Catalogue


Modes of viewing in Hellenistic poetry and art /
Graham Zanker.
imprint
Madison : University of Wisconsin Press, c2004.
description
xiv, 223 p.
ISBN
0299194507 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Madison : University of Wisconsin Press, c2004.
isbn
0299194507 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5085752
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Graham Zanker is associate professor in the Department of Classics at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-12-01:
Following up on his Realism in Alexandrian Poetry (CH, Dec'87), which documented the early Hellenistic literary taste for vivid detail and quotidian matter, Zanker compares the role of the viewer in early third-century BCE poetry (and a few later examples) and in fourth- to first-century BCE art. He focuses on what kinds of things were viewed and how they were physically regarded. Zanker compromises the usefulness of the study for present-day critics by not dealing with narratology or focalization, that is, with the more ideological--and indeterminate--aspects of viewership. Nor is his emphasis historicist: he leaves the changes from earlier eras unexplored, and the reader gets little sense of a cultural dialectic operating in both media. Instead, Zanker reads each medium to elucidate the other, seeking to determine in a given text or art work the viewer's supplementary, closural role and the expectations that, Zanker argues, enable the generic mixture and new subject matter common to and characteristic of Hellenistic poetry and art. ^BSumming Up: Optional. For graduate and research classics collections aiming at comprehensiveness. J. D. Reed University of Michigan
Reviews
Review Quotes
"No other book currently exists that so systematically attempts to unite evidence from art and poetry to construct a Hellenistic 'mode of viewing.' The originality of the work lies in the way it brings together material that is usually discussed in isolation."-Alexander Sens, Georgetown University
“No other book currently exists that so systematically attempts to unite evidence from art and poetry to construct a Hellenistic ‘mode of viewing.’ The originality of the work lies in the way it brings together material that is usually discussed in isolation.”-Alexander Sens, Georgetown University
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Taking a fresh look at the poetry and visual art of the Hellenistic age, from the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C. to 30 B.C., Graham Zanker makes enlightening discoveries about the assumptions and conventions of Hellenistic poets and artists and their audiences. Zanker offers exciting new interpretations by closely comparing poetry and art for the light each sheds on the other. He finds, for example, an exuberant expansion of subject matter in the Hellenistic periods in both literature and art, as styles and iconographic traditions reserved for grander themes in earlier eras were applied to themes, motifs, and subjects that were emphatically less grand.
Main Description
Taking a fresh look at the poetry and visual art of the Hellenistic age, from the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C. to the Romans’ defeat of Cleopatra in 30 B.C., Graham Zanker makes enlightening discoveries about the assumptions and conventions of Hellenistic poets and artists and their audiences. Zanker’s exciting new interpretations closely compare poetry and art for the light each sheds on the other. He finds, for example, an exuberant expansion of subject matter in the Hellenistic periods in both literature and art, as styles and iconographic traditions reserved for grander concepts in earlier eras were applied to themes, motifs, and subjects that were emphatically less grand.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Taking a fresh look at the poetry and visual art of the Hellenistic age, from the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC to 20 BC, Graham Zanker makes enlightening discoveries about the assumptions and conventions of Hellenistic poets and artists and their audiences.
Main Description
Taking a fresh look at the poetry and visual art of the Hellenistic age, from the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C. to the Romans' defeat of Cleopatra in 30 B.C., Graham Zanker makes enlightening discoveries about the assumptions and conventions of Hellenistic poets and artists and their audiences. Zanker's exciting new interpretations closely compare poetry and art for the light each sheds on the other. He finds, for example, an exuberant expansion of subject matter in the Hellenistic periods in both literature and art, as styles and iconographic traditions reserved for grander concepts in earlier eras were applied to themes, motifs, and subjects that were emphatically less grand.
Table of Contents
Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Abbreviationsp. xiii
Aims, Approaches, and Samplesp. 3
Full Presentation of the Imagep. 27
Reader or Viewer Supplementationp. 72
Reader or Viewer Integrationp. 103
An Eye for the New: Poetic Genres, Iconographical Traditionsp. 124
Viewing Pleasure and Painp. 144
Notesp. 171
Bibliographyp. 201
Indexp. 215
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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