Catalogue


Exorcism and its texts : subjectivity in early modern literature of England and Spain /
Hilaire Kallendorf.
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, 2003.
description
xix, 327 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0802088171
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, 2003.
isbn
0802088171
catalogue key
5076383
 
CRRS copy is gift to Victoria University Library. Eisenbichler, Konrad. 2004/11/23.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Hilaire Kallendorf is an assistant professor of Hispanic Studies at Texas A&M University.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2004
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Summaries
Description for Reader
Exorcism and demonic possession appear as recurrent motifs in early modern Spanish and English literatures. In Exorcism and Its Texts, Hilaire Kallendorf demonstrates how this 'infection' was represented in some thirty works of literature by fifteen different authors, ranging from canonical classics like Shakespeare, Cervantes, Ben Jonson, and Lope de Vega, to obscure works by anonymous writers.From comic and tragic drama to picaresque narrative and eight other genres, possession worked as a paradigm through which authors could convey extraordinary experience, including not only demonic possession but also madness or even murder. The devil was thought to be able to enter the bodily organs and infect memory, imagination, and reason. Some came to believe that possession was tied to enthusiasm, poetic frenzy, prophecy, and genius. Authors often drew upon sensational details of actual exorcisms. In some cases, such as in Shakespeare, curing the body (and the body politic) meant affirming cultural authority; in others, as with Zamora, it clearly meant subverting it. Drawing on the disciplines of literary theory and history, Exorcism and its Texts is the first comprehensive study of this compelling topic.
Main Description
Exorcism and demonic possession appear as recurrent motifs in early modern Spanish and English literatures. In Exorcism and Its Texts , Hilaire Kallendorf demonstrates how this 'infection' was represented in some thirty works of literature by fifteen different authors, ranging from canonical classics like Shakespeare, Cervantes, Ben Jonson, and Lope de Vega, to obscure works by anonymous writers. From comic and tragic drama to picaresque narrative and eight other genres, possession worked as a paradigm through which authors could convey extraordinary experience, including not only demonic possession but also madness or even murder. The devil was thought to be able to enter the bodily organs and infect memory, imagination, and reason. Some came to believe that possession was tied to enthusiasm, poetic frenzy, prophecy, and genius. Authors often drew upon sensational details of actual exorcisms. In some cases, such as in Shakespeare, curing the body (and the body politic) meant affirming cultural authority; in others, as with Zamora, it clearly meant subverting it. Drawing on the disciplines of literary theory and history, Exorcism and its Texts is the first comprehensive study of this compelling topic.
Description for Reader
Exorcism and demonic possession appear as recurrent motifs in early modern Spanish and English literatures. In Exorcism and Its Texts, Hilaire Kallendorf demonstrates how this 'infection' was represented in some thirty works of literature by fifteen different authors, ranging from canonical classics like Shakespeare, Cervantes, Ben Jonson, and Lope de Vega, to obscure works by anonymous writers. From comic and tragic drama to picaresque narrative and eight other genres, possession worked as a paradigm through which authors could convey extraordinary experience, including not only demonic possession but also madness or even murder. The devil was thought to be able to enter the bodily organs and infect memory, imagination, and reason. Some came to believe that possession was tied to enthusiasm, poetic frenzy, prophecy, and genius. Authors often drew upon sensational details of actual exorcisms. In some cases, such as in Shakespeare, curing the body (and the body politic) meant affirming cultural authority; in others, as with Zamora, it clearly meant subverting it. Drawing on the disciplines of literary theory and history, Exorcism and its Textsis the first comprehensive study of this compelling topic.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Exorcism and demonic possession appear as recurrent motifs in early modern Spanish and English literatures. This text demonstrates how this 'infection' was represented in some 30 works of literature by 15 different authors, ranging from canonical classics to more obscure works.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Prologue--A Force Within: The Importance of Demonic Possession for Early Modern Studiesp. xiii
A Paradigm of Theologemes for Literary Exorcismp. xxi
Introduction: The Morphology of Exorcism, or a Grammar of Possession in Spanish and English Literature, 1550-1700p. 3
Demoniacs in the Drama: Theatricalities of Comic Possession and the Exorcism of the Body Politicp. 17
The Demon Enters the Body: Alonso de la Vega's La duquesa de la rosap. 19
Symptoms of Possession: Jonson's The Devil is an Assp. 23
Demonic Polyglossia: Ruggle's Ignoramusp. 26
The Coach: Jonson's Volponep. 29
The Exorcist: Shakespeare's Twelfth Nightp. 33
The Lovers' Ruse: The Bugbearsp. 35
The (Mock) Exorcism: Shakespeare's Comedy of Errorsp. 39
Binding the Body: Timoneda's Los menemnosp. 44
Relics, Holy Water, and Other Props: Shadwell's The Lancashire Witchesp. 48
The Successful Exorcism: El pleyto que tuvo el diablop. 51
Exorcizing the Body Politic: Zamora's El hechizado por fuerza and Middleton's The Phoenixp. 56
Possessed Picaros and Satanic Satirep. 67
An Erasmian View of Lazarillo's Fifth Tratadop. 68
Another Picaro and Another Alguacil endemoniado: Quevedo's Buscon, Suenos, Satirical Poetry, and La endemoniada fingidap. 75
Alguacil endemoniado or Demonio alguacilado?p. 79
'The Experienced Mysteries of Damnation'p. 81
'Da ... al discurso miedo': The Printing of Forbidden Knowledgep. 89
'Libido sciendi'p. 92
Romance, the Interlude, and Hagiographical Drama: The Humanization of Possession and Exorcismp. 97
Romance, the Interlude, and the Restoration of Order: Cervantes' Persiles and Lope's La endemoniadap. 99
Rebirth and Hagiography: Cervantes' El rufian dichosop. 104
'False Miracles and Apocryphal Things': Cervantes and the Debate over the Comedia de santosp. 113
Saint = Exorcist: Calderon's Las cadenas del demonio and Lope's El divino africanop. 117
Tragedy As the Absence or Failure of Exorcismp. 126
The Relationship of Satire to Tragedy: Harsnett's Declarationp. 127
Exorcism as Neo-Aristotelian Catharsis: King Learp. 131
The Demon As Scapegoat: A Yorkshire Tragedy, with a Note on Othello and Macbethp. 140
Tragedy, Possession, and Performativity: Hamletp. 149
Self-Exorcism and the Rise of the Novelp. 157
Poltergeists and Wizards: Supernatural Pranks in Part I of Don Quijotep. 158
Mysterious Caves and Flying Horses: Diabolical Humour in Part II of Don Quijotep. 165
Lucid Intervals and a Wise Enchanter: Demonic Possession in Don Quijotep. 167
The Paradox of Self-Exorcismp. 176
Self-Exorcism and the Rise of the Autonomous Novelistic Characterp. 180
Conclusion: Liturgy in Literature, or Early Modern Literary Theory and the Christian Legitimate Marvellousp. 184
Epilogue: Problematizing the Category of 'Demonic Possession'p. 200
Notesp. 207
Bibliographyp. 265
Indexp. 307
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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