Catalogue


Economic relations between Egypt and the Gulf oil states, 1967-2000 : petro-wealth and patterns of influence /
Gil Feiler.
imprint
Brighton ; Portland, OR : Sussex Academic Press, c2003.
description
xx, 407 p. : ill.
ISBN
1903900409 (acid-free)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Brighton ; Portland, OR : Sussex Academic Press, c2003.
isbn
1903900409 (acid-free)
contents note
Aid to Egypt, 1967-1978 : conflicting data -- Arab investment in Egypt -- Migration of Egyptian laborers to the oil countries and their remittances -- Aid policy of the oil countries toward Egypt -- Egypt's attitude to the Arab petro-dollars -- Egypt and the Gulf states, 1985-2000.
catalogue key
5083960
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Gil Feiler is a senior research associate of the Begin-Sadat Center for Strategic Studies at Bar Ilan University.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-09-01:
Feiler (Middle East academician and business specialist) examines in great detail economic relations between Egypt and the Arab oil exporting countries (despite the title, he includes Libya as well as the Persian Gulf states). Using a wide variety of primary sources, he examines aid, investment, and remittance flows in three initial chapters. Feiler contrasts aid pledges from these countries with the more modest sums Egypt received, and he shows that remittances had a more substantial impact than either aid or investment. In the next two chapters, Feiler examines donor and Egyptian politics associated with these economic relationships. A sixth chapter examines Egypt's deepening economic ties with the West after 1985 and its declining reliance on the Arab oil-exporting countries. A concluding chapter nicely assesses why the economic ties had less impact than suggested by the rhetoric on both sides. Investments were marginal, being guided by economics rather than politics. Egypt expected more aid on more generous terms; bitterness over Arab miserliness was a factor in Sadat's 1978 peace initiative to Israel. Because the aid offered was in large part a defense mechanism to ward off Egyptian military pressure or support for subversion, it gave the donor states little leverage. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduate through professional collections. P. Clawson Washington Institute for Near East Policy
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Aid, investment, and remittances did not put Egypt on the path to sustained growth in the 1970s; to the contrary, Egypt's economy remained in desperate straits, and its dependence on aid only grew deeper. Feiler documents Egyptian disappointment with aid and its bitterness over bearing what it considered and undue burden in the conflict against Israel factors which played no small part in Sadat's decision to seek a peace treaty with Israel. These factors also led Egypt to turn to the West economically. Indeed, as the slow turn began in the late 1980s, Egyptian economic performance began to improve. The accelerating turn after the 1991 Kuwait war, rather than the Arab aid in the wake of Egypt's role in that conflict, accounted for country's strong economic showing in the 1990s." Middle East Quarterly
"Feiler examines in great detail economic relations between Egypt and the Arab oil exporting countries... A concluding chapter nicely assesses why the economic ties had less impact than suggested by the rhetoric on both sides... Recommended." -- Social & Behavioral Sciences.
"Feiler examines in great detail economic relations between Egypt and the Arab oil exporting countries... A concluding chapter nicely assesses why the economic ties had less impact than suggested by the rhetoric on both sides... Recommended." Social & Behavioral Sciences
"Gil Feiler's book on the Economic Relations between Egypt and the Gulf States treats a long neglected subject. His extremely well-researched study is a valuable contribution to the literature on the political economy and the international relations of the Middle East. He is able to shed additional light on the motivations of the Egyptian foreign policy in the 19672000 period, offering the reader a systematic and comprehensive analysis of the importance of Cairo's economic ties with the Gulf states. The book also provides a wealth of factual economic data, rare information that has long been sought after by researchers." Prof. Ephraim Inbar, BeginSadat (BESA) Center for Strategic Studies, Bar-Ilan University
"... This carefully researched and well-written study should be on the shelf of anyone wanting a penetrating assessment of the limits to petro-power. Regional specialists will gain new insights into the opaque world of petro-politics." The International History Review
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The upheaval in oil prices in the early 1970s gave rise to major changes in inter-Arab relations. While the oil-producing countries became rich and their citizens enjoyed one of the highest standards of living in the world, the Arab World's cultural and historical leader, Egypt, was enmeshed in an economic morass, barely managing to finance the import of foodstuffs for her population and at the forefront of the Arab confrontation with Israel. The author provides a unique insight into a virtually unseen current that has shaped Middle East war and politics for over 30 years by explaining the intricate and ever shifting relationship between Egypt and the immensely wealthy Arab Gulf newcomers. The book analyses the effects economic aid and cooperation had on the political relation- ship between the two sides, and on President Sadat's peace initiative with Israel. It provides a wealth of new data and original and insightful analysis, and fills an important gap in our understanding of the inner economic workings of the modern Arab world.
Main Description
This book provides a unique insight into a virtually unseen current that has shaped Middle East war and politics for over 30 years by explaining the intricate and ever shifting relationship between Egypt and the immensely wealthy Arab Gulf newcomers. The efforts of the Gulf states to exert political and cultural influence over Egypt through use of their oil revenues is described in detail, alongside concurrent Egyptian efforts to redistribute the oil wealth while maintaining complete policy independence and primacy. Drawing on previously unpublished reports, and on first-hand interviews with key persons throughout the region (including two Egyptian premiers), the book provides a first-time look at the full extent of the economic ties, at the inner workings of the relations, and at their long-term impact. New data and analysis shows the underlying logic and impact of this relationship, and the powerful interplay and the shifting balance of power.
Unpaid Annotation
"The upheaval in oil prices in the early 1970s gave rise to major changes in inter-Arab relations. While the oil-producing countries became rich and their citizens enjoyed one of the highest standards of living in the world, the Arab World's cultural and h"
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vi
Acknowledgementsp. xiii
List of Tables and Figuresp. xv
List of Abbreviationsp. xix
Aid to Egypt, 1967-1978p. 1
Arab Investment in Egyptp. 41
Labor Migration to the Arab Oil Countriesp. 98
Aid Policy of the Arab Oil Countries toward Egypt: Containment and the Construction of Arab Unityp. 117
Egypt and the Arab Petro-Dollar Influencep. 161
Egypt and the Gulf States, 1985-2000p. 230
Arab Aid: The Shifting Equationp. 253
Notesp. 269
Bibliographyp. 347
Indexp. 407
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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