Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

The sorrows of empire : militarism, secrecy, and the end of the Republic /
Chalmers Johnson.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Metropolitan Books, 2004.
description
389 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0805070044
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Metropolitan Books, 2004.
isbn
0805070044
general note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 313-366) and index.
catalogue key
5085790
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Chalmers Johnson is president of the Japan Policy Research Institute and professor emeritus at the University of California, San Diego.
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
California Book Awards , USA, 2005 : Won
Excerpts
Excerpt from Book
FromThe Sorrows of Empire: As of September 2001, the Department of Defense acknowledged that at least 725 military bases exist outside the United States. Actually, there are many more, since some bases exist under informal agreements or disguises of various kinds. And others have been created in the years since. This military empire ranges from al-Udeid air base in the desert of Qatar, where several thousand troops live in air-conditioned tents, to expensive, permanent garrisons built in such unlikely places as southeastern Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, and Uzbekistan. Much like the British bases in Darjeeling, Kalimpong, and Srinagarthose north Indian hill stations used for the troops' rest and recreation in the summer heatU.S. armed forces operate a ski and vacation center at Garmish in the Bavarian Alps, a resort hotel in downtown Seoul, and 234 military golf courses worldwide. Seventy-one Learjets, thirteen Gulfstream IIIs, and seventeen Cessna Citation luxury jets are ready and waiting when U.S. admirals and generals come due for some R&R.
First Chapter

From The Sorrows of Empire:

As of September 2001, the Department of Defense acknowledged that at least 725 military bases exist outside the United States. Actually, there are many more, since some bases exist under informal agreements or disguises of various kinds. And others have been created in the years since. This military empire ranges from al-Udeid air base in the desert of Qatar, where several thousand troops live in air-conditioned tents, to expensive, permanent garrisons built in such unlikely places as southeastern Kosovo,

Kyrgyzstan, and Uzbekistan. Much like the British bases in Darjeeling, Kalimpong, and Srinagar—those north Indian hill stations used for the troops’ rest and recreation in the summer heat—U.S. armed forces operate a ski and vacation center at Garmish in the Bavarian Alps, a resort hotel in downtown Seoul, and 234 military golf courses worldwide. Seventy-one Learjets, thirteen Gulfstream IIIs, and seventeen Cessna Citation luxury jets are ready and waiting when U.S. admirals and generals come due for some R&R.

Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2003-12-08:
In his prescient 2000 bestseller, Blowback, East Asia scholar Johnson predicted dire consequences for a U.S. foreign policy that had run roughshod over Asia. Now he joins a chorus of Bush critics in this provocative, detailed tour of what he sees as America's entrenched culture of militarism, its "private army" of special forces and its worldwide archipelago of military "colonies." According to Johnson, before a mute public and Congress, oil and arms barons have displaced the State Department, secretly creating "a military juggernaut intent on world domination" and are exercising "preemptive intervention" for "oil, Israel, and... to fulfill our self-perceived destiny as a New Rome." Johnson admits that Bill Clinton, who disguised his policies as globalization, was a "much more effective imperialist," but most of the book assails "the boy emperor" Bush and his cronies with one of the most startling and engrossing accounts of exotic defense capabilities, operations and spending in print, though these assertions are not new and not always assiduously sourced. Fans of Blowback will be pleased despite Johnson's lack of remedies other than "a revolution" in which "the people could retake control of Congress... and cut off the supply of money to the Pentagon." (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Library Journal on 2004-02-01:
A regular contributor to the Nation, Johnson extends the antimilitarist thesis that he put forth in Blowback: The Costs and Consequences of American Empire to current issues of U.S. foreign policy in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other areas in the Gulf region. Likening the United States to imperial Rome and calling contemporary America "a military juggernaut intent on world domination," Johnson recounts episodes of what he labels "imperialism" in U.S. history and emphasizes the dangers of a military bureaucracy that he thinks increasingly influences the formation of U.S. foreign policy and the running of our government. His criticism ranges far, attacking racism and sexism in the military, secrecy in defense department and intelligence bureaucracy, the unauthorized use of mercenaries, and the support of "globalization" as a tool of "economic imperialism." Although Johnson's provocative analysis reveals disturbing government action, especially in the use of the U.S. justice system, the recurring analogy he makes of America to the Roman Empire is specious and largely undocumented, and his criticism of U.S. world hegemony in the post-Cold War period does not adequately discuss foreign policy alternatives for dealing with world terrorism and genocidal wars. This clearly written, controversial critique of American foreign policy and the military is suitable for most academic and larger public libraries.-Jack Forman, San Diego Mesa Coll. Lib. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Chilling . . . a frightening picture . . . of the spread of American military and economic control over the world." - The New York Times Book Review "Original and genuinely important . . . The role of the prophet is an honorable one. In Chalmers Johnson the American empire has found its Jeremiah. He deserves to be heard." - The Washington Post Book World "Trenchantly argued, comprehensively documented, grimly eloquent . . . Worthy of the republic it seeks to defend." -The Boston Globe
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Library Journal, September 2003
Publishers Weekly, December 2003
Booklist, January 2004
Library Journal, February 2004
Washington Post, February 2004
New York Times Book Review, March 2004
Boston Globe, April 2004
Publishers Weekly, June 2004
Library Journal, July 2004
San Francisco Chronicle, December 2004
New York Times Book Review, January 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
From the author of the prophetic national bestseller Blowback , a startling look at militarism, American style, and its consequences abroad and at home In the years after the Soviet Union imploded, the United States was described first as the globe's "lone superpower," then as a "reluctant sheriff," next as the "indispensable nation," and now, in the wake of 9/11, as a "New Rome." Here, Chalmers Johnson thoroughly explores the new militarism that is transforming America and compelling its people to pick up the burden of empire. Reminding us of the classic warnings against militarism - from George Washington's farewell address to Dwight Eisenhower's denunciation of the military-industrial complex - Johnson uncovers its roots deep in our past. Turning to the present, he maps America's expanding empire of military bases and the vast web of services that supports them. He offers a vivid look at the new caste of professional warriors who have infiltrated multiple branches of government, who classify as "secret" everything they do, and for whom the manipulation of the military budget is of vital interest. Among Johnson's provocative conclusions is that American militarism is putting an end to the age of globalization and bankrupting the United States, even as it creates the conditions for a new century of virulent blowback. The Sorrows of Empire suggests that the former American republic has already crossed its Rubicon - with the Pentagon leading the way.
Main Description
From the author of the prophetic national bestseller Blowback , a startling look at militarism, American style, and its consequences abroad and at home In the years after the Soviet Union imploded, the United States was described first as the globe's "lone superpower," then as a "reluctant sheriff," next as the "indispensable nation," and now, in the wake of 9/11, as a "New Rome." Here, Chalmers Johnson thoroughly explores the new militarism that is transforming America and compelling its people to pick up the burden of empire. Reminding us of the classic warnings against militarismfrom George Washington's farewell address to Dwight Eisenhower's denunciation of the military-industrial complexJohnson uncovers its roots deep in our past. Turning to the present, he maps America's expanding empire of military bases and the vast web of services that supports them. He offers a vivid look at the new caste of professional warriors who have infiltrated multiple branches of government, who classify as "secret" everything they do, and for whom the manipulation of the military budget is of vital interest. Among Johnson's provocative conclusions is that American militarism is putting an end to the age of globalization and bankrupting the United States, even as it creates the conditions for a new century of virulent blowback. The Sorrows of Empire suggests that the former American republic has already crossed its Rubiconwith the Pentagon leading the way.
Main Description
From the author of the prophetic national bestseller Blowback , a startling look at militarism, American style, and its consequences abroad and at home In the years after the Soviet Union imploded, the United States was described first as the globe's "lone superpower," then as a "reluctant sheriff," next as the "indispensable nation," and now, in the wake of 9/11, as a "New Rome." Here, Chalmers Johnson thoroughly explores the new militarism that is transforming America and compelling its people to pick up the burden of empire.Reminding us of the classic warnings against militarism-from George Washington's farewell address to Dwight Eisenhower's denunciation of the military-industrial complex-Johnson uncovers its roots deep in our past. Turning to the present, he maps America's expanding empire of military bases and the vast web of services that supports them. He offers a vivid look at the new caste of professional warriors who have infiltrated multiple branches of government, who classify as "secret" everything they do, and for whom the manipulation of the military budget is of vital interest.Among Johnson's provocative conclusions is that American militarism is putting an end to the age of globalization and bankrupting the United States, even as it creates the conditions for a new century of virulent blowback. The Sorrows of Empire suggests that the former American republic has already crossed its Rubicon-with the Pentagon leading the way.
Main Description
From the author of the prophetic national bestsellerBlowback, a startling look at militarism, American style, and its consequences abroad and at home In the years after the Soviet Union imploded, the United States was described first as the globe's "lone superpower," then as a "reluctant sheriff," next as the "indispensable nation," and now, in the wake of 9/11, as a "New Rome." Here, Chalmers Johnson thoroughly explores the new militarism that is transforming America and compelling its people to pick up the burden of empire. Reminding us of the classic warnings against militarismfrom George Washington's farewell address to Dwight Eisenhower's denunciation of the military-industrial complexJohnson uncovers its roots deep in our past. Turning to the present, he maps America's expanding empire of military bases and the vast web of services that supports them. He offers a vivid look at the new caste of professional warriors who have infiltrated multiple branches of government, who classify as "secret" everything they do, and for whom the manipulation of the military budget is of vital interest. Among Johnson's provocative conclusions is that American militarism is putting an end to the age of globalization and bankrupting the United States, even as it creates the conditions for a new century of virulent blowback.The Sorrows of Empiresuggests that the former American republic has already crossed its Rubiconwith the Pentagon leading the way. Chalmers Johnsonis president of the Japan Policy Research Institute, a non-profit research and public affairs organization devoted to public education concerning Japan and international relations in the Pacific. He taught for thirty years, 1962-1992, at the Berkeley and San Diego campuses of the University of California and held endowed chairs in Asian politics at both of them. At Berkeley he served as chairman of the Center for Chinese Studies and as chairman of the Department of Political Science. His B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees in economics and political science are all from the University of California, Berkeley. He first visited Japan in 1953 as a U.S. Navy officer and has lived and worked there with his wife, the anthropologist Sheila K. Johnson, virtually every year since 1961. Chalmers Johnson has been honored with fellowships from the Ford Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, and the Guggenheim Foundation; and in 1976 he was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has written numerous articles and reviews and some fifteen books, includingPeasant Nationalism and Communist Poweron the Chinese revolution,An Instance of Treasonon Japan's most famous spy,Revolutionary Changeon the theory of violent protest movements, andMITI and the Japanese Miracleon Japanese economic development. This last-named book laid the foundation for the "revisionist" school of writers on Japan, and because of it the Japanese press dubbed him the "Godfather of revisionism." He was chairman of the academic advisory committee for the PBS television series "The Pacific Century," and he played a prominent role in the PBS "Frontline" documentary "Losing the War with Japan." Both won Emmy awards. His most recent books are, as editor and contributor,Okinawa: Cold War Island; Blowback: The Costs and Consequences of American Empire(which won the 2001 American Book Award of the Before Columbus Foundation); andThe Sorrows of Empire: Militarism, Secrecy, and the End of the Republic. In the years after the Soviet Union imploded, the United States was described first as the globe's "lone superpower," then as a "reluctant sheriff," next as the "indispensable nation," an
Main Description
From the author of the prophetic national bestseller Blowback , a startling look at militarism, American style, and its consequences abroad and at home In the years after the Soviet Union imploded, the United States was described first as the globe's "lone superpower," then as a "reluctant sheriff," next as the "indispensable nation," and now, in the wake of 9/11, as a "New Rome." Here, Chalmers Johnson thoroughly explores the new militarism that is transforming America and compelling its people to pick up the burden of empire. Reminding us of the classic warnings against militarism'”from George Washington's farewell address to Dwight Eisenhower's denunciation of the military-industrial complex'”Johnson uncovers its roots deep in our past. Turning to the present, he maps America's expanding empire of military bases and the vast web of services that supports them. He offers a vivid look at the new caste of professional warriors who have infiltrated multiple branches of government, who classify as "secret" everything they do, and for whom the manipulation of the military budget is of vital interest. Among Johnson's provocative conclusions is that American militarism is putting an end to the age of globalization and bankrupting the United States, even as it creates the conditions for a new century of virulent blowback. The Sorrows of Empire suggests that the former American republic has already crossed its Rubicon'”with the Pentagon leading the way. Chalmers Johnson is president of the Japan Policy Research Institute, a non-profit research and public affairs organization devoted to public education concerning Japan and international relations in the Pacific. He taught for thirty years, 1962-1992, at the Berkeley and San Diego campuses of the University of California and held endowed chairs in Asian politics at both of them. At Berkeley he served as chairman of the Center for Chinese Studies and as chairman of the Department of Political Science. His B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees in economics and political science are all from the University of California, Berkeley. He first visited Japan in 1953 as a U.S. Navy officer and has lived and worked there with his wife, the anthropologist Sheila K. Johnson, virtually every year since 1961. Chalmers Johnson has been honored with fellowships from the Ford Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, and the Guggenheim Foundation; and in 1976 he was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has written numerous articles and reviews and some fifteen books, including Peasant Nationalism and Communist Power on the Chinese revolution, An Instance of Treason on Japan''s most famous spy, Revolutionary Change on the theory of violent protest movements, and MITI and the Japanese Miracle on Japanese economic development. This last-named book laid the foundation for the "revisionist" school of writers on Japan, and because of it the Japanese press dubbed him the "Godfather of revisionism." He was chairman of the academic advisory committee for the PBS television series "The Pacific Century," and he played a prominent role in the PBS "Frontline" documentary "Losing the War with Japan." Both won Emmy awards. His most recent books are, as editor and contributor, Okinawa: Cold War Island; Blowback: The Costs and Consequences of American Empire (which won the 2001 American Book Award of the Before Columbus Foundation); and The Sorrows of Empire: Militarism, Secrecy, and the End of the Republic . In the years after the Soviet Union imploded, the United States was described first as the globe''s "lone superpower," then as a "reluctant sheriff," next as the "indispensable nation," and, in the wake of 9/11, as a "New Rome." Here, Chalmers Johnson thoroughly explores the new militarism that is transforming America and compelling its people to pick up the burden of empire. Reminding us of the classic warnings against militarism'”from George Washington''s Farewell Address
Main Description
n the years after the Soviet Union imploded, the United States was described first as the globe's 'lone superpower,' then as a 'reluctant sheriff,' next as the 'indispensable nation,' and now, in the wake of 9/11, as a 'New Rome.' Here, Chalmers Johnson thoroughly explores the new militarism that is transforming America and compelling its people to pick up the burden of empire. Reminding us of the classic warnings against militarism-from George Washington's farewell address to Dwight Eisenhower's denunciation of the military-industrial complex-Johnson uncovers its roots deep in our past. Turning to the present, he maps America's expanding empire of military bases and the vast web of services that supports them. He offers a vivid look at the new caste of professional warriors who have infiltrated multiple branches of government, who classify as 'secret' everything they do, and for whom the manipulation of the military budget is of vital interest. Among Johnson's provocative conclusions is that American militarism is putting an end to the age of globalization and bankrupting the United States, even as it creates the conditions for a new century of virulent blowback. The Sorrows of Empire suggests that the former American republic has already crossed its Rubicon-with the Pentagon leading the way.
Table of Contents
Prologue: The Unveiling of the American Empirep. 1
Imperialisms, Old and Newp. 15
The Roots of American Militarismp. 39
Toward the New Romep. 67
The Institutions of American Militarismp. 97
Surrogate Soldiers and Private Mercenariesp. 131
The Empire of Basesp. 151
The Spoils of Warp. 187
Iraq Warsp. 217
Whatever Happened to Globalization?p. 255
The Sorrows of Empirep. 283
Notesp. 313
Acknowledgmentsp. 367
Indexp. 369
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem