Catalogue


The 1912 election and the power of progressivism : a brief history with documents /
Brett Flehinger.
imprint
Boston : Bedford/St. Martin's, c2003.
description
xv, 204 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
ISBN
0312260296 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Boston : Bedford/St. Martin's, c2003.
isbn
0312260296 (pbk.)
catalogue key
5087280
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 187-192) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Brett Flehinger is an assistant professor of history at California State University, San Bernardino. He is currently working on a study of the democratic ideology of the La Follette family and has written articles and reviews on Progressive Era and New Deal political and economic reform
Summaries
Long Description
Faced with the challenge of adapting America's political and social order to the rise of corporate capitalism, in 1912 four presidential candidates -- Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, Woodrow Wilson, and Eugene Debs -- shaped Americans' thoughts about their public futures. Their positions would come to frame national conversation over the role of corporations in American life, determine the relation between the state and society that still controls our thinking about market regulation, and usher in a period of Progressive reform. Connecting the debates of 1912 to some of the most pressing issues of the Progressive Era, this volume presents selected sensational speeches, correspondence between these important figures and their allies and opponents, and 12 lively political cartoons. The documents are supported by an interpretive essay, a chronology, a bibliography, and a series of questions for student consideration, including ideas for a classroom debate.
Main Description
Faced with the challenge of adapting America's political and social order to the rise of corporate capitalism, in 1912 four presidential candidates Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, Woodrow Wilson, and Eugene Debs shaped Americans' thoughts about their public futures. Their positions would come to frame national conversation over the role of corporations in American life, determine the relation between the state and society that still controls our thinking about market regulation, and usher in a period of Progressive reform. Connecting the debates of 1912 to some of the most pressing issues of the Progressive Era, this volume presents selected sensational speeches, correspondence between these important figures and their allies and opponents, and 12 lively political cartoons. The documents are supported by an interpretive essay, a chronology, a bibliography, and a series of questions for student consideration, including ideas for a classroom debate.
Unpaid Annotation
Faced with the challenge of adapting America's political and social order to the rise of corporate capitalism, in 1912 four presidential candidates--Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, Woodrow Wilson, and Eugene Debs--shaped Americans' thoughts about their public futures. Their positions would come to frame national conversation over the role of corporations in American life, determine the relation between the state and society that still controls our thinking about market regulation, and usher in a period of Progressive reform. Connecting the debates of 1912 to some of the most pressing issues of the Progressive Era, this volume presents selected sensational speeches, correspondence between these important figures and their allies and opponents, and 12 lively political cartoons. The documents are supported by an interpretive essay, a chronology, a bibliography, and a series of questions for student consideration, including ideas for a classroom debate.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. v
Prefacep. vii
Introduction: The Story of 1912: "A Year Supreme with Possibilities"p. 1
"Progressive": The Popular Labelp. 3
Republican Chaosp. 5
The Trouble with Taftp. 6
"My Hat Is in the Ring": Roosevelt Returnsp. 10
Democracy Redefined: The Republican Nominationp. 12
"Standing at Armageddon": Roosevelt and the Progressive Partyp. 14
An Almost Certain Victory: The Democratic Conventionp. 15
Socialism at High Tide: Eugene V. Debs and the Socialist Partyp. 17
The Problem of the Progressive Erap. 21
From Greenbackers to Populists: The Response to Changep. 22
The Progressive Responsep. 23
The Problem of Corporate Capitalismp. 24
Organized Efficiency: The Modern Corporationp. 26
Two Responses to Corporate Growthp. 28
A "Machine for Making Money": The Corporation and American Societyp. 29
The Candidates Debatep. 34
The Procorporatists: Theodore Roosevelt and Charles Van Hisep. 34
The Anticorporatists: Robert La Follette, Louis Brandeis, and Woodrow Wilsonp. 41
The Best of a Bad Lot: African American Options in 1912p. 47
Neither a "Flubdub" nor Second Rate: William Howard Taftp. 49
Socialism as Progressivism: Eugene V. Debs and the Socialist Partyp. 53
Epilogue: The Debate Continuedp. 57
The Documentsp. 63
The Procorporatists: Theodore Roosevelt and Charles Van Hisep. 65
The New Nationalism, August 31, 1910p. 65
Making a New Platform, September 10, 1910p. 70
Letters to Theodore Roosevelt Jr., Benjamin Barr Lindsay, and Chase Salmon Osborn, August 22, 1911, December 5, 1911, and January 18, 1912p. 71
A Charter of Democracy, February 12, 1912p. 75
Letters, October 21, 1911, and October 27, 1911p. 82
For Chairman of the Convention, June 18, 1912p. 85
A Confession of Faith, August 6, 1912p. 86
The Senior Partner, September 8, 1912p. 94
Letters to Mary Ella Lyon Swift, Florence Kelley, and Jane Addams, March 7, 1911, January 9, 1912, and ca. August 8, 1912p. 95
Letter to Julian La Rose Harris, August 1, 1912p. 97
Letters to Senator Robert M. La Follette, October 30, 1911, and November 21, 1911p. 100
Letter to Charles R. Van Hise, June 4, 1912, and Charles R. Van Hise, from Concentration and Control, 1912p. 102
The Anticorporatists: Robert M. La Follette, Louis D. Brandeis, and Woodrow Wilsonp. 106
Speech at Jamestown, North Dakota, March 14, 1912p. 106
Speech at Bismarck, North Dakota, March 14, 1912p. 108
Letter to Senator Jonathan Bourne, January 2, 1911p. 111
Letter to Blanche Morse, March 28, 1912p. 112
The Only Way, September 17, 1912, and Pay Day, September 7, 1912p. 114
Letter to Norman Hapgood, July 3, 1912p. 116
Letter to Alfred Brandeis, August 28, 1912p. 117
Correspondence, September 27, 1912, and September 30, 1912p. 118
Letter to Arthur Norman Holcombe, September 11, 1912p. 121
Trusts, Efficiency, and the New Party, September 14, 1912p. 122
Speech at Buffalo, New York, September 2, 1912p. 124
Speech at Sioux City, Iowa, September 17, 1912p. 127
Speech at Pueblo, Colorado, October 7, 1912p. 130
The Biggest Monopolies, October 9, 1912p. 134
Diary, August 14, 1912p. 135
Maud Malone Halts Wilson, October 20, 1912p. 136
The Time, the Place, and the Girl, June 25, 1912p. 140
Neither a "Flubdub" nor Second Rate: William Howard Taftp. 141
Speech at Nashua, New Hampshire, March 19, 1912p. 141
Speech at the American Academy of Political and Social Science, March 30, 1912p. 145
Letters to Horace D. Taft and Charles F. Brooker, March 1, 1912, and March 5, 1912p. 148
Speech at Elkton, Maryland, May 4, 1912p. 151
He Eats 'Em Up-and Grows! September 19, 1910p. 155
The Presidency, September 29, 1912p. 156
Progressive: The Popular Label, October 6, 1912p. 157
Socialism as Progressivism: Eugene V. Debsp. 158
Socialism Gives Only Cure for Trust Evils, November 25, 1911p. 158
A Study of Competition, May 28, 1910p. 162
Acceptance Speech, Undatedp. 163
Opening Speech of the Campaign, August 10, 1912p. 167
Platform, May 25, 1912p. 170
Mr. Voter Beware..., November 2, 1912p. 173
The Woman Question, January 13, 1912, and What Socialism Offers, September 28, 1912p. 174
Letter to Eugene V. Debs, August 8, 1912p. 175
Eugene V. Debs Says Moose Party Stole Socialist Planks, August 15, 1912, and Appeal to Reason, The Acid Test, September 21, 1912p. 177
Appendixes
A 1912 Election Chronology (1877-1930)p. 180
Questions for Considerationp. 185
Selected Bibliographyp. 187
Indexp. 195
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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