Along with the Spanish and the French, the British were among the first Europeans to have contact with the native peoples in what would come to be known as the American South. During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the British were intensively engaged in colonizing much of the religion and developing its economy. The American Revolution severed the governmental links between Britain and its Southern colonies, but economic, social, religious, and cultural ties persevered during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. "Britain and the American South: From Colonialism to Rock and Roll illuminates Britain's evolving relationship with the South over a period of four centuries, an era that witnessed Britain's rise to imperial dominance and then the gradual erosion of its influence on the wider world. It considers the British influence,upon--and often critical responses to--Southern institutions and cultural formations such as religion, gentility, slavery, and music. Two chapters focus on Britain's response to the Confederacy, while other essays look even further into the past, concentrating on the English legacy in colonial times, its influence on Southern religion, and Britain's relationship with the Creek Indians. Moving into the twentieth century, the book features analysis of the South's relationship to the British Left from 1930 to 1960, and an investigation of the South's role in 1950s British popular music. With an engaging afterword that explores the difficulties in comprehending both Britain and theAmerican South in the present day as well as in the past, this book shows that the relationship between the two has always been--and continues to be--complex, subtle, and meaningful.
Main Description
InBritain and the American South: From Colonialism to Rock and Roll, historians analyze central aspects of the cultural exchanges between Britain and the American South.Along with the Spanish and the French, the British were among the first Europeans to have contact with the native peoples in what would come to be known as the American South. During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the British were intensively engaged in colonizing much of the region and developing its economy. The American Revolution severed the governmental links between Britain and its Southern colonies, but economic, social, religious, and cultural ties persevered during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.Britain and the American South: From Colonialism to Rock and Rollilluminates Britain's evolving relationship with the South over a period of four centuries, an era that witnessed Britain's rise to imperial dominance and then the gradual erosion of its influence on the wider world. It considers the British influence upon-and often critical responses to-Southern institutions and cultural formations such as religion, gentility, slavery, and music.Two chapters focus on Britain's response to the Confederacy, while other essays look even further into the past, concentrating on the English legacy in colonial times, its influence on Southern religion, and Britain's relationship with the Creek Indians. Moving into the twentieth century, the book features analysis of the South's relationship to the British Left from 1930 to 1960, and an investigation of the South's role in 1950s British popular music.With an engaging afterword that explores the difficulties in comprehending both Britain and the American South in the present day as well as in the past, this book shows that the relationship between the two has always been-and continues to be-complex, subtle, and meaningful.Joseph P. Ward, an associate professor of history at the University of Mississippi, is the author ofMetropolitan Communities: Trade Guilds, Identity, and Change in Early Modern Londonand the co-editor ofProtestant Identities: Religion, Society, and Self-Fashioning in Post-Reformation EnglandandThe Country and the City Revisited: England and the Politics of Culture, 1550-1850.
Main Description
In Britain and the American South: From Colonialism to Rock and Roll, historians analyze central aspects of the cultural exchanges between Britain and the American South. Along with the Spanish and the French, the British were among the first Europeans to have contact with the native peoples in what would come to be known as the American South. During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the British were intensively engaged in colonizing much of the region and developing its economy. The American Revolution severed the governmental links between Britain and its Southern colonies, but economic, social, religious, and cultural ties persevered during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Britain and the American South: From Colonialism to Rock and Rollilluminates Britain's evolving relationship with the South over a period of four centuries, an era that witnessed Britain's rise to imperial dominance and then the gradual erosion of its influence on the wider world. It considers the British influence upon-and often critical responses to-Southern institutions and cultural formations such as religion, gentility, slavery, and music. Two chapters focus on Britain's response to the Confederacy, while other essays look even further into the past, concentrating on the English legacy in colonial times, its influence on Southern religion, and Britain's relationship with the Creek Indians. Moving into the twentieth century, the book features analysis of the South's relationship to the British Left from 1930 to 1960, and an investigation of the South's role in 1950s British popular music. With an engaging afterword that explores the difficulties in comprehending both Britain and the American South in the present day as well as in the past, this book shows that the relationship between the two has always been-and continues to be-complex, subtle, and meaningful. Joseph P. Ward, an associate professor of history at the University of Mississippi, is the author of Metropolitan Communities: Trade Guilds, Identity, and Change in Early Modern Londonand the co-editor of Protestant Identities: Religion, Society, and Self-Fashioning in Post-Reformation Englandand The Country and the City Revisited: England and the Politics of Culture, 1550-1850.
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this text, historians analyse central aspects of the cultural exchanges between Britain and the American South. They consider the British influence upon Southern institutions and cultural formations such as religion, gentility, slavery and music.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Foreword: Empire Building and Empire Wreckingp. xi
Virginia's Religious Revolution: From Established Monopoly to Free Marketplacep. 3
Power and Authority in the Colonial South: The English Legacy and Its Contradictionsp. 27
"Like a Stone Wall Never to Be Broke": The British-Indian Boundary Line with the Creek Indians, 1763-1773p. 53
Carolinians Abroad: Cultivating English Identities from the Colonial Lower Southp. 81
The American South and English Print Satire, 1760-1865p. 107
British Views of the Confederacyp. 141
The South and the British Left, 1930-1960p. 163
"By Elvis and All the Saints": Images of the American South in the World of 1950s British Popular Musicp. 187
Afterword: On the Irrelevance of Knightsp. 215
Notesp. 229
Contributorsp. 269
Indexp. 271
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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